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CEO 201 - Leveraging Our Resources
 

CEO 201 - Leveraging Our Resources

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  • Thank you Jesse for inviting - Johnson Center is happy to be a part… And thank you to all of you for spending your morning with us as we learn about the nonprofit sector and how we can be responsible, accountable board members. It was great to see how many of you are already board members in your communities. I’d like to ask all of you…

CEO 201 - Leveraging Our Resources CEO 201 - Leveraging Our Resources Presentation Transcript

  • CEO 201: Management and Leadership July 31, 2008 Leveraging Resources
    • Leveraging Our Resources
  • What makes nonprofits effective?
    • Work with government and advocate for policy change
    • Harness market forces and see business as a powerful partner
    • Convert individual supporters into evangelists for the cause
    • Build and nurture nonprofit networks, treating other groups as allies
    • Adapt to the changing environment
    • Share leadership, empowering others to be forces for good
  • NONPROFIT Government and advocacy Business Other nonprofits Individuals Nonprofit CEO Leadership Ethics Organizational management Board leadership Accountability
  • Leveraging Our Resources
    • Nonprofits have access to resources in community
      • Philanthropy
      • Government
      • Private Sector
      • Community members
    • Community Engagement is critical
  • What resources do we need to function effectively?
    • Exercise
      • What is your organization’s mission?
      • Reflect on current resources utilized to achieve your mission
      • What resources can you leverage further?
  • Community Engagement
    • An on-going process of involving and engaging the different individuals in your community with the work of your nonprofit, including engaging them in problem-solving and decision-making
    Adapted from : Minnesota Department of Health, “Overview: What is Community Engagement”
    • communicate to deliberate with
    • public hearing community conversation
    • talk to, tell talk with, share
    • seeking to establish/ protect turf seeking/finding common ground
    • authority responsibility
    • influencing the like-minded understanding those not like-minded
    • top down bottom up
    • building a hierarchy for establishing a stakeholder decision-
    • making network
    • goals/strategic plan values/vision
    • products process
    • public relations public or community engagement
    Adapted from : Minnesota Department of Health, “Overview: What is Community Engagement” COMMUNICATION (old way) ENGAGEMENT (new way)
  • How do we engage our community in our work?
    • Who are our stakeholders?
    • Who is “our community”?
    • How are the different groups involved in different areas of our work?
    • Social Entrepreneurship
  • Effective Methods for Social Missions
    • Combine a business mindset and discipline with the passion for solving social problems.
    • Innovative as well as determined to not be stifled by obstacles.
    • Look for the most effective ways of serving the public and fulfilling their mission.
  • Social Entrepreneurship
    • Social entrepreneurs exploit the opportunities that change (in technology, consumer preferences, social norms, etc.) creates.
    • “ The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity .” (Drucker)
    Contemporary Meaning of Entrepreneurship: Dees, Gregory. The Meaning of &quot;Social Entrepreneurship&quot; Duke University Fuqua Business School. The Kauffman Foundation, 2001. 1-5. 6 May 2008 <http://www.12manage.com/description_corporate_responsibility.html>.
      • They have a mindset that sees the possibilities rather than the problems created by change
      • Entrepreneurship do not need to be motivated by profits
      • They do not allow their own initial resource endowments to limit their options for projects
    Characteristics of Entrepreneurs
      • They are skilled at attracting resources efficiently and they are able to leverage their limited resources to draw in collaboration and partnership
      • Through their understanding of constituents they give projects and programs more value
      • They work to assess organizations on there outcomes of a program rather then their size and inputs
    Characteristics of Entrepreneurs
  • Social Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneurs as Change Agents:
          • Adopting a mission to create and sustain social value (not just private value),
          • Recognizing and relentlessly pursuing new opportunities to serve that mission,
          • Engaging in a process of continuous innovation, adaptation, and learning,
          • Acting boldly without being limited by resources currently in hand, and
          • Exhibiting heightened accountability to the constituencies served and for the outcomes created.
    Dees, Gregory. The Meaning of &quot;Social Entrepreneurship&quot; Duke University Fuqua Business School. The Kauffman Foundation, 2001. 1-5. 6 May 2008 <http://www.12manage.com/description_corporate_responsibility.html>.
  • Activity
    • Participants are asked to work together in groups to come up with a comprehensive list of what a social entrepreneur is.
    • Participants should then look to see if they have someone like this in their organization.
    • How can entrepreneurial ideals be incorporate into their organization?
    • What can their organization do to support social entrepreneurship?
