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Interactive guide research

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  • 1. Interactive Student Guide to Using the Information Literacy Process Model Note to teachers: For suggestions on how to teach the research process using this interactive guide, click here .
  • 2. What is the Information Literacy Process Model? The Information Literacy Process (ILP) Model is a nine step guide to the research process. It begins where you begin as a researcher: when you encounter a task, like a school assignment, or need information to satisfy your curiosity, or solve a problem. Information Literacy Process (ILP) Model Any time you feel you need more help than this PowerPoint provides, click on the ILP Model icon to go to many more resources.
  • 3. What are the steps in the Information Process?
    • Step 1 – Encountering the Task
    • Step 2 – Exploring Questioning Connecting
    • Step 3 – Searching Locating
    • Step 4 – Collecting Organizing Managing Monitoring
    • Step 5 – Analyzing Evaluating Interpreting Inferring
    • Step 6 – Synthesizing & Solving
    • Step 7 – Applying New Understanding
    • Step 8 – Communicating
    • Step 9 - Reflecting
    You might feel overwhelmed and anxious in the beginning, but do not worry! This guide is designed to help you step-by-step through the process.
  • 4. Taking away the Big Idea It’s time to communicate! Apply your new understanding What will it mean for ME? How can I better understand what I found? How can I manage the things I find? How do I explore? What questions do I ask? How do I begin?  If you only need help with a few steps, you don’t need to go through the entire PowerPoint; instead, you can click on any of the links above to get help
  • 5. STEP 1 – Encountering the Task
    • You encounter the task when you:
    • Recognize the need for information.
    • Become aware of possibilities.
    • Select general area of need/concern.
    • Seek background information.
    The next slide will walk you through activities that will help you complete Step 1. Click the underlined link to go to each activity.
  • 6. STEP 1 – Encountering the Task
    • Identify what you already know and what you need to know to complete the task by completing this KWLH.
  • 7. STEP 1 – Encountering the Task
    • Seek background information by entering your topic in the search box of a general reference, like WorldBook .
    Do not worry yet about taking good notes! Your purpose in reading is to gather general background information or a bird’s eye view of your topic. Simply list important ideas in the third column of your KWLH Chart.
  • 8.
    • Become aware of the possibilities by brainstorming related topics. Click here for a tutorial on how to brainstorm, or create a web like the one below to begin.
    STEP 1 – Encountering the Task Sub-topic Sub-topic Sub-topic Main idea
  • 9. STEP 1 – Encountering the Task
    • Begin to focus on a topic or general area of need/concern by identifying sub-topics and key words. Click here for a worksheet to help you unlock the key words. If you need more help, try using ThinkTank or the Task Definition Chart .
  • 10. Self-check
    • Did you complete the KWLH?
    • Did you consult a general reference like WorldBook ?
    • Did you brainstorm related topics?
    • Did you begin to focus on the topic by identifying sub-topics and key words?
    Pop Quiz! Good keywords for the topic, soccer, are: sports; World Cup; and Argentina. I agree I disagree When you have completed all of these steps and passed the quiz, go to the next step, Exploring or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house
  • 11.
    • The purpose of using keywords is to help narrow your focus. For example, if you start with a broad general topic, like sports, you would narrow your focus by choosing the type of sport, a famous player, or a championship event.
    • Topic: sports
    • Keywords: soccer; World Cup; Argentina team
    • In the quiz, sports is more general than soccer.
    Need more help? Remember that you can click on the ILP Model at any time for more resources. Sorry – Wrong answer Next slide Don’t be discouraged. Learning how to use key words is really hard. Some people still have problems when they get to college!
  • 12. I disagree!
    • If you would like more ways to narrow or focus in on your topic, click here .
    • If you think you are ready for Step 2 – Exploring, click here .
    Next slide Great job! Sports is much more general than using a specific sport, like soccer.
  • 13. STEP 2 - Exploring
    • When you explore your topic, you:
    • Pose questions. Frame ideas.
