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Designing for Digital Learners (D4DL) Research Group overview

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  • 17 London Metropolitan University10.80FTE1040351502.4558University of the West of England, Bristol12.50FTE510503501.85 
  • Onetask, which is triggered when the mobile phone is in the correct GPS location on the site (at the Abbey), stated:“Look at a movie [see Figure 1] of the reconstruction of the interior of the church including the Nine Altars.Discuss the evolution of the structure of the abbey. Make a video blog of your discussion using the Nokiaphone.”
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    • 1. John Cook UWE Bristol Designing for Digital Learners (D4DL) Research Group D4DL: http://cloudworks.ac.uk/cloudscape/view/2435 Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/johnnigelcook
    • 2. Overview D4DL Conduct interdisciplinary research in Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL), investigation of the mediating power of social media, mobile devices, and more generally TEL, for Learning, innovation, creativity and social justice Educational Design Research approach
    • 3. Bad press for ‘new’ technology People thought the first printing press was an instrument of the devil that would spawn unauthorised versions of the bible. David Crystal (Guardian, 2008), author of „Txtng: the gr8db8‟ (Crystal, 2008) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printing_press
    • 4. The telephone created fears of a breakdown in family life, with people no longer speaking directly to one another. http://www.solarnavigator.net/inventors/inventor_images/alexander_graham_bell_1876_speaking_into_telephone.jpg
    • 5. And radio and television raised concerns about brain-washing. http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~postr/MRT/Tour1.htm http://blog.lib.umn.edu/mors0106/architecture/Television.jpg
    • 6. Mobile phones can damage your health? txt spk is responsible for bad spelling and moral decay? As always there is more to it than meets the eye …
    • 7. Six Principles that guide D4DL
    • 8. 6 Principles - Summary 1. It is a democratic right to have equity of access to cultural resources (widely defined). 2. Mobile phones are new cultural resources that operate within an individualised, mobile and convergent mass communication system. 3. Users are actively engaged in ‘generating’ their own content and contexts for learning. This principle is summarised as ‘user-generated contexts’. 4. Appropriation is the key for the recognition of mobile devices (as well as the artefacts accessed through and produced with them) as cultural resources in and across different cultural practices of use, in particular everyday life and formal education. 5. There is a significant potential for the use of social media and mobile devices in informal, professional, work-based learning. 6. Social media and mobile devices can be used to design transformative, augmented contexts for learning.
    • 9. Principle 1: It is a democratic right to have equity of access to cultural resources (widely defined). Cook, J., Pachler, N. and Bachmair, B. (2012). Using Social Networked Sites and Mobile Technology for Bridging Social Capital. In Guglielmo Trentin and Manuela Repetto (Eds.), Using Network and Mobile Technology to Bridge Formal and Informal Learning. Chandos. http://tinyurl.com/ovpe6jy
    • 10. Cultural resources for learning draws on various traditions for its interpretation Philosophical traditions of Idealism that take account of cultural resources Cultural resources in the sense of the Idealism (Humboldt) or its materialist version (Leont'ev) developed their education function by being appropriated. Social capital (various) & cultural capital (Bourdieu) Social class differences in the relevance of language to socialisation (Bernstein & Henderson, 1973; Bernstein, 1987).
    • 11. Appropriation has three dynamic components: firstly, bringing cultural resources into a person‟s inner horizon of preferences, values, arguments or feeling etc., secondly, processing e.g. the images of the internet and, thirdly, bringing out the results by expressions within the context of the school, FE. HE or workplace.
    • 12. Principle 2: Mobile phones are new cultural resources that operate within an individualised, mobile and convergent mass communication system Pachler, N., Bachmair, B. and Cook, J. (2010). Mobile Learning: Structures, Agency, Practices. New York: Springer.
    • 13. Google Scholar Cited by 91 – as of 05/09/12
    • 14. 5. There is a significant potential for the use of social media and mobile devices in informal, professional, work-based learning. FP7 IP Learning Layers (£10.5 million) Top ranked on 14.5 out of 15 Scaling up Lifelong Learning using TEL (Technology Enhanced Learning) in large clusters of Small to Medium Enterprises in the Health Professions and building industry „Networked Scaffolding – Interacting with People‟ £0.5 million for UWE, others with own budget
    • 15. Online People Tagging: Social (Mobile) Network(ing) Services and Work-based Learning, Cook & Pachler, BJET, 2012, http://tinyurl.com/o45j5pm
    • 16. 6. Social media and mobile devices can be used to design transformative, augmented contexts for learning Mobile Phones as Mediating Tools Within Augmented Contexts for Development, Cook, 2010, IJMBL http://tinyurl.com/oc2wre9
    • 17. Urban planning Carl Smith
    • 18. “The information given was underlined by the 'experience' of the area and therefore given context in both past and present.”
    • 19. Landscape architecture at Cistercian abbey (Fountains Yorkshire, North England) Carl Smith
    • 20. Task
    • 21. “The ability to be in a particular position but get a variety of views/different visual perspective was a very useful opportunity. The whole thing also got everyone talking in a way I hadn't experienced on field trips to Fountains before.”
    • 22. 22 Realistic scenarios various experiments in diverse subject matters and educational levels Patricia Santos Barca Barca Discovering Barcelona! Bachelor students explored the city observing and interacting with the architecture and the street furniture with the aim of putting in practice urbanism and history skills. Assessing Botany in situ The professor created a route where the university students had to answer questions in situ observing the Barcelona botany garden, and finding, touching and measuring specific plants. A literature adventure A group of senior learners (~70 years old), members of a literature group, created two routes with the aim of proposing questions about facts of a literature novel set in a district of Barcelona.