    • Engaging Individuals:
    • Fund Development
  • Giving Pyramid Major Giving Annual Giving Planned Giving Investment Involvement Interest Information Identification
  • Review: Nonprofit Revenue Structure
  • Giving Trends
    • Of the $295 billion giving in year 2006, 75.6% came from individual gifts. 4.3% came from corporations.
    • In the USA, $300 billion in donations is approximately $1,000 per person.
    Source: 2007 Giving USA
  •  
  • Fund Development planning
    • Fund development plan is a tool to assist staff assigned to develop and cultivate an organization’s resources to enable it to achieve its mission
    • A fund development plan identifies:
      • Goals
      • Strategies
      • Tasks
      • Individuals Responsible
      • Target amount raised
      • Timeline for achievement
  • Fundraising Plan
    • Plans cover:
      • Infrastructure
      • Donor relations
      • Communications
      • Fundraising activities (annual, major and planned giving) and constituencies
  • Fundraising Methods
    • Grants
    • Special events
    • Direct mail
    • Web-based fundraising
    • Telephone fundraising
    • Corporate appeal, using personal solicitation
    • Individual appeal for major gifts using personal solicitation
  • Activity
    • Participants will be asked to assess their fund development program.
    • How did their organization score?
    • What are the big questions/concerns the participants have about the assessment and/or their scores?
  • Developing your case
    • Mission
    • Goals for the organization
    • Measures to know if your organizational goals have been met
    • Organization’s history
    • Organizational structure
    • Fundraising plan
    • Financial statement
  • Timing for Fund Development Planning
    • When looking at a capital campaign
    • In alignment with the process of strategic planning
    • When there is new development staff
    • Board involvement
  • Process for Planning
    • Involvement of staff and board
    • Commitment of staff and board
    • Follow standard planning processes:
      • SWOT (strengths and weaknesses internal assessment of current programs, opportunities and threats are external)
      • Identify goals
      • Identify strategies and work plan
  • Which fundraising activities are beneficial?
    • Track costs and returns for each type of activity
    • Compute the return to investment
    • ROI= Total returns x 100
        • Total costs
  • Key components of successful development programs
    • Good information tracking (accurate names and donation amounts)
    • Donor recognition
    • Communication with donors
    • Board involvement
  •  
  • CEO 201: Leadership and Management Resources
    • Engaging Individuals: Marketing
  • What is Marketing?
    • Marketing is not public relations or publicity. Those are communications techniques to establish and circulate an image.
    • Marketing is not sales. The sale is the exchange between the organization and the constituent or the organization and the donor.
    • Marketing is not forcing a constituency to accept a pre-designed program.
  • What is Marketing? “ A continuous process of understanding. It is the simultaneous activity of a nonprofit understanding its target audiences, while helping these audiences understand the nonprofit organization.” Hoffman, Beverly R. &quot;Marketing for Charitable Nonprofit Organizations.&quot; Arch: National Respite Network . Jan. 2002. North Carolina Department of Human Resources
  • Activity
    • Participants will be asked to write down three characteristics that they find unique to their organizations.
    • Participants will divide into groups and be able to share and get direct feedback.
    • Important question to ask:
      • How can I market this to constituents?
      • What community resources can I utilize?
      • How can I start working on this marketing approach today?
  • Analysis Planning Implementation Evaluation Marketing Process Defining our constituency
        • Carefully defining constituents
        • Measuring the needs of constituents
        • Designing programs to suit those needs
        • Measuring the constituent’s satisfaction with those programs
        • Using those results to fine tune ones services regularly
        • Communicating result clearly and simply
    What Makes a Good Marketing Strategy? Hoffman, Beverly R. &quot;Marketing for Charitable Nonprofit Organizations.&quot; Arch: National Respite Network . Jan. 2002. North Carolina Department of Human Resources
  • Defining our constituency
    • External constituencies
      • Clients
      • Donors
      • Funders
      • Community members
      • Partners
      • Businesses
    • Internal Constituencies
      • Volunteers
      • Staff
  • Developing a Plan for Marketing
    • How do we want to engage our different constituencies?
    • What key messages to they want to hear?
    • How are we going to reach out to them?
  • Listening
    • It is important to develop a formal but simple way of knowing:
      • What our constituencies want to hear from us
      • What our constituencies think about us
      • What mechanisms of communication they prefer
      • How effective our efforts have been
    • Market research
      • Informal- have staff ask clients, volunteers, etc. about their experience with the organization
      • Formal- surveys and focus groups
  • Marketing
    • Products or services may have a life cycle where they face development, growth, maturity and decline
    • While commonly considered by for-profit companies, nonprofits rarely look at the life cycle of specific products or services
    Marketing Analysis
  • Marketing Analysis
    • What is the demand for our products or services?