    • Connect new ideas with prior knowledge.
    • Construct a plan to accomplish the task.
    • Establish a purpose for reading.
    Click here to go to the activities which will help you successfully complete Step 2. Are you feeling a little confused after looking at this list because you identified your prior knowledge in Step 1 and here it is again in Step 2? The Information Literacy Process is recursive which means you revisit ideas as you gain more information. Good researchers, like good readers, constantly connect what they learn with what they know.
  • 14. Step 2 - Exploring
    • First, brainstorm questions you have about your topic. Then, measure, and finally, use your questions to organize your research and frame ideas.
      • Use this form to guide you through exploring your ideas and questions.
      • Remember to save and print your answers!
  • 15. Step 2 - Exploring
    • Connect new ideas with prior knowledge.
      • Review what you’ve learned so far. Ask yourself, “How does my new learning fit with what I already know? What connections can I make?”
  • 16. Step 2 - Exploring
    • One way to construct a plan to accomplish the task is to create a calendar. On the calendar, list not only your teacher’s due dates, but also your dates for getting things finished. Remember to give yourself extra time, so that you won’t fall behind if you get sick, or have trouble finding the answers to some of your questions.
      • Use this link to construct a calendar in Publisher. Simply follow the directions to create your very own research calendar and plan. Remember to print your calendar and display it prominently, like on your refrigerator.
  • 17. Step 2 - Exploring
    • Establish a purpose for reading .
    Many researchers feel overwhelmed by the amount of reading they have to do. It helps to keep in mind your purpose for reading. When you are reading to explore an idea, skim the text. When you are reading for information, simply scan the text for your key words.
  • 18. Self-check
    • Did you brainstorm questions to guide your research?
    • Did you evaluate your questions?
    • Did you make connections between what you’ve learned and what you know?
    • Did you create a calendar and a plan for research?
    • Do you know when to skim and when to scan for information?
  • 19. Quick Quiz
    • Skimming is used to quickly identify the main idea of the text.
    • When you skim, you read slowly and carefully.
    • Scanning involves moving your eyes quickly down the page as you seek specific key words or phrases.
    True False True False True False
  • 20. Correct!
    • Skimming is used to quickly identify the main idea of the text.
      • When you skim, you read three to four times faster than normal.
      • To skim the text, read only the first and last paragraph. Then, skim the text features. Finally, skim the first sentence of every paragraph.
    • Scanning is used to quickly locate key words and phrases.
      • When you scan, you look only for the key words/phrases.
      • When you scan, you read ten times faster than normal.
    Great job! Congratulations! You’ve completed all of the steps and passed the quiz. You may go to the next step, Searching and Locating or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 21. Incorrect.
    • Skimming is used to quickly identify the main idea of the text.
      • When you skim, you read three to four times faster than normal.
      • To skim the text, read only the first and last paragraph. Then, skim the text features. Finally, skim the first sentence of every paragraph.
    • Scanning is used to quickly locate key words and phrases.
      • When you scan, you look only for the key words/phrases.
      • When you scan, you read ten times faster than normal.
    Sorry, wrong answer! If you want more practice, check out Super Read!, an interactive guide to skimming. Then, go to the next step, Searching and Locating
  • 22. STEP 3 – Searching & Locating
    • To quickly locate information, you may want to:
    • Identify useful resources by using NoodleTools Search Strategy Wizard.
    • Use the Information Literacy Tutorial to Formulate search plans and strategies.
      • If your first search yielded hundreds of results, then you may want to refine your search strategies.
    • Evaluate information using criteria.
      • Still not sure you can trust the web site? Try using the five criteria for evaluating web sites , or asking your teacher, library media specialist, or parent for help.
  • 23. STEP 3 – Searching & Locating If this is your first time searching for information independently, you may want to try some other tutorials. Click on the ILP Model Icon to go to more help.
  • 24. Quick Quiz
    • To refine your search, use Boolean operators: to, the, and for.
