Reshaping workplace design to facilitate better learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Reshaping workplace design to facilitate better learning

on

  • 1,179 views

Invited talk 24th April, 2013. Division of Learning Technologies, George Mason University, USA. http://it.gse.gmu.edu/johncook

Invited talk 24th April, 2013. Division of Learning Technologies, George Mason University, USA. http://it.gse.gmu.edu/johncook

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,179
Views on SlideShare
905
Embed Views
274

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
8
Comments
0

2 Embeds 274

http://learning-layers.eu 269
https://twitter.com 5

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Reshaping workplace design to facilitate better learning Reshaping workplace design to facilitate better learning Presentation Transcript

    • 1http://Learning-Layers-eu – Scaling up Technologies for Informal Learning in SME Clusters – layers@learning-layers.euhttp://learning-layers.eu/ – Scaling up Technologies for Informal Learning in SME ClustersA Design Research Approach to Investigating NetworkedScaffolding in the Learning Layers Project – Using SocialMedia and Mobile Devices to Scale Informal Work-BasedLearningInvited talk 24th April, 2013. Division of Learning Technologies, George Mason University, USA.http://it.gse.gmu.edu/johncookProfessor John Cook,Director of Bristol Centre for Research in LifelongLearning and Education,University of the West of England1
    • Or …Reshaping workplace design tofacilitate better learning2http://mashable.com/2011/08/08/mobile-workers-infographic/
    • Structure• The opportunity• Informal learning atwork place• Design research• Layers project• Examples from Layers• Methodologicalreflections• Q&A3
    • 4The opportunity• Develop and use new technologies,collaborative work practices and methods:– Increase effectiveness in Lifelong learningof current workforce– Increase use of workplace as learning site forinnovation and on demand individual, groupand network learning– Help to reshape workplace design tofacilitate better learning
    • 5http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324034804578350852590865198.html―The mobile revolution—whichhas changed life in so manyways, from getting drivingdirections to sharing photos—isseeping into corporatetechnology.‖ March 11, 2013
    • Informal Learning at Work place• In Cook & Pachler (2012) paper– Focus on literature that is empirically founded• Given the significance and internal coherence of Eraut‘swork– We use it as a basis for our conceptual thinking• Eraut‘s work (2000, 2004, 2007, 2008) also has beenderived mainly from– Study of professionals and– Graduate employees– Rather than workers more widely6Cook, J. and Pachler, N. (2012). Online People Tagging: Social (Mobile) Network(ing) Services and Work-basedLearning. British Journal of Education Technology, 43(5), 711–725. Link to paper http://tinyurl.com/8ktmuau
    • • Learning in workplace viewed as responseto complex problem or task• Embedded in meaningful and authenticcultural contexts7
    • A typology of Early Career Learning(Source: Eraut, 2008, p. 18)8
    • Informal learning at work place(Cook and Pachler, 2012)a. individual self-efficacy (confidence and commitment) (Eraut, 2004, p. 269)i. feedbackii. supportiii. challengeiv. value of the workb. acts of self-regulation (Dabbagh and Kitsantas, 2011)i. competence (perceived self-efficacy)ii. relatedness (sense of being a part of the activity)iii. acceptance (social approval)c. cognitive load (Huang et al., 2011)i. intrinsic (inherent nature of the materials and learners‘ prior knowledge)ii. extraneous (improper instructional design)iii. germane (appropriate instructional design motivates)d. personal learning networks (group or distributed self-regulation) (Rajagopal, et al., 2012)i. building connections (adding new people to the network so that there are resources available when a learning need arises);ii. maintaining connections (keeping in touch with relevant persons); andiii. activating connections (with selected persons for the purpose of learning)iv. aggregated trustworthiness (perceived credibility) = social validation + authority and trustee + profiles (Jessen andJørgensen, 2012)9