    • How do we know what our constituencies think about us?
    • What types of messages do we send to our different constituencies?
  • Revisiting Community Engagement
    • Not a separate activity but an approach to accomplish all of our organization’s work (Gottlieb)
    • How could community engagement further our organization’s goals?
      • What are the goals of our plan?
      • Who do we need to engage?
      • What strategies will we utilize?
  • Revisiting Community Engagement
    • Case study
    • Identify ways we can engage our communities in fundraising and marketing
    • Engaging Businesses
    • What are ways that your organization is currently engaging business
  • Corporate & Non Profit Collaboration
    • Fernsler, Terrence. &quot;Collaborating Made Easy.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 32.
        • “ In times of increased competition for funding and demand for services, collaboration arrangements are a good way for one group to use the resources or expertise of another to improve program effectiveness, revenue, or visibility. The most successful collaborations involve organizations with compatible or complementary missions, mature leadership, and mutually agreed upon timelines and outcomes.”
  • Corporate Responsibility Prahalad, C.K. Harvard Business Review on Corporate Responsibility . Boston: Harvard Business School P, 2003.
  • Corporate & Non Profit Collaboration
        • Is the timing right?
        • What are the needs of the community?
        • How will it be interpreted by the public?
        • What are the restrictions (if any) to this collaboration?
        • Is this collaboration one that can be sustained?
        • Do the goals/missions of all organizations involved match-up?
        • How will this collaboration be evaluated?
    Questions to ask PRIOR to collaboration:
  • Spectrum of Partnership Wymer, Walter W., and Sridhar Samu. Nonprofit and Business Sector Collaboration . NE: The Haworth P, Inc., 2003. p.17.
    • Compatibility of your organization with your intended partner.
    • Make your expectations clear.
    • Make sure to have things in writing and on record
    • Understand all parties motivations for collaborating.
    • Conduct due diligence before formalizing a partnership.
    • Interpret the message your constituents will receive when they learn of your partnerships.
    Considerations for Partnership
  • Business Benefits from Partnership
        • Partnerships can help increase revenue.
        • Provide opportunities for their employees to practice or develop skills through volunteering.
        • Strengthen the organizational culture by placing a high value on the welfare of communities around the globe.
    Migliore, Sally. &quot;For-Profits and Nonprofits Achieve Missions Together.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 21.
        • Gain visibility and recognition for demonstrating corporate citizenship.
        • Increase community support of product by demonstrating corporate responsibility.
        • Provide opportunities for their employees to practice or develop skills through volunteering.
    Business Benefits from Partnership Migliore, Sally. &quot;For-Profits and Nonprofits Achieve Missions Together.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 21.
        • Increase individual contributions and grant funds.
        • Boost attendance in programs and events.
        • Recruit new volunteers.
        • Receive pro-bono technical expertise.
        • Gain access to potential funders and donors.
        • Raise visibility and public awareness of their mission.
        • Distribute more resources or get more services out more effectively to the community.
    Migliore, Sally. &quot;For-Profits and Nonprofits Achieve Missions Together.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 21. Nonprofit Benefits from Partnership
  • Corporate & Non Profit Collaboration
    • “ To create a sustainable and successful partnership, both the company and the nonprofit must ensure that there’s involvement and investment at all levels.”
    Maintaining a Successful Collaboration: Migliore, Sally. &quot;For-Profits and Nonprofits Achieve Missions Together.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 21. Fernsler, Terrence. &quot;Collaborating Made Easy.&quot; Nonprofit World 25 (2007): 32.
        • Create visible signs of success
        • Set clear, simple goals
        • Invite outside groups to help. (local organizations)
        • Have a continuous evaluation plan.
        • Use symbols
        • Involve stakeholders
        • Think politically without being political.
        • Keep up to date
  • Revisiting community engagement
    • Review the community engagement worksheet developed earlier.
    • Is business involved in achievement of these goals? If not, what are ways that we can better involve business?
    • Engaging Nonprofits
  • Benefits of Nonprofit Collaboration
    • Look at your resource map and identify areas for possible collaboration with other nonprofits
  • Collaboration Defined
    • Working together to achieve a common goal
    Nonprofit Collaboration & Mergers: Finding the Right Fit . University of Wisconsin- Cooperative Extension. 6 May 2008
  • The Basis for Nonprofit Collaboration
    • Reduce duplication
    • Decrease competition
    • Enhance problem solving
    • Enhance ability of communities to provide needed services
  • Collaborations in Kent County
    • Over 60 different coalitions are in place to address quality of life issues in the area
  • Kent County Collaborations Community Research Institute, 2007
  • Kent County Collaborations
  • Types of Outcomes
    • Sixty-six percent of responding coalitions indicated that they use measurable outcomes/indicators.