    • To evaluate a web site, use the following criteria: authority; accuracy; objectivity; currency; and coverage.
    True False True False
  • 25.
    • To refine your search, use the Boolean operators:
    • And – to narrow your search (ex.
    • Or – to broaden your search
    • Not – narrow your search and exclude specific terms
    • The five criteria for evaluating a web site:
    • Accuracy. If your page lists the author and institution that published the page and provides a way of contacting him/her and . . .
    • Authority. If your page lists the author credentials and its domain is preferred (.edu, .gov, .org, or .net), and, . .
    • Objectivity. If your page provides accurate information with limited advertising and it is objective in presenting the information, and . . .
    • Currency. If your page is current and updated regularly (as stated on the page) and the links (if any) are also up-to-date, and . . .
    • Coverage. If you can view the information properly--not limited to fees, browser technology, or software requirement, then . . . You may have a Web page that could be of value to your research!
    • FROM: Kapoun, Jim. "Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction." C&RL News (July/August 1998): 522-523.
    Congratulations! You’ve completed all of the steps and passed the quiz. You may go to the next step, Collecting, or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 26.
    • To refine your search, use the Boolean operators:
    • And – to narrow your search (ex.
    • Or – to broaden your search
    • Not – narrow your search and exclude specific terms
    • The five criteria for evaluating a web site:
    • Accuracy. If your page lists the author and institution that published the page and provides a way of contacting him/her and . . .
    • Authority. If your page lists the author credentials and its domain is preferred (.edu, .gov, .org, or .net), and, . .
    • Objectivity. If your page provides accurate information with limited advertising and it is objective in presenting the information, and . . .
    • Currency. If your page is current and updated regularly (as stated on the page) and the links (if any) are also up-to-date, and . . .
    • Coverage. If you can view the information properly--not limited to fees, browser technology, or software requirement, then . . . You may have a Web page that could be of value to your research!
    • FROM: Kapoun, Jim. "Teaching undergrads WEB evaluation: A guide for library instruction." C&RL News (July/August 1998): 522-523.
    Sorry, wrong answer! If you want more practice, check out ‘ NetCheck , an online evaluation tool. Then, go to the next step, Collecting, or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 27. STEP 4 - Collecting
    • To effectively collect information, be sure to:
    • Collect ideas by sorting information in an ordering scheme, like chronological, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, pro/con, or into a cluster/main idea map.
    • Apply critical reading and thinking strategies.
    • Manage time, resources, and documents.
      • Make sure you have put all of your work into a folder.
      • Check your calendar for your next due date.
    • Monitor ethical and responsible use of information and technologies.
  • 28. STEP 4 - Collecting
    • Collect ideas by sorting information in an ordering scheme. Think about the organizational scheme that fits your purpose for collecting information; then, click on the link below to go to an Inspiration template, or another type of organizer.
    • chronological ,
    • cause/effect ,
    • comparison/contrast ,
    • cluster/main idea
    • another type of organizer
  • 29. STEP 4 - Collecting
    • Apply critical reading and thinking strategies.
    Now that you have located the information you need, it’s time to apply critical reading and thinking strategies. As you read, use these links to make connections , ask questions , create visualizations , make predictions and inferences , determine important ideas , and use fix-up strategies .
  • 30. STEP 4 - Collecting
    • Manage time, resources, and documents.
      • Make sure you have put all of your work into a folder.
      • Check your calendar for your next due date.
  • 31. STEP 4 - Collecting
    • Click on the link to learn how to monitor ethical and responsible use of information and technologies. Choose the Flash version and use the next buttons to navigate through the web site. Skip the pre-assessment as you need an email address to get the results.
