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Ebook Availability Revisited    A quantitative analysis of the 2012        ebook aggregator marketplace           John McD...
slideshare.net: Charleston price and mcdonald 2008
Today’s Outline1) availability of print book content in the eBook   aggregator marketplace: 2008 v 20122) eBook Aggregator...
2008 StudyResearch Question (from a campus administrator):“If you were to stop buying print books today (i.e. in2008), wha...
2006/7 pBook purchases available as eBooks by Vendor           5%      13%   13%        10%           23%         26%     ...
2008 ≈ 30% pBook purchases available as     eBooks from major aggregators                                 100%2006-2007 pr...
2012 “repeat” of this study DatasetsPRINT BOOKS                   ELECTRONIC BOOKS• 2006 and 2011 pub date      • Aggregat...
Audience Poll   What proportion of 2011 pub date   purchases are available as ebooks? (vs   2008 availability)       a) Fe...
pBook purchases available as eBooks by Vendor     Ebrary                 MyI-         At leastYear          EBL   Ebrary  ...
YBP Select category comparison                             Zero2006 & 2011 Print Books   aggregators   At least oneBasic-E...
Part 2: Switching Gears…  to a Quantitative analysis  of the ebook aggregator  marketplace
Audience poll How much has the size of the ebook aggregator marketplace increased in the past four years? a)   10% b)   25...
Total Ebooks w/ unique eISBNs                         -17%      16%                  +22%            46%                  ...
2008 vs 2012Ebook Aggregator marketplace overlap
Depth: # of Books available by year
Depth:# of Books available by year       # of Books available by year
Aggregator Subscription EbookCollections Analytical Faceoff
State University of New York Press   3304   Wiley                                      2194                               ...
University of Chicago Press         1273  1EbraryAC                         1273University of Minnesota Press       1252  ...
Subscribed Collections Summary• 33% Ebrary : 27% in Common : 40% EBSCO• Ebsco’s advantage comes from older ebooks • 1980-1...
Subscription cost less than a penny on          the dollar per year!Subscribable Ebrary Ebooks = 77,482 purchase price $5,...
University Press collections
Part 3: Hathi Trust & Google booksPutting the Ebook AggregatorMarketplace into stark perspective
Hathi Bythe decade             1960-69             n = 624,845             1970-79             n = 722,697                ...
EbookMarketplaceis only 1/3 as   large as  Hathi for   2000-09    books
Google books casts an even longer shadow
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
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Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace

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Slides from our 2012 Charleston Conference presentation on eBook availability from the four major aggregator services.

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  • This presentation repeats a study we presented at the 2008 Charleston Conference.Available: http://www.slideshare.net/john_mcdonald/charleston2008-ebook3
  • UPCC = University Press Content ConsortiumUPSO = University Press Scholarship Online
  • Details on the 2008 study.
  • The 2012 study used different methods to ask the same question.Four of the five libraries from the first study were includedWe started with the OCLC xISBN & WorkIDcrosswalks from the startWe used ebook knowledgebase data instead of vendor source files**One aggregator expressed concern that the KB based numbers looked quite low—We are validating our results by acquiring all of the source files direct from the aggregators to determine whether the 2012 marketplace (and match rate) is significantly underrepresented by the knowledgebase data.
  • C was correct; More 35-50%Using our updated protocol, 24% of 2006 (2008’s study) pub year print books were available electronically, while37% of 2011 (2012’s study) pub year print purchases were available Not status quo, but not a quantum leap either!The increase from 24 to 37% does represent more than a 50% increase…*(subject to validation using ebook aggregator source files)
  • We were interested in the perceived ‘quality’ of the available ebooks (some have speculated that ebook vendors are publishing lots of books but of lower quality).Availability does appear to vary by YBP select rating- E book versions were more likely to be available for research and specialized books than for Basic or Supplementary. There were no obvious differences between the two year samples in this comparison (data not shown). We speculated that a large portion of the books in the two Basic categories are University Press publications that are less likely to be in aggregator lists.
