Supporting Sustainable Living:
Aware Homes and Smart Occupants
UbiComp 2010: Ubiquitous Computing for Sustainable Energy W...
Research Framework
• Support sustainable decision-making through awareness and feedback
• Recognize that awareness alone d...
Key Principles
• Need to move from a model of expert management to one of
aware occupancy
• Enable the smart occupant, rat...
Projects
• Two major sustainable housing projects
• Have been visited by over 125,000 people
• North House (2008-2009)
• N...
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Design Rationale
• Provide rich, real-time feedback
• Present information in contextually appropriate ways
• Enable efficie...
ALIS: Aware Living Interface System
• Combines feedback and control systems
• Awareness + opportunity for change
• Include...
Supporting Sustainability in the Home
Community
Resource Production
Resource Use
Feedback
Awareness
Attitude Change
Behavi...
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
Key Findings
• More information alone does not solve the problem
• we can’t expect people to check their laptop every time...
Contacts and Further Information
Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
http://hcssl.iat.sfu.ca
Lyn Bartram
lyn@sfu...
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Supporting Sustainable Living: Aware Homes and Smart Occupants

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Awareness of resource consumption in the home is a key part of reducing our ecological footprint, yet lack of appropriate understanding and motivation often deters residents from behaviour change. We report on the design and implementation an in-home system that supports residents in awareness of resource use, facilitates efficient control of house systems, and encourages conservation in daily activities. Initial responses from deployments in two high-profile sustainable homes indicate the potential this holistic approach has in engaging residents in sustainable living. We present the design rationale for our approach, and discuss the challenges and opportunities we have addressed.

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Supporting Sustainable Living: Aware Homes and Smart Occupants

  1. 1. Supporting Sustainable Living: Aware Homes and Smart Occupants UbiComp 2010: Ubiquitous Computing for Sustainable Energy Workshop September 26th, 2010 Lyn Bartram Johnny Rodgers Rob Woodbury Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living Simon Fraser University School of Interactive Arts + Technology Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
  2. 2. Research Framework • Support sustainable decision-making through awareness and feedback • Recognize that awareness alone does not equal behaviour change • Reduce effort required to “do the right thing” Cost > Benefit = Change • If the perceived cost, in terms of time, effort, or money, is greater than the perceived benefit, sustained change will not occur • How do we lower the cost and increase the benefit? • How do we change perceptions? Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  3. 3. Key Principles • Need to move from a model of expert management to one of aware occupancy • Enable the smart occupant, rather than building a ‘smart home’ • Integrating control and feedback technology into the home requires new techniques and a sensitivity to the unique constraints and affordances of a residential setting • we can’t just import existing techniques wholesale • we can’t “design for cardboard cutouts” • Feedback on the wall is going to help residents answer some questions, but not all of them Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  4. 4. Projects • Two major sustainable housing projects • Have been visited by over 125,000 people • North House (2008-2009) • Net-positive (production > consumption) solar-powered home • Sophisticated automation systems and passive optimization • Placed 4th overall in the Solar Decathlon 2009 in Washington D.C. • West House (2009-2012) • Small footprint laneway home incorporating renewable energy • Commercially available technology (aside from ALIS) • Showcased at the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  5. 5. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  6. 6. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  7. 7. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  8. 8. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  9. 9. Design Rationale • Provide rich, real-time feedback • Present information in contextually appropriate ways • Enable efficient resource use by reducing control friction • Use ambient, aesthetically-pleasing indicators of resource use • Reduce complexity by leveraging familiar tools • Simplify resident interaction with optimization and automation systems Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  10. 10. ALIS: Aware Living Interface System • Combines feedback and control systems • Awareness + opportunity for change • Includes at-a-glance and detailed feedback, social networking features, embedded and mobile control, optimization and house presets • Distributed across four platforms • Embedded touch panels, web application, mobile application, ambient informative art Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  11. 11. Supporting Sustainability in the Home Community Resource Production Resource Use Feedback Awareness Attitude Change Behaviour Change Habit-Forming Embodied Knowledge Sustainability Information and Visualization Ecosystem Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  12. 12. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  13. 13. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  14. 14. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  15. 15. Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  16. 16. Key Findings • More information alone does not solve the problem • we can’t expect people to check their laptop every time they have a question • Numerous issues to be resolved concerning aesthetics, ergonomics, visibility, and appropriate attentional requirements of feedback • Need to support both tactical (in-the-moment) and strategic (long term) decisions • Automation is problematic: residents are wary of domestic systems that make decisions for them • need to find balance between occupant control and efficiency Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living
  17. 17. Contacts and Further Information Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living http://hcssl.iat.sfu.ca Lyn Bartram lyn@sfu.ca Johnny Rodgers jgr3@sfu.ca http://johnny.hcssl.iat.sfu.ca Rob Woodbury rw@sfu.ca Human Centered Systems for Sustainable Living http://www.team-north.com http://westhouse.sfu.ca

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