    • Of respondents who provided community-level (as opposed to program-level) indicators, 64% used indicators from the shared community indicators.
    • Over 100 different indicators were used by respondents; 23 of these overlap with the 50 shared community indicators.
  • Essential Elements of Nonprofit Collaboration
    • Committed Leadership
    • Unambiguous goals
    • Clearly defined roles (MOU)
    • Commitment at every level of the organization
    • Dedicated staff time
    • Sustainability in the midst of change (especially with changing leadership
    • Evaluating the process and accomplishments
    Nonprofit Collaboration & Mergers: Finding the Right Fit . University of Wisconsin- Cooperative Extension. 6 May 2008
  • Taking Stock
    • How can collaboration increase my ability to achieve my mission?
    • Discuss what may be opportunities or barriers to enhance collaboration with other nonprofits
  • Assessing our collaborations
    • Collaboration inventory tool
    • Engaging Government
  • Advocacy “ Nonprofits have the right and responsibility to engage in advocacy and lobbying activities” Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
  • Advocacy
    • What public policy issues impact your work?
    • Think about your clients, are there public policy or system issues that if resolved could impact the results of your work?
    • Issue
    • Mission
    • Constituents
    • Stakeholders
    • Success
    • Organizational Impact
    • Priority
    Step 1: Choose the Issue (s) Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
    • Set Clear Goals
      • Long Term & Short Term
    • Analyze the Issue
      • Context, Process, Problem, Strategies & Proposal
    • Analyze the Power
      • Policymakers, Constituents, Stakeholders and Interests & Knowledge holders
    • Identify Strategies and Tactics
      • Coalitions and Collaborations, Audiences, Messages, Messengers, Style
    Step 2: Develop a Preliminary Advocacy Plan Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
    • Information
    • Management
    • Timeline
    • Resources
    • Lobbying Limits
    • Political Feasibility
    • Evaluation
    Looking Inward Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
  • Advocacy Avner, Marcia. The Nonprofit Board Member's Guide to Lobbying and Advocacy . Saint Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2004.
    • Identify who in your organization makes decisions around issues, plans and strategies
    • Try out the advocacy worksheet!
  • Advocacy Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000. Make a Difference in 3 Hours a Week:
      • Advocacy doesn’t have to be a huge initiative that requires a full time task force. It can be done for a few hours a week but have a substantial affect on the organization. An organization can:
    Step 1: Prepare Your Organization for Public Policy Impact Step 2: Become a Voice for Your Cause and a Vehicle for Democracy Step 3: Increase and Sustain Your Advocacy
  • Step 1: Prepare Your Organization for Public Impact
        • Start getting educated about the laws that affect your organization
        • Have a telephone, fax, computer and file that allow you to store vital information .
        • Study the legislative process , understand how bills become laws and the budget process at the local, state and federal level.
        • Create a Who’s Who list (elected officials, judges, agencies) that your organization should be aware of.
        • Develop a board of directors that is dedicated to promoting and maintaining positive relationships with governmental leaders.
        • Take stock of human capital within your organization - key people that allow the organization to function and those willing to contact government officials.
    Step 1: Prepare Your Organization for Public Impact
  • Step 2. Become a Voice for Your Cause
      • Build a public policy presence through coalitions.
      • Become a source for reliable information.
      • Build relationships with policymakers.
      • Include community members in your endeavors. Make sure to let these people know their opinions matter.
    Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
  • Step 3: Increase and Sustain Your Advocacy
        • Meet face to face with state legislators and members of congress. “There is no form of communication as powerful as meeting in person.”
        • Know the staff of the legislator, sometimes they are the ones with the best information.
        • Use your telephone to call elected officials and ask about pending legislation and urge people on your staff to do the same
    Pierce, Kathleen. Nonprofit Policy Advocacy: Part 2, How to Advocate Effectively . Seattle University. Seattle, 2000.
    • Write letters Well written letters are one of the most influential ways of communicating with legislators. (Email is not necessarily effective.)
    • Testify When legislative committee are holding hearings make yourself available to testify so that the voice of your organization can be heard.
    • Provide tours Provide a one hour tour of your programs for elected officials and make sure to have board member present to show support.
    Step 3: Increase and Sustain Your Advocacy
  • Advocacy Avner, Marcia. The Nonprofit Board Member's Guide to Lobbying and Advocacy . Saint Paul, Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 2004.
  • CEO 201: Leadership and Management Journal Reflection Resources