  • D – 100% was the correct answer (see next slide)Follow-up work based on aggregator-direct lists may show it to be even greater
  • 2008 inGreenvs 2012 in brown Percentages are portion of the total marketplace in that year (for green bars the proportion of the tallest green bar, and likewise with brown)Greatest market share increase was 22% ebrary, while Ebsco/Net Library decreased by 17%,perhaps not surprisingly given that their 77% share of the market in 2008 was based on their unique collection of older books rather than on that great a difference in acquisition of the current year’s monographic output. Average market share has increased slightly from 47 to 52%, but the range has dropped by 2/3rds (ie from 46 to 16%) If you were making a decision in the past on an aggregator based on the relative size of their collections, those differences are decreasing over time.So if each aggregator covers 50 % of the marketplace, it follows that two should cover most books, right?...
  • Unfortunately, that’s not the case--nearly 50% of aggregator-hosted ebooks are still offered by only ONE vendorAvailability across aggregators has increased significantly however: in 2008 only 1 in 25 books were available from all 4 whereas in 2012, 1 in 5 is available from all four
  • The vast majority of ebooks in aggregated products are those published in the past 15 years.with Ebsco/Net library showing clear dominance in terms of # of books offered each year for 1990-2004. The past 8 years (2005-2012) are worth looking at it more detail.
  • In 2008, MyILibrary (in blue) moved from the middle to the bottom in terms of coverage of the most recent years’ books, Starting in 2010, Ebrary (in green) outranked its competitors, and Ebsco has fallen in line with EBL over the past two years.
  • In 2011 Ebsco launched its own large academic subscription optionThe first competitor for ebrary’s Academic Complete subscription collection
  • From Aggregator provided source filesEbraryAC = Ebrary Academic CompleteEbscoES = Ebsco Ebook Subscription collection
  • Publication dates of subscribed collections mirror the full collectionsEbsco has many more books from the 80s & 90sWhen we take a closer look at the most recent decade…
  • Ebrary has a small percentage more from the first half of the decadeAnd things seem to be evening out for the most recent five yearsThere appear to be signs of a bit more differentiation for 2010 and 11 as the number of books in common is a lower proportion of the wholeAnd as expected there is about a year and a half lag before ebooks are added to these collections
  • The key point here is that there are a number of cases where particular publisher imprints are only listed for one aggregatorThough one might expect that this is the result of “exclusive” subscription deals, it is more likely caused by the newness of the Ebsco subscribed collection AND in some cases different publisher naming conventionsFor example ebrary does have books from Elsevier Science but uses the many subdivisions rather than grouping themThis same data is presented on the following two slides with a focus more on the publishers and less on the pattern
  • Keeping that caveat in mind, the blue and green bars here show cases were a publisher is listed in only one of the two collectionsAnd bar charts show the relative numbers for the publishers that appear in both collections
  • Keeping that caveat in mind, the blue and green bars here show cases were a publisher is listed in only one of the two collectionsAnd bar charts show the relative numbers for the publishers that appear in both collections
  • Based on LC class distribution to examine subject coverageOverall the distribution is quite similarEbraryACmay lean slightly toward science (see Medicine, Science and Technology) while EbscoES has more books in the humanities & social sciences
