MISSION-BASED GAMES                                           Debbie Carlton                                           Apr...
SUDDENLY, ABODYBUILDERAPPEARS AT ACONVENTION…          © 2013 CityMystery
OVER HIS HEART IS A TATOO          © 2013 CityMystery
© 2012 CityMystery.info
© 2013 CityMystery
© 2013 CityMystery
OUR GAMES BLEND                 Print                                         Web                                         ...
WE DESIGN MISSIONSTO GET PLAYERS INTOTHE REAL WORLD.                               AUDIO                                RE...
HOW MISSIONS WORK It’s all about engagement, sharing what you do and keeping the game                            moving fo...
THE SMITHSONIAN EXAMPLEGhosts of a Chance combined live and virtual events for families and groups of friends      [ages 1...
COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG EXAMPLE                      A game strategy that engages 8-12 year olds                  (digital n...
MULTI-BRAND EXAMPLE             Blend brands and institutions in a single game      Pheon used missions designed to showca...
A STRATEGY FOR EDU-GAMES       “The Disco Ceiling” is a game strategy to teach 11th graders about            the physics o...
THERE ARE ANYNUMBER OF THINGSMISSION-BASEDGAMES CAN DO FORLEARNING.           © 2013 CityMystery
HERE ARE TEN OF THEM1. Missions ask students to interact in the real   world as well as the virtual.2. Combines education ...
MISSIONS   AREDELIVEREDON PHONES TABLETS   AND LAPTOPS            © 2013 CityMystery
FACILITATORS                      MONITOR                   PROGRESS                    IN PERSON                 OR VIRTU...
HOW IT WORKS: COMPANIES LICENSE       PACKETS OF MISSIONS                                                                L...
APPENDIXSPONSORSHIP  © 2013 CityMystery
SPONSORED MISSIONSThe Proposition:          Score an additional 500            …and an additional 1000 points if you buy i...
MORE SPONSORED MISSIONS                    …companies, institutions, brands sponsor                     missions that refl...
webex invites you to form a network of players inLos Angeles, Minneapolis and Baltimore to bake a               cake from ...
WHO IS CITYMYSTERY?           A webby-lauded San Francisco mission-based game company               offering strategy, dev...
THANK YOU          John Maccabee415-377-6839, john@citymystery.info.           © 2013 CityMystery
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Debbie carlton 04_18_13 copy

167 views

Published on

Published in: Entertainment & Humor
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
167
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Six years ago the games I designed were called ARGs, then the name morphed to transmedia, which seemed more palatable than the esoteric-sounding Alternate Reality Games. But now what I design exists somewhere in and among ARGs, transmedia and mission-based games. There are narrative games with beginnings, middles and ends, and live components, which make the games inherently theatrical. And there are edu games which are designed for curricula and training. Let’s begin with narrative games to show you how storytelling works.
  • In gamespeak, this is called a rabbit hole, one of several ways into the narrative. Players surged forward, snapping pictures, a Flickr stream appeared and a blog, and these images lead to …
  • Called a Lover’s Eye. Players surged forward, snapping pictures, a Flickr stream appeared, and these images lead to …
  • An iconic image from the Smithsonian’s collection. It took players several hours to arrive at this page. And this particular rabbit hole leads you directly to the crux of the plot. The Smithsonian has become haunted. In the haunting, the ghosts have Inverted the text, and clicking on it leads you to the first game site.
  • And our first request for players to actually make something for the game – our players leave an incantation [we capture their cell numbers], and they post their own lovers’ eyes [we capture their email addresses]. At this point the audience can’t really be called the audience. They have become participants.
  • Hundreds of them, and eventually thousands. They work for the game. And that is what propels the narrative forward, and every time the players make something for the game, more of the ghosts’ stories is revealed. The object of the game is to reveal these stories, to honor them in some way, and to free them from having to haunt, and to free the museum from being haunted. We designers can have a dialogue with them. In-game characters can call specific players and one of the rules of the game is that whatever interaction a player has with the game has to be shared with other players.
  • So, what we have designed is a story that blends media, and in that way it is like a Google search, the player stitches the game and the narrative together.
  • And the basic building blocks of these games are missions. Missions that take you into the real world. Missions that must be completed by having you upload evidence of your completion into the game.
  • This game lasted six weeks. We used lots of mediums – Flickr, snail mail, blogs, cell phones, live events.
  • This game was designed to play for one and a half hours. Mixing generations – families and friends.
  • Pheon is a game built around a graphic novel that depicts a war raging in a mythical world that exists at the heart of our world. It has missions and submission. Pheon is also a proof of concept. Like the early days of TV, most games are single-sponsored. Pheon broke that mold. We have at least five sponsors. But instead of the story being sponsored, mission-based games suggest that the missions themselves, what participants actually do for the game, is sponsorable. By sponsoring missions, a brand tells its own story while providing the point of engagement for the player.
  • Training games.
  • .
  • Interestingly enough, with all this new media landscape, the business model is as old as radio and TV. Sponsorship. Sample mission: Get yourself invited to someone’s house for dinner, then sing for your supper, having your host videotape your performance as proof of completion. Who are likely sponsors? How about something you would bring your hosts to thank them? A bottle of wine? A six-pack of beer? A box of candy?
  • Missions tie the brand message with an action. Narrate your way to work as if you are a sportscaster. Advance in the game if you use any sports for Dummies product, and the game itself offers a point of sale.
  • Test products, test markets, test stories.
  • Debbie carlton 04_18_13 copy