  • 32. Self-check: Please read the original source material carefully and then select the entry, either &quot;A&quot; or &quot;B,&quot; that you think has not been plagiarized. Click on the underlined link to check your answer. Student Example B: Reporters Karen Ayres and Mike Jackson report that “plagiarism appears to be more rampant than ever in high schools.” Part of the problem appears to be that students “don’t understand that surfing Web sites and lifting passages for their own assignments is stealing ideas, thoughts and words from others.” (Dallas Morning News) Student Example A: Cheating is as old as homework, but educators say plagiarism appears to happen more than ever in high schools and at colleges and universities. Copying web sites and lifting passages for their own assignments is stealing ideas, thoughts and words from others. (Dallas Morning News) Source: Ayres, Karen, and Mike Jackson. &quot;Teachers turn tables in plagiarism battle.&quot; Dallas Morning News 29 Jan. 2006: n.p. SIRS Researcher . ProQuest Information and Learning. Baltimore County Public Schools, Baltimore, MD. 14 July 2006 <http://www.sirs.com>. Original: “Cheating is as old as homework, but educators say plagiarism appears to be more rampant than ever in high schools and at colleges and universities. They blame the Internet. Students among the first generation to grow up online are writing term papers with unlimited resources at their fingertips.       But these young people, educators say, often don't understand that surfing Web sites and lifting passages for their own assignments is stealing ideas, thoughts and words from others.”
  • 33.
    • Sorry! Wrong answer.
    • Example A is plagiarized. The student did not use quotation marks around the authors’ words and did not give credit to the authors.
    Plagiarism is the act of using someone else's words, sentences, or ideas and passing them off as your own without giving credit by citing the original source. Plagiarizing someone’s work can get you in serious trouble. For more information, click on the link to go to my favorite tutorial. Choose the Flash version. While you can not take the pre-quiz, just click the Next button to learn more. If you need a quick review of plagiarism, click here . You are over half way finished! Check your research calendar to make sure you haven’t fallen behind. If you have time, give yourself a few days to think about your research before going to the next step, Analyzing. Remember that you can always click on the home button to choose another skill.
  • 34.
    • Correct!
    • Example B is not plagiarized. The student used quotation marks, gave credit to the authors, and cited the source.
    Plagiarism is the act of using someone else's words, sentences, or ideas and passing them off as your own without giving credit by citing the original source. Plagiarizing someone’s work can get you in serious trouble. For more information, click on the link to go to my favorite tutorial. Choose the Flash version. While you can not take the pre-quiz, just click the Next button to learn more. If you need a quick review of plagiarism, click here . You are over half way finished! Check your research calendar to make sure you haven’t fallen behind. If you have time, give yourself a few days to think about your research before going to the next step, Analyzing. Remember that you can always click on the home button to choose another skill.
  • 35. STEP 5 - Analyzing
    • When you analyze your notes, you may want to:
    • Determine importance of information and its relevance to essential question.
    • Sort information and ideas into component parts.
    • Make inferences , identify trends, interpret data.
    • Separate information and ideas into component parts.
    • Exercise flexibility in information seeking and collaboration with peers.
  • 36. Demonstration: Sifting Information Click here to see a demonstration of sifting. When you analyze your notes, you need to first, sift and then, sort the information you have gathered. Sifting is the process of weeding out information you don’t need and keeping what you do. Once you have sifted your information, then, it’s time to sort the information. Mutts Poodle Pit Bull Dogs
  • 37. Practice #1 Now it’s your turn to practice sifting. Remember to look back at your topic and keep only those ideas that support your topic. Right click and delete the subtopics that do not belong. Westward Expansion Tariffs Kansas- Nebraska Act Robert E. Lee Slavery Economic Differences Causes of the Civil War
  • 38. Demonstration: Sorting Information Click here to see a demonstration of sorting. Mutts Poodle Pit Bull Dogs Now, it’s time to sort the information. When you sort information, you look for facts and ideas that are the same.
  • 39. Practice #3 Now it’s your turn to practice sorting. Look at your topic. What topics or ideas are the same? Which are different? Right click, select format auto shape, and color code ideas that are alike. Synthesizing Asking Questions Connecting Organizing Collecting Analyzing Research Process
  • 40. Self-check
    • Did you sift the information you gathered by determining its importance?
