U s flag etiquette revised

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U s flag etiquette revised

  1. 1. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette
  2. 2. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The traditions and customs governing the display of the US Flag are codified in the United States Code, Title 36, Chapter 10
  3. 3. Why Red, White, & Blue?Why Red, White, & Blue?  Red – Valor & Hardiness  White – Purity & Innocence  Blue – Vigilance, Perseverance, & Justice
  4. 4. Why Red, White, & Blue?Why Red, White, & Blue?  George Washington’s Legend:  Stars came from the night sky  Red from British colors  White stripes to symbolize secession from home (England).
  5. 5. Raising and Lowering the FlagRaising and Lowering the Flag On a Flag Pole – Raise the flag briskly, lower it slowly. – At half mast, raise it to the top of the pole, then lower it to half mast. – When lowering from half mast, first raise it back to the top of the pole, then lower it slowly. – Memorial Day, fly the flag at half mast until noon, then raise it to full staff for the rest of the day.
  6. 6. Flag EtiquetteFlag Etiquette When to Fly the FlagWhen to Fly the Flag Every day, when weather permits, or in any weather if the flag is made of weather- resistant material. All national and state holidays. Sunrise to sunset, unless properly illuminated.
  7. 7. Flag EtiquetteFlag Etiquette Displaying the FlagDisplaying the Flag  At different heights, the U.S. flag flies higher than the others. It is raised first and lowered last.  At equal heights, the U.S. flag is either in front of or farthest to the right of the other flags.  When displayed flat against a wall, horizontally or vertically, the blue field is at the top, at the flag’s own right (to the left as you look at it).  In an auditorium, the flag is placed to the speaker’s right when on the stage, or to the audiences’ right if on the floor.
  8. 8. Flag EtiquetteFlag Etiquette Carrying the FlagCarrying the Flag  Aloft and flying free.  When the flag is alone, there should be an honor guard to the left of it or one on each side of it.  With other flags, the U.S. flag in front of the others or to the right if the flags are in a line.  Never dip the flag of the United States for any person or thing.
  9. 9. Flag EtiquetteFlag Etiquette Greeting the FlagGreeting the Flag  Stand and salute the flag when: – Raised or lowered on a staff – You pass it – It passes you – Pledge of Allegiance – National Anthem
  10. 10. Flag EtiquetteFlag Etiquette SalutingSaluting  Read your handbook  A salute should only be given when in uniform.  When you are not wearing a uniform, place your hand over your heart in lieu of a salute. (In times past, scouts were taught to salute over their heart when not in uniform. This is still an acceptable, though not frequently seen alternative.)
  11. 11. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag should never touch the ground or floor beneath it.
  12. 12. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  Do you have to destroy the flag if it touches the ground accidentally?  No. You should, of course, try to avoid having the flag touch the ground. But if it does, you should correct the situation immediately.
  13. 13. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag may be flown at half staff (mast) by order of the president, usually to mourn the death of a public official.
  14. 14. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property
  15. 15. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag should not be used as part of a costume or athletic uniform, except that a flag patch may be used on the uniform of military personnel, fireman, policeman and members of patriotic organizations
  16. 16. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature
  17. 17. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  The flag should never be used as wearing apparel
  18. 18. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left
  19. 19. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left
  20. 20. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it should be suspended vertically with the union to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street.
  21. 21. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When displayed on or off a podium, the flag of the United States of America should hold the position of superior prominence, in advance of the audience, and in the position of honor at the speaker's right as he faces the audience.
  22. 22. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When the flag becomes old and tattered, it should be destroyed by burning.
  23. 23. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When the flag becomes old and tattered, it should be destroyed by burning.
  24. 24. U.S. Flag EtiquetteU.S. Flag Etiquette  When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. The flag should not be lowered into the grave or allowed to touch the ground.
  25. 25. Is burning the U.S. flagIs burning the U.S. flag in protest a crime?in protest a crime?
  26. 26. Is burning the U.S. flag inIs burning the U.S. flag in protest a crime?protest a crime? No. Despite several attempts each year by members of the House of Representatives to pass an amendment to overrule Supreme Court decisions allowing the burning of the U.S. flag as a First Amendment right, it fails to be passed by the Senate.
  27. 27. Standard Elements ofStandard Elements of Flag CeremoniesFlag Ceremonies Flag Bearers Color Guards Color Guard Commander Other participants – Bugler – Drummer – Readers / Speakers
  28. 28. Flag BearerFlag Bearer  The person who carries the flag  one flag per person.  Hold staff at slight angle in front of the body or hold the folded flag in front of the body at waist level.  stands silent at attention throughout the ceremony  does not recite the Pledge, Oath, Laws nor sing
  29. 29. Color GuardColor Guard  Guards the honor of the flag (does not touch ground)  Stands beside the flag bearer or to each side if in a line of more than one flag.  Two per flag is traditional, but any number ok.  Stand silent at attention throughout the ceremony  Do salute during the Pledge, otherwise stand still.
  30. 30. Color Guard CommanderColor Guard Commander  Designated person “calls out” the parts of the ceremony.  Stands in front of or to one side of the audience.  Typically the Patrol Leader, but not required
  31. 31. MusiciansMusicians  Buglers play To The Colors when posting the colors and Retreat when retiring the colors.  Drummers play a roll when posting or retiring the colors.  Other instruments or groups play The Star Spangled Banner or other patriotic tune as appropriate. – As the colors are raised briskly and retrieved slowly, so should be the tune and tempo.
  32. 32. CallsCalls Commands given by the Color Guard Commander for the benefit and education of those not entirely familiar with the ceremony. They should be spoken clearly and loudly. With a properly trained unit, only four calls are required; “Attention”, “Salute”, “Two” and “At Ease”.

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