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The SCOPE Planning Model

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For generations in marketing and business we’ve used the SWOT model to provide an initial analysis and classification of the issues facing a business as it starts to evaluate it’s position and devise …

For generations in marketing and business we’ve used the SWOT model to provide an initial analysis and classification of the issues facing a business as it starts to evaluate it’s position and devise strategy. It has served us well since its inception in the 1960s with it’s simplicity, functionality and intuitiveness; remaining un-changed and un-equivocal for over 40 years. It provides a useful tool for segmenting internal and external factors into positives and negatives, yet in doing so it can be limiting in it’s scope to introduce wider factors which could or should come into play when developing our plans.
Most executives merely use the SWOT as a method of grouping factors into the 4 buckets, with limited conscious effort to align internal Strengths to specific external Opportunities, or to understand Weaknesses in regard to mitigating Threats. In this respect, the SWOT doesn’t provide a progression in it’s strategic development. I’d therefore like to put forward the SCOPE planning model for consideration as an alternative to SWOT:

S – SITUATION: Rear-view pertaining conditions which have a relevant and material impact on the planning decision with regards to internal or external environmental factors.

C – CORE COMPETENCIES: Unique strengths and abilities of the business which provide the fundamental basis for the provision of added value to customers and are critical to the delivery of competitive advantage.

O – OBSTACLES: Potential issues and threats that could jeopardize the realisation of future Prospects.

P – PROSPECTS: Possibilities, chances and opportunities existing both internally or externally to the business which have an apparent probability of enhanced sales and / or profits created through the leveraging of its Core Competencies.

E – EXPECTATIONS: Future-view anticipated developments in internal and external conditions that could materially influence or impact the delivery of plans to meet the identified Prospects.

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  • For generations in marketing and business we’ve used the SWOT model to provide an initial analysis and classification of the issues facing a business as it starts to evaluate it’s position and devise strategy. It has served us well since its inception in the 1960s with it’s simplicity, functionality and intuitiveness; remaining un-changed and un-equivocal for over 40 years. It provides a useful tool for segmenting internal and external factors into positives and negatives, yet in doing so it can be limiting in it’s scope to introduce wider factors which could or should come into play when developing our plans.Most executives merely use the SWOT as a method of grouping factors into the 4 buckets, with limited conscious effort to align internal Strengths to specific external Opportunities, or to understand Weaknesses in regard to mitigating Threats. In this respect, the SWOT doesn’t provide a progression in it’s strategic development. I’d therefore like to put forward the SCOPE planning model for consideration as an alternative to SWOT.
  • SITUATION: Rear-view pertaining conditions which have a relevant and material impact on the planning decision with regards to internal or external environmental factors.The Situation provides an outline and understanding of the prevailing conditions upon which the strategic plan is to be developed. It should consider both internal and external factors which have led the business to its current status, and which have a bearing on the identification of future opportunities, trends and plans.
  • CORE COMPETENCIES: Unique strengths and abilities of the business which provide the fundamental basis for the provision of added value to customers and are critical to the delivery of competitive advantage.Core Competencies are specific factors that a business sees as being central to the way it operates which fulfil 3 key criteria:1. Are not easy for competitors to imitate, i.e. are unique2. Can be leveraged across products and markets3. Contribute to the end consumer’s experienced benefits, i.e. add valueIn these respects, Core Competencies provide the fundamental basis for the business achieving a competitive advantage in it’s defined market given the pertaining conditions.
  • OBSTACLES: Potential issues and threats that could jeopardize the realisation of future Prospects.Obstacles may be either internal or external, and reflect specific issues which need to be addressed if the business is to realise future Prospects. In this respect, they shouldn’t necessarily be defined as either a “Weakness” or “Threat” but rather be perceived as hurdles to the plan to be overcome over the duration. “Weaknesses” imply longer-term systemic issues causing a strategic disadvantage. Obstacles are shorter-term situations that need to be resolved.
  • PROSPECTS: Possibilities, chances and opportunities existing both internally or externally to the business which have an apparent probability of enhanced sales and / or profits created through the leveraging of its Core Competencies.Prospects are chances for the business to create additional sales and / or profits by taking advantage of its Core Competencies in the context of its Situation. Identification of Prospects provides the foundation for both goal setting and strategic development going forward.
  • EXPECTATIONS: Future-view anticipated developments in internal and external conditions that could materially influence or impact the delivery of plans to meet the identified Prospects.Prospects are chances for the business to create additional sales and / or profits by taking advantage of its Core Competencies in the context of its Situation. Identification of Prospects provides the foundation for both goal setting and strategic development going forward.
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    • 1. ThebySCOPE Planning ModelCreated John Webb 1
    • 2. The SCOPE Planning Model SITUATION • Rear-view pertaining conditions which have a relevant and material impact on the planning decision with regards to internal or external environmental factors. The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 CORE COMPETENCIES OBSTACLES • Unique strengths and abilities of the business which • Potential issues and threats that could jeopardize provide the fundamental basis for the provision of the realisation of future Prospects. added value to customers and are critical to the delivery of competitive advantage. PROSPECTS EXPECTATIONS • Possibilities, chances and opportunities existing • Future-view anticipated developments in internal both internally or externally to the business which and external conditions that could materially have an apparent probability of enhanced sales and influence or impact the delivery of plans to meet / or profits created through the leveraging of its the identified Prospects. Core Competencies. 2in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 3. PROSPECTS The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 SITUATION CORE EXPECTATIONS COMPETENCIES OBSTACLES 3in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 4. Situation • An outlining and understanding of the pertaining conditions upon which the strategic plan is to be developed The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 • Rear-view perspective • Internal or external environmental factors that have led the business to it’s current status and position: − Have a relevant and material impact on the planning decisions to be made − Have a bearing on the identification of future opportunities, trends and plans 4in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 5. Core Competencies • Specific aspects or elements that the business sees as being central to the way it operates The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 • Fulfill 3 criteria: − Are not easy for competitors to imitate – are unique − Can be leveraged across products and markets − Contribute to the end consumers’ experienced benefits – add value • Provide basis for achieving and sustaining competitive advantage 5in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 6. Obstacles • Issues which need to be addressed if the business is to realise future Prospects The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 • Hurdles to be overcome over the duration of the plan • May be internal or external 6in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 7. Prospects • Chances for the business to create additional sales and / or profits by taking advantage of its Core Competencies in the context of its Situation The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 • Identification of Prospects provides the foundation for both goal setting and strategic development going forward 7in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 8. Expectations • Future-view perspective • What does the business see happening in the future that could have The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 either a direct or indirect influence on the execution of the plan or impact the favourable achievement of the defined Prospects − Anticipated developments − Quantifiable and / or subjective predictions 8in2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 9. How To Use SCOPE • SCOPE is a multi-dimensional planning tool taking into consideration: − Past, present and future conditions − Internal and external factors − Advantages and dis-advantages • It is part of a wider process • It is a dynamic rather than a static tool – it is intended to be an ongoing, iterative, live exercise – not a one-off • The categories in SCOPE are inter-linked and relevant to each other • They should not be treated as ‘pigeon-holes’; each element has to have a purpose and value in informing and directing the ultimate 9 strategic planin2-marketing.com | @WebbJS
    • 10. www. in2-marketing.com in2marketing.wordpress.com The SCOPE Planning Model © John Webb 2011 @WebbJS uk.linkedin.com/in/johnwebb slideshare.net/johns_webb mail@johnwebb.me 10
    • 11. in2MARKETINGinnovation intrapreneurship marketing 11