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The jesuit relations Post 7
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The jesuit relations Post 7 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Jesuit Relations
    By John Martyn
  • 2. Introduction
    The Jesuit Relations are a group of documents that constitute some of the best first hand accounts of New France, or North America. The Jesuits, or the society of Jesus, were a group of missionaries that formed an order that took on especially difficult missions. They tended toward intellectualism and founded academic institutions and medical centers.
  • 3. The Society of Jesus in Europe and abroad
    Headquartered in Rome, the Jesuits were an order of Catholic priests that took vows of poverty and devoted themselves to humanitarian causes. The annual reports were popular with paritioners in Europe, as well as with the intelligence and church fathers. News of the world was rare andexciting.
  • 4. Chapter 1Montaagnais Hunters of the northern woodlands
    Paul Le Jeune wrote a piece in 1634 that one might call an ethnographic description of people and groups he encountered in Canada. He and his party was led by a guide named Mestigoit, a montagnais following his bandto hunting grounds in northern Appalachia, now called Quebec.
  • 5. On the good things which are found among the indians
    “They profess never to get angry, though not because of the beauty of this virtue, for which they have not even a name, but rather for their own contentment and happiness. In other words, they want only to free themselves from the bitterness caused by anger.” Paul Le Jeune
  • 6. 1636 of the order, the hurons observe in their councils
    “Each speaker ends his speech with …’that is my thought on the subject’ and then the whole assembly responds with a very strong respiration drawn from the pit of the stomach, HAAU….” Jean De Brebeuf
  • 7. The Huron feast of the dead
    Brebeuf was fortunate in his timing to witness an event celebrated only every 12 years. This ceremonywas a gathering of all the Huron people.
  • 8. Chapter 4Peace Negotiations at 3 rivers, 1645
    A treaty was reached between the French Iroquois and other northern nations. This was an amiable gathering, but by no means stopped the mounting tensions and the Iroquois continued to attack the Algonquins.
  • 9. The Hurons annihilated, 1649
    Iroquois raiders became bent on utter destruction of the Huron nation. After years of inflicting moderate damage during attacks on the Huron villages, their enemies successfully wiped them out from settlements near the 3 rivers and to the west. They were taken by surprise after a long winter.
  • 10. Chapter 6Mission to the Iroqois
    After many difficult years, it is thought that a large fragment of the mohawk society, in hopes of more security, decided to form lasting ties with the Europeans. In New York, they got in with the English.
  • 11. The Conversion of the Mohawk
    Other Mohawks sought ties with French missionaries in St. Louis and the lower Iroqois territory. “I intend to do away with the peculiar ignorance in which they live, “ Jean Pierron