    • Did you think about if and how the information answers your essential question?
    • Did you make inferences and interpret data?
    • Did you sort the information?
    Quick Quiz: Sifting is the process of sorting information into the main idea and sub-topics. I agree I disagree
  • 41.
    • When you sift information, you determine its importance and relevance to your essential question.
    • When you sort information, you identify the main idea and related sub-topics.
    Sorry, wrong answer! If you want more practice, check out Gathering, Sifting and Sorting . Then, go to the next step, Synthesizing , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 42.
    • When you sift information, you determine its importance and relevance to your essential question.
    • When you sort information, you identify the main idea and related sub-topics.
    Congratulations! You’ve completed all of the steps and passed the quiz. You may go to the next step, Synthesizing , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 43. STEP 6 – Synthesizing & Solving
    • When you synthesize and solve, you:
    • Synthesize by fusing, reordering, recalling, retelling to create new meaning or understanding.
    • Draw conclusions to create new meaning based on sound reasoning and authenticity of information.
    • Apply new understanding to solve the task.
  • 44. STEP 6 – Synthesizing & Solving
    • Synthesize by fusing, reordering, recalling, retelling to create new meaning or understanding.
    Synthesizing is the hardest part of the research process because you have to put all of the parts together into a unified whole. If you need more help, go to Synthesize New Information
  • 45. STEP 6 – Synthesizing & Solving
    • Draw conclusions to create new meaning based on sound reasoning and authenticity of information.
    For a step-by-step guide to synthesizing, click here . To see synthesis in action, click here .
  • 46. STEP 6 – Synthesizing & Solving
    • Apply new understanding to solve the task.
      • Click here for a one minute thinking activity that will help you apply your new understanding to solving your task.
  • 47. Self-check:
    • Did you synthesize your new learning?
    • Did you draw conclusions?
    • Did you apply you new understanding to your task?
    Quick Quiz: When you synthesize your new learning, you break down what you’ve learned into its component parts. True False
  • 48.
    • The statement is false. When you synthesize, you recall, reorder, and fuse what you know with what you learned. In the process, you create new understandings.
    Congratulations! You’ve completed every step and passed the quiz. Go to the next step, Applying New Understanding , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 49.
    • The statement is false. When you synthesize, you recall, reorder, and fuse what you know with what you learned. In the process, you create new understandings.
    Sorry, wrong answer! For a step-by-step guide to synthesizing, click here . To see synthesis in action, click here . Then, go to the next step, Applying New Understanding , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 50. STEP 7 – Applying New Understanding
    • To apply your new understanding, you need to:
    • Assess the scope of work and needed resources, materials, and equipment.
    • Use this Praise Question Polish form to seek peer review for new insights and revision.
    • Use the following rubrics to assess the product in terms of requirements your and your group’s work.
      • individual
      • group effort .
  • 51. Self-check
    • Did you assess the scope of work and needed resources, materials, and equipment?
    • Did you seek peer review for new insights and revision?
    • Did you assess your product and your work?
    Quick Quiz: Always begin your peer review by praising what the author did well. True False
  • 52.
    • Effective peer reviewers use the P raise – Q uestion – P olish method . They:
    • Begin by praising what works well in the draft; point to specific passages.
    • Ask questions about the large issues first (Are important and interesting ideas presented? Is the main point clear and interesting? Is there a clear focus? Is the draft well-organized? They go on to smaller issues later (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar errors).
    • Are specific in their suggestions on how to polish by explaining what they don't understand and in their suggestions for revision. As much as they can, they explain why they're making particular suggestions.
    Congratulations! You’ve completed every step and passed the quiz. Go to the next step, Communicating , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 53.
    • Effective peer reviewers use the P raise – Q uestion – P olish method . They:
    • Begin by praising what works well in the draft; point to specific passages.
