AP Euro CH 21 Part 1
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AP Euro CH 21 Part 1

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This presentation focuses on the background to the revolution up to the uprisings in the various colonies.

This presentation focuses on the background to the revolution up to the uprisings in the various colonies.

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AP Euro CH 21 Part 1 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CH 21: The Revolution in Politics (1775-1815)
    AP European History
    Magister Ricard
  • 2. Questions to Consider
    What was the main cause of the financial crisis in France?
    What was the plan to solve the financial crisis?
    What is the National Assembly and what was the kings response to it?
    Why and when did the Parisians storm the Bastille?
    How did Parisian women further the revolution?
  • 3. Background to Revolution
    CH 21: The Revolution in Politics (1775-1815)
  • 4. Legal Orders and Social Change
    France’s population was divided into three orders or estates
    Those who pray – clergy (1st Estate)
    Those who fight – nobility (2nd Estate)
    Those who work – everyone else (3rd Estate)
    Growing tensions between nobility and bourgeoisie help shape events leading to revolution
    Bourgeoisie felt they were not peasants and should have privileges like 2nd Estate
    But there are other influences that new research brings to light
  • 5. The Crisis of Political Legitimacy
    A century of political and fiscal struggle precedes the revolution
    Between 1715-1723, institutions regain power they lost under Louis XIV
    Efforts to impose new taxes after the War of Austrian Succession were opposed by Parlement of Paris
    Louis XV official Rene de Maupeou led a royal backlash against the parlements, charges of “loyal despotism”
    Scandalous pamphlets contributed to desacralization of monarchy
  • 6. The Impact of the American Revolution
    England defeats France in Seven Years’ War, desires to increase taxes to pay for war
    American colonists oppose tax increases
    Dispute over taxation and representation flare up during 1760’s-1770’s
    Colonies moved toward open rebellion and a declaration of independence starting in 1775
    French support colonists against foe England
    In 1783 the American Revolution ended with the Treaty of Paris
    Europeans became fascinated by the American Revolution
    Inspired French intellectuals
    France saw Britain defeated, humbled, but itself fiscally drained
  • 7. Financial Crisis
    By 1780s half of France’s budget went towards paying interest on national debt
    Could not survive a declaration of bankruptcy
    France had no national bank, could not print money to cover its own debt
    Had to reform tax system to bring increased revenue
    King convened Assembly of Notable to gain support for new taxes
    Assembly refused to support new taxes, dismissed the king
    King established taxes by decree
    Negative reaction forced king to call meeting of Estates General
  • 8. Revolution in Metropole and Colony (1789-1791)
    CH 21: The Revolution in Politics (1775-1815)
  • 9. The Formation of the National Assembly
    Prior to the meeting of the Estates General, a list of grievances were compiled
    Featured considerable popular participation
    Intense debate forced the Third Estate to leave the assembly of Estates General
    Declared itself the National Assembly in June 1789
    Louis XVI’s response was “nothing”
  • 10. The Revolt of the Poor and Oppressed
    Bad harvests lead to starvation, hunger, and unemployment
    Poor protested to prevent dismissal of king’s finance minister
    July 13, 1789 the Bastille was stormed, destroyed
    Peasant uprisings resulted in the Great Fear
    Gave National Assembly credibility, abolished feudal dues and other peasant obligations (August 1789)
  • 11. A Limited Monarchy
    August 1789, National Assembly issues a Declaration of the Rights of Man
    “Men are born and remain free and equal in rights”
    Several thousand women rush Versailles and force king and royal family to move to Paris
    National Assembly creates a constitutional monarchy
    A new constitution would go into effect in 1791
    Peasants react negatively to National Assembly’s attempt to increase state control over Catholic Church
  • 12. Revolutionary Aspirations in Saint-Domingue
    Slaves majority of population in Saint-Domingue
    Free population was divided by color and wealth
    Turmoil of the 1780s challenged the status quo
    National Assembly sides with white planters
    Each colony gets right to draft its own constitution
    July 1790, Vincent Oge leads a failed attempt to rebel against colonial authorities
    Compromises proposed by National Assembly failed to satisfy the contradictory ambitions in the colonies
  • 13. Questions to Consider
    What was the main cause of the financial crisis in France?
    What was the plan to solve the financial crisis?
    What is the National Assembly and what was the kings response to it?
    Why and when did the Parisians storm the Bastille?
    How did Parisian women further the revolution?