    1. 1. MISSION-BASED GAMES Debbie Carlton April 24, 2013 © 2013 CityMystery
    2. 2. SUDDENLY, ABODYBUILDERAPPEARS AT ACONVENTION… © 2013 CityMystery
    3. 3. OVER HIS HEART IS A TATOO © 2013 CityMystery
    4. 4. © 2012 CityMystery.info
    5. 5. © 2013 CityMystery
    6. 6. © 2013 CityMystery
    7. 7. OUR GAMES BLEND Print Web Chat PuzzlesAN ARRAY OF MEDIA What- ever Voice- mail PhotosTHAT PERMEATES Face Book You Can MobilePLAYERS’ LIVES IN A Live Web Think Events Sites up You Web Blogs Tube Casts © 2013 CityMystery
    8. 8. WE DESIGN MISSIONSTO GET PLAYERS INTOTHE REAL WORLD. AUDIO REAL TEXT VIDEO WORLD THIS PLAYER COMPLETED A PHOTOS MISSION WHILE ON VACATION. © 2013 CityMystery
    9. 9. HOW MISSIONS WORK It’s all about engagement, sharing what you do and keeping the game moving forward.ExampleTo progress in this game you must digitally insert yourself into this artwork. © 2013 CityMystery
    10. 10. THE SMITHSONIAN EXAMPLEGhosts of a Chance combined live and virtual events for families and groups of friends [ages 12 – 55]. Players completed missions that moved the game along. Snail mail One player dated 1855 is made The sent to Fortune A near naked man attends a participants to Cookie as convention with a tattoo on his engage and Predictor of chest and is posted to Flickr move along Imminent the story Doom . Players worked alone using mobile apps Players attended CSI-like event, and online a post mortem of the remains of in teams an in-game character © 2013 CityMystery
    11. 11. COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG EXAMPLE A game strategy that engages 8-12 year olds (digital natives) and their parents (digital immigrants).* Players invited to Players collect save the cause of secret American Liberty by clues, decipher protecting a crucial codes, and learn the patriot on the eve of tricks of the spy the Battle of trade. Yorktown. Live events Players textwith historical answers to characters clues and doubling as stay in in-game touch to characters. receive updates. CLICK IMAGE TO PLAY VIDEO * Spring break, 2012 [4 days]: 6,000 Players generated 50,000 texts. © 2013 CityMystery
    12. 12. MULTI-BRAND EXAMPLE Blend brands and institutions in a single game Pheon used missions designed to showcase brand messages – all wrapped in a story about two warring tribes battling for control of a mythical universe. Players take quiz on Facebook Page to New story elements Game launched with a live determine which team launch over time. event at the Smithsonian. they belong to. Players Performance progress in depends onthe game as how other they solve players rate missions. their submissions. © 2013 CityMystery
    13. 13. A STRATEGY FOR EDU-GAMES “The Disco Ceiling” is a game strategy to teach 11th graders about the physics of sound and light waves while offering them opportunities to hone music and performance skills. Then told that buses11th graders are transportingbroken into teams Teams perform their own sound and lightand told they are music live to an audience, and equipment hasgoing to compete Teams issue challenges to other overturned.at an International assemble to schools to do the same. EverythingMusic Festival. build amp destroyed! systems and light show. Each medium contributes © 2013 CityMystery something to the experience.