    • Informal learning at work place(Cook and Pachler, 2012)a. individual self-efficacy (confidence and commitment) (Eraut, 2004, p. 269)i. feedbackii. supportiii. challengeiv. value of the workb. acts of self-regulation (Dabbagh and Kitsantas, 2011)i. competence (perceived self-efficacy)ii. relatedness (sense of being a part of the activity)iii. acceptance (social approval)c. cognitive load (Huang et al., 2011)i. intrinsic (inherent nature of the materials and learners‘ prior knowledge)ii. extraneous (improper instructional design)iii. germane (appropriate instructional design motivates)d. personal learning networks (group or distributed self-regulation) (Rajagopal, et al., 2012)i. building connections (adding new people to the network so that there are resources available when a learning need arises);ii. maintaining connections (keeping in touch with relevant persons); andiii. activating connections (with selected persons for the purpose of learning)iv. aggregated trustworthiness (perceived credibility) = social validation + authority and trustee + profiles (Jessen andJørgensen, 2012)10
    • Design research• Design Research (e.g. Bannan-Ritland, 2009) is a form of inquiry that– Positions us to hypothesize and test a solution for the problem in context– Engages with the design process to uncover ideas about• Learning• Performance,• Behavior and• Cognition as part of the inquiry process– Produces both theories and practical educational interventions as itsoutcomes– More recently introduced as a modern approach suitable to• Address complex problems in educational practice• For which no clear guidelines or solutions are available11Bannan-Ritland, B. (2009). The Integrative Learning Design Framework: An Illustrated Example from the Domain of InstructionalTechnology. In T. Plomp & N. Nieveen (Eds.), An Introduction to Educational Design Research
    • 12Layers Project: ConsortiumProject CoordinationTechnology ResearchRegional Application ClustersScaling PartnersTechnology PartnersHealth Care – LeedsConstruction &Building – Bremen
    • Scaling through Clusters?• ―… geographically proximate group ofinterconnected companies and associatedinstitutions in a particular field, linked bycommonalities and complementarities (externaleconomies)‖ (Porter, 2008)• Important to distinguish– Managed Clusters from– Unmanaged clusters or agglomerations/lumps with noorganisation or team working on behalf of the clustermembers to get them to move in the same direction13Michael E. Porter (2008). Clusters, Innovation, and Competitiveness: New Findings and Implications for Policy.Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness Harvard Business School. Presentation Stockholm, Sweden
    • 14Clustersthe Layers scaling strategy• Research and develop solutions by workingwith Excellence clusters and clusterpolicy makers– Piloting in Healthcare and construction.– Involve new clusters in new countries• Build sustainability beyond project horizonby promoting a network of EducationInnovation Clusters to serve other clusterswith services and technologies to speeduptake of new learning methods and techn.
    • 15How we organize
    • 16Timeline for our work
    • 17Scaling Layers 2012-2016
    • Examples from Layers• Open design library– Ethnographic study and resulting user storiesthat describe current practices at theworkplace– Tools to inspire design, e.g. using the networksection of the MoLE app from Tribal, atechnical partner– Wire frames & story boards• Co-design: application partner days, OpenDesign Conference, Design Teams 18
    • Case of scaling in ProfessionalLearning Networks• For TEL to be adopted on a large-scale itneeds to– Address empirically based ‗systemic painpoints‘– If addressed have the potential to attractsignificant take up by other groups ofprofessionals who face the same problem– Cook et al. (submitted)• Extends the Bannan‘s ILDF phase of‗Informed Exploration‘ 19
    • Networked Scaffolding –Interacting with People• Work package 2 called NetworkedScaffolding – Interacting with People– From outset taken a Design Researchapproach (Cook, 2002) to the development ofscaling through Professional LearningNetworks– Cook and Pachler (2012) framework being useas a starting point for designing support tobuild locally trusted Personal LearningNetworks20Cook, J. (2002). The Role of Dialogue in Computer-Based Learning and Observing Learning: An Evolutionary Approach to Theory.Journal of Interactive Media in Education, 5. Paper online: http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/jime/article/viewArticle/41