  • The data presented on this slide argue STRONGLY for subscribing to BOTH collections, given the differentiation presented in the previous slidesInstead of a 10 or 20 year period of subscription matching the purchase price, it would take 300(!) years of subscription costs to own the same contentFurthermore and perhaps equally important(!) books in the subscribed collections have unlimited simultaneous use, while purchased books from these two vendors are limited to a single simultaneous user (unless a premium is paid for each book)
  • 70-85% of the ebooks available in these University press collections are available from the major aggregators (albeit with more restrictive DRM)
  • But of course they represent only a tiny portion of what is available in the overall marketplaceJSTOR offerings are just becoming available as we speak
  • Each color slice shows the proportion of collection by decade or century*from hathitrust.org website [http://www.hathitrust.org/visualizations_dates]
  • Caveat– this only reflects relative size -- its not book to book matching as in prior comparisons…that’s a next step
  • Not a fan of 3d graphs, except in this case where the EBAM is effectively carpet on the floor that wouldn’t be visible if you looked at it end on.Although some currently question the value of our owned print collections, potential future subscription models from Hathi or Google (should copyright and royalty issues prove to be solvable) would definitely call into question the value of ownership of aggregator hosted ebooks that are subsumed within them
  • Transcript of "Ebook Availability Revisited: A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace"

    1. 1. Ebook Availability Revisited A quantitative analysis of the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace John McDonald & Jason Price, PhD CIO & AVP Interim Library Director Claremont Colleges Library
    2. 2. slideshare.net: Charleston price and mcdonald 2008
    3. 3. Today’s Outline1) availability of print book content in the eBook aggregator marketplace: 2008 v 20122) eBook Aggregator market share, depth & breadth 1) Full Collections (EBL, Ebrary, EBSCO, MyILibrary) 2) Subscribed collections (Ebrary & EBSCO) 3) Publisher coverage 4) University Press collections (UPCC & UPSO)3) Hathi Trust (& Google Books) - for perspective
    4. 4. 2008 StudyResearch Question (from a campus administrator):“If you were to stop buying print books today (i.e. in2008), what proportion of your purchases could bereplaced with ebooks?”Print book purchases (Cat date 2006-2007) • Data from 5 Libraries • 78,000 books total • Publication year ranged from 1912 – 2007, 82% were from 2005-07Ebook Marketplace Data from 4 eBook vendors • EBL, Ebrary, MyILibrary & NetLibrary source files • 220,000 books total • Publication year ranged from 1901 – 2009, 24% were from 2005-07
    5. 5. 2006/7 pBook purchases available as eBooks by Vendor 5% 13% 13% 10% 23% 26% EbraryLibrary EBL Ebrary MyILibrary NetLibrary At least one Sub C 4.9% 11.9% 13.7% 11.4% 23.3% 27.2% A 5.4% 10.3% 10.3% 10.8% 18.3% 21.3% D 4.7% 15.4% 15.4% 11.8% 25.0% 29.4% L 4.7% 14.6% 14.2% 9.7% 23.2% 27.3% S 7.1% 13.9% 13.5% 8.0% 23.0% 26.9%
    6. 6. 2008 ≈ 30% pBook purchases available as eBooks from major aggregators 100%2006-2007 print book purchases avalable as ebooks in 2008 80% 60% 40% 30.5% 32.2% 31.2% 31.7% 24.5% 20% 0% C A D L S Library
    7. 7. 2012 “repeat” of this study DatasetsPRINT BOOKS ELECTRONIC BOOKS• 2006 and 2011 pub date • Aggregator Marketplace from• Data from 4 libraries, ebook KnowledgeBase* combined w/ISBNs• 34,000 books total • 21,000 from 2006 • ISBNs run against xISBN API to • 13,000 from 2011 get OCLCnum & then against• Unique IDs xOCLCnum API to get Work ID • OCLC number & WorkID • Numbers to be announced… (instead of ISBN matching) Thanks to Sam Kome for untold hours of data wrangling
    8. 8. Audience Poll What proportion of 2011 pub date purchases are available as ebooks? (vs 2008 availability) a) Fewer (<20%) b) About the same (20-35%) c) More (35% - 50%) d) Way more ( > 50%)