    14. 14. THERE ARE ANYNUMBER OF THINGSMISSION-BASEDGAMES CAN DO FORLEARNING. © 2013 CityMystery
    15. 15. HERE ARE TEN OF THEM1. Missions ask students to interact in the real world as well as the virtual.2. Combines education & self-directed learning.3. Blends education with new media.4. Creates fresh context for learning.5. It’s completely interactive.6. It speaks to kids in their vernacular.7. Offers them the ability to share what they create with others online [i.e. minecraft].8. Makes a lasting impact through fun.9. Generates excitement around learning.10. Flexible enough for many learning situations. © 2013 CityMystery
    16. 16. MISSIONS AREDELIVEREDON PHONES TABLETS AND LAPTOPS © 2013 CityMystery
    17. 17. FACILITATORS MONITOR PROGRESS IN PERSON OR VIRTUALLY© 2013 CityMystery
    18. 18. HOW IT WORKS: COMPANIES LICENSE PACKETS OF MISSIONS Leadership Sales Communication Onboarding They are distributed to yourWe have customizable License them in participants and facilitators viamission templates that packets of 3, 5 and 8 smartphones, laptops &incorporate your best tablets.practices. missions designed around specific skill sets. Think of missions as workbooks or textbooks. © 2013 CityMystery
    19. 19. APPENDIXSPONSORSHIP © 2013 CityMystery
    20. 20. SPONSORED MISSIONSThe Proposition: Score an additional 500 …and an additional 1000 points if you buy itGet yourself invited to points if you bring a bottle from Wine.comsomeone’s house for of Moet…dinner. Sing for yoursupper. Have your hosttape your performance.This mission is worth250 points. © 2013 CityMystery
    21. 21. MORE SPONSORED MISSIONS …companies, institutions, brands sponsor missions that reflect their core values The Proposition: Narrate your route to work as if you are a professional sportscaster calling football plays and earn 2500 points Score an additional 500 points if you use any “Football for Dummies” Book. More points for buying it on this page. © 2013 CityMystery
    22. 22. webex invites you to form a network of players inLos Angeles, Minneapolis and Baltimore to bake a cake from scratch. © 2013 CityMystery
    23. 23. WHO IS CITYMYSTERY? A webby-lauded San Francisco mission-based game company offering strategy, development and implementation.The Team Advisors •• Founder John Maccabee has designed Dr. Anita McGahan, Economist, University of Toronto games for the Smithsonian, Colonial • Michael Edson, Dir. Of New Media Strategy, Smithsonian Williamsburg, and George Washington Institution • Kirk Read, Chairman of University, and has written and/or Humanities, Bates College produced for Sony, Warner Bros, NBC & • Robert Lenz, Co-Founder, CEO Envision Charter Schools CBS. • Jeneatte Boudreau, Esq. • Owens, Wickersham and• Our teams include Sean Mahan, Ian Kizu- Erikson, P.C. Blair, and Sam Lavigne, founders of the longest-running mission-based game in history, and Design Director Josh Levy. © 2013 CityMystery
    24. 24. THANK YOU John Maccabee415-377-6839, john@citymystery.info. © 2013 CityMystery

    ×