    • Ask questions about the large issues first (Are important and interesting ideas presented? Is the main point clear and interesting? Is there a clear focus? Is the draft well-organized? They go on to smaller issues later (spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar errors).
    • Are specific in their suggestions on how to polish by explaining what they don't understand and in their suggestions for revision. As much as they can, they explain why they're making particular suggestions.
    Sorry, wrong answer! Review what effective peer review is and then, go to the next step, Communicating , or go home to choose another step by clicking on the house.
  • 54. STEP 8 - Communicating
    • To communicate your new learning, you may want to:
    • Determine the best method to communicate the resolution .
    • Convey new knowledge using effective communication skills .
    • Engage your audience in discussion and respond to feedback.
  • 55. Self-check
    • Did you determine the best method to communicate your new learning?
    • If your teacher assigned a final product, did you check the resource page and the rubric for help?
    • Have your practiced making your presentation?
    • Have you thought about how you will involve your audience?
    Are you nervous about making the presentation? If you answered yes, then, you are in good company! Most people, including famous actors, get nervous. It helps to practice your presentation several times and then, relax. Remember that you’re the expert now that you’ve completed your research.
  • 56. Quick Quiz:
    • When you present, you should include every single fact you learned.
    • Maintain eye contact as you make your presentation.
    • Speak very quickly. You have a lot of information to give.
    True False True False False True
  • 57. Correct!
    • Good presenters include the most important information. They also give their audience a framework for understanding.
    • Good presenters maintain eye contact with their audience.
    • Good presenters speak slowly and clearly. They do not need to rush through their presentation because they have included only the important information.
    Return to Quiz Go to the next step
  • 58. Sorry, wrong answer!
    • Good presenters include the most important information. They also give their audience a framework for understanding.
    • Good presenters maintain eye contact with their audience.
    • Good presenters speak slowly and clearly. They do not need to rush through their presentation because they have included only the important information.
    Return to Quiz Go to the next step
  • 59. STEP 9 - Reflecting
    • To reflect on what and how you have learned, you:
    • Apply metacognitive strategies to assess the research process and one's own thinking.
    • Transfer new knowledge to solve new problems.
    Reflecting is probably the most overlooked part of learning, but in some ways it is the most important! Thinking about how you learned helps you become a better learner. Thinking about what you learned helps you apply it to solve other problems. Play the Connection Cube game to see how what you learned helps you solve new problems.
  • 60. Teacher Notes
    • Helpful teacher implementation tips:
    • While the PowerPoint is designed to walk students step-by-step through the research process, you can choose to highlight only those steps where you feel your students need help. If you choose to do only certain steps, use the hyperlinks on the third slide to take you directly to that skill.
    • Collaborate with your library media specialist. If possible, team teach the Interactive Guide to Student Research.
    • Use the hyperlinks or the third slide to jump to the step you plan to cover during each class period.
    • Steps 1 & 2 can easily be completed on the same day.
    • Step 4, Collecting, is the most time intensive of the steps. You may want to allow at least two class periods to complete this step.
    • Many of the activities may be printed and completed either at home or in the classroom prior to coming to the computer lab.
    • MSDE Voluntary State Curriculum: Library Media Content Standards/ Core Learning Goals
    • 3.01 Provide instruction that teaches information literacy skills to students in various ways. Collaborative planning with the classroom teacher and teaching by the library media specialist in small or large groups accomplish the goal of the library media program to create independent learners with the ability to:
    • 3.01.01 locate and use information resources, equipment, and other technologies effectively and efficiently.
    • 3.01.02 review, evaluate, and select materials for an identified information need.
    • 3.01.03 learn and apply reading, research and critical thinking skills to organize information.
    • 3.01.04 comprehend content in various types of media.
    • 3.01.05 retrieve and manage information.
    • 3.01.06 demonstrate an appreciation of literature and other creative expressions as sources of information and recreation.
    • 3.01.07 create materials in various formats.
    • 3.01.08 apply ethical behavior to the use of information.
                                                                  Recommended time frame for completion:  9 days

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