    9. 9. pBook purchases available as eBooks by Vendor Ebrary MyI- At leastYear EBL Ebrary EBSCO Sub Library one2008 7% 15% 19% 17% 20% 24%2012 6% 26% 33% 25% 28% 37%So… 37% of 2011 Pub date purchases were available in the 2012 ebook aggregator marketplace
    10. 10. YBP Select category comparison Zero2006 & 2011 Print Books aggregators At least oneBasic-Essential 75% 25%Basic-Recommended 77% 23%Research-Essential 60% 40%Research-Recommended 61% 39%Specialized 61% 39%Supplementary 75% 25%
    11. 11. Part 2: Switching Gears… to a Quantitative analysis of the ebook aggregator marketplace
    12. 12. Audience poll How much has the size of the ebook aggregator marketplace increased in the past four years? a) 10% b) 25% c) 50% d) 100%
    13. 13. Total Ebooks w/ unique eISBNs -17% 16% +22% 46% +13%
    14. 14. 2008 vs 2012Ebook Aggregator marketplace overlap
    15. 15. Depth: # of Books available by year
    16. 16. Depth:# of Books available by year # of Books available by year
    17. 17. Aggregator Subscription EbookCollections Analytical Faceoff
    18. 18. State University of New York Press 3304 Wiley 2194 1EbraryAC 1495 1EbraryAC 60 2Common 699 2Common 135 MIT Press 2186 3EbscoES 3109 1EbraryAC 130National Academies Press 3301 2Common 638 1EbraryAC 3301 3EbscoES 1418ABC-CLIO 2903 University of California Press 2039 3EbscoES 2903 1EbraryAC 211Routledge 2837 2Common 769 1EbraryAC 954 3EbscoES 1059 2Common 1883 Ashgate Publishing Group 1716Cambridge University Press 2698 1EbraryAC 30 1EbraryAC 464 2Common 1686 2Common 1379 Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd / Books 1565 3EbscoES 855 3EbscoES 1565Brill Academic Publishers 2642 Palgrave Macmillan 1486 1EbraryAC 17 1EbraryAC 1486 2Common 1847 Continuum International Publishing 1437 3EbscoES 778 1EbraryAC 469 2Common 968ABC-Clio - Greenwood Publishing 2450 John Benjamins Publishing Co. 1368 3EbscoES 2450 3EbscoES 1368Oxford University Press 2395 World Bank Publications 1295 1EbraryAC 2395 1EbraryAC 1295Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2329 Sage Publications, Ltd. 1275 3EbscoES 2329 3EbscoES 1275
    19. 19. University of Chicago Press 1273 1EbraryAC 1273University of Minnesota Press 1252 1EbraryAC 1252Emerald Group Publishing Ltd 1180 1EbraryAC 1058 2Common 122John Benjamins Publishing Company 1090 1EbraryAC 3 2Common 1087Elsevier Science 1060 3EbscoES 1060Indiana University Press 1038 1EbraryAC 120 2Common 464 3EbscoES 454Kluwer Academic Publishers 1030 1EbraryAC 1030Greenwood Press 1024 1EbraryAC 276 2Common 748Jessica Kingsley Publishers 1014 1EbraryAC 83 2Common 796 3EbscoES 135
    20. 20. Subscribed Collections Summary• 33% Ebrary : 27% in Common : 40% EBSCO• Ebsco’s advantage comes from older ebooks • 1980-1999• Many publishers subscription ebooks are only available through one aggregator • Ebsco – ABC Clio, Nova Science, J. Benjamin, SAGE, etc. • Ebrary – Nat. Acad., Oxford, Palgrave, World Bank, etc.• Subject coverage is relatively similar
    21. 21. Subscription cost less than a penny on the dollar per year!Subscribable Ebrary Ebooks = 77,482 purchase price $5,670,776 (single-user price)≤ $3.75/FTE… so for 5000 fte = $18750/year% of list price per year = 0.33% (multi-user price)Years to buy = 300+ years! Ebsco subscription pricing is similar…Q.E.D. If you are investing in aggregator ebooks,you should seriously consider both subscriptionpackages, and avoid buying individual books thatare (or will be!) available by subscription…
    22. 22. University Press collections
    23. 23. Part 3: Hathi Trust & Google booksPutting the Ebook AggregatorMarketplace into stark perspective
    24. 24. Hathi Bythe decade 1960-69 n = 624,845 1970-79 n = 722,697 1990-99 1980-89 n = 785,758 n = 823,151
    25. 25. EbookMarketplaceis only 1/3 as large as Hathi for 2000-09 books
    26. 26. Google books casts an even longer shadow
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