    • Networked Scaffolding –Interacting with People– As a worker‘s or group‘s connections and confidencegrow, they build what we are calling a ProfessionalLearning Network.– First stage of scaling is the• Building,• Maintaining and• Activating Personal Learning Networks– Second stage is where professionals move from localtrusted personal networks• Out into wider networks that can potentially include anyone– This is what we are calling Professional LearningNetworks21
    • PANDORA Design Team -Health example• In the UK, health sector national guidelines arepublished by NICE (http://www.nice.org.uk/) inthree areas– Use of health technologies– Clinical practice– Guidance for public sector workers on Healthpromotion and ill-health avoidance• Guidelines are interpreted locally byGeneral Practitioners (GPs) and used inlocal Health Practices.22
    • PANDORA Design Team• Communicating these ‗local livingguidelines‘ can be a problem:– “… with guidelines coming in day by day, weekby week you don’t sit down and work out whoto communicate them with. And then it justdefaults to who you’re chatty with or who is inyour immediate circle.”– Quotes from focus groups (Feb 2013); part ofLayers Ethnographic Study (WP1)23
    • PANDORA Design Team• The Network section of the MoLE app• Tribal are working within the NetworkedScaffolding – Interacting with People workpackage)• Possibility to create a set of relevantcontacts to assist an individual during apost disaster situation24
    • 25
    • PANDORA Design Team• Expert reviews• Head of GP Practice 1 using wireframes• Pandora as a system to support– Sharing– Discussion and– Development of guideline implementation plans– Within and between practices (picture 1)• He can see that the system could be very useful– Would support learning across practices– Would help by focusing discussion on a clear topic26
    • 27
    • PANDORA Design Team• Pandora as a way of supporting– Asking and giving of advice– Related to particular patient cases (see picture 2)• Trust and motivation are key to making this work28
    • 29
    • PANDORA Design Team• Expert Feedback on design ideas from 2nd Practice• If change guidelines and everyone coming up individual Practice plan– May be leverage in sharing across Practices?– Possible learning between practices?• Not same process as Practice 1, in Practice 2 one GP undertook all changes• Thus any system we propose needs to be flexible• Cascading training from conferences to others in practices has a lot ofinterest (e.g. user story 1 ethnographic study)– How do we support this even if they dont have f-2-f practice education meeting?– We could use our systems to provide a substitute• Three nurses said would find helpful to get alerts about changes in guidelinestailored to them– Tailored to type of clinic they are about to go into– Highlight where things have changed (different levels of medication)30
    • PANDORA Design Team• A key to various visualizations that are beingdeveloped for co-design is to specify the differentlevels of trust accorded to the contacts– Close, trusted, everyone, anyone– In one design these can be color coded so that theuser can also set time parameters for a response• The intervention of these design artifact has theintention of providing a ‗tool for thinking‘ in co-design31
    • Methodological reflections• PANDORA is tied to the design process through– Theory– Designs for scale– Empirical evidence– Co-design• So that it provide support for– Creating,– Maintaining– Activating• Personal and Professional Learning Networks32
    • Methodological reflections33Cook, J., Bauters, M., Colley, J., Bannan, B., Schmidt, A. and Leinonen, T. (submitted). Towards a Design Research Framework for Scaling the use ofTEL to Support Informal Work-Based Learning, EC-TEL (European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning), Cyprus, September 2013.
    • 34More info• http://learning-layers.eu/• http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1176688&trk=tab_pro• http://westengland.academia.edu/JohnCook/About• http://www.mendeley.com/profiles/john-cook6/• http://twitter.com/johnnigelcook• http://www.slideshare.net/johnnigelcook• http://westengland.academia.edu/JohnCook• @johnnigelcook
    • Acknowledgement• Thanks to Tor-Arne Bellika for letting mereuse a few of his slides• Learning Layers is a 7th Framework Large-scale integrating project co-funded by theEuropean Commission; Grant AgreementNumber 318209; http://learning-layers.eu/35
    • Thank you• Q&A36