"Bridging the Ingenuity Gap in the 21st Century" (Creativity, Connectivity and the Mind’s Best Work) -- John Cimino, Creative Leaps International
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"Bridging the Ingenuity Gap in the 21st Century" (Creativity, Connectivity and the Mind’s Best Work) -- John Cimino, Creative Leaps International

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Scholar Thomas Homer Dixon describes the “ingenuity gap” – the space between problems that arise and our ability to solve them – as growing today at an alarming rate (in business, scientific ...

Scholar Thomas Homer Dixon describes the “ingenuity gap” – the space between problems that arise and our ability to solve them – as growing today at an alarming rate (in business, scientific research, education, the environment and world affairs). Author Ken Robinson proclaims we are “Out of Our Minds” to have sidelined creativity and the arts when every layer of American society from elementary education to supply-side economics is starved for more imagination, more original thinking, more creative intelligence. John Cimino, president of Creative Leaps International, looks at the habits of mind linked to creativity, ingenuity and imaginative insight and reviews recent findings in neuroscience revealing the brain’s unique experience of the arts and arts-based thinking. Right along side creativity, Cimino emphasizes the need for connectivity, that is, thinking across boundaries, disciplines and cultures to address the complex issues of a globally inter-connected world. Designing “high tech, high touch” environments for creativity and connectivity is the central challenge of our institutions of higher education, research and professional development. Cimino concludes with his vision for a network of Renaissance Centers for Innovation, Learning and Leadership.

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"Bridging the Ingenuity Gap in the 21st Century" (Creativity, Connectivity and the Mind’s Best Work) -- John Cimino, Creative Leaps International "Bridging the Ingenuity Gap in the 21st Century" (Creativity, Connectivity and the Mind’s Best Work) -- John Cimino, Creative Leaps International Presentation Transcript

  • DePaul Center, Creativity Forum Bridging the Ingenuity Gap in the 21 st Century Creativity, Connectivity and the Mind’s Best Work Creative Leaps International John J. Cimino, Jr. "Ancora imparo." ("I am still learning") Michelangelo at 87
    • The Ingenuity Gap:
    • the space between problems that arise and our ability to solve them
    The Ingenuity Gap Scholar Thomas Homer Dixon describes the “ingenuity gap” today as growing at an alarming rate (in business, industry, education, the environment and world affairs).
  • The Ingenuity Gap A problem for the world and our inner world
    • Wanted: leaders and other professionals who can
      • See clearly what is
      • Imagine what can be
      • Act to bring something new into the world
    The Harvard Business Review and the Corporate Sector Speak: The Ingenuity Gap Close the Ingenuity Gap The Writing on the Wall Wall Street Speaks
    • The new MBA is a liberal arts degree.
    • Traditional business training is too narrow and lacking in creative problem-solving skills. We need leaders and managers who can think broadly, creatively and adaptively in environments of constant change, who know how to improvise and work through complex problems with imagination and self discipline.
    The Writing on the Wall Wall Street and the Arts The Harvard Business Review and the Corporate Sector Speak: The Ingenuity Gap
    • The liberal arts teach people to deal with ambiguity, emotion, complexity and interpretation. These are critical issues in business, particularly as you move higher in the organization. Northrop Frye writes, “The kind of problem that literature raises is not the kind that you ever ‘solve’”. This is exactly the kind of problem one regularly confronts as a manager. It’s also the mirror image of engineering or physics where students are only exposed to solvable problems.”
    • (The Liberal Arts and Business) David Creelman
    The Writing on the Wall Wall Street and the Arts The Harvard Business Review and the Corporate Sector Speak: The Ingenuity Gap
    • “ As ingenuity gaps widen the gulfs of wealth
    • and power among us, we need imagination,
    • metaphor and empathy more than ever, to
    • help us remember each other’s essential
    • humanity.”
    • Thomas Homer Dixon
    The Ingenuity Gap The Ingenuity Gap
  •  
  • Two roads diverged in a yellow wood… Option I: Scholarship and Contemporary Research Option II: Da Vinci’s Insights
  • John Cimino Creative Leaps International "All our knowledge has its origins in our perception.“ Leonardo Da Vinci “ Everything is connected to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci
  • It is not logic which guides discovery and artful creativity, but perception and imaginative insight . Receiving from the outside… Conjuring from the inside… Now, imagine learning as personal discovery. (Vico) John Cimino Creative Leaps International "All our knowledge has its origins in our perception.“ Leonardo Da Vinci a footnote from neuroscience
  • Imagination = perception ? In terms of neurological events, our memories and imaginings of experience produce much the same experience as direct experience itself. (experiments using P.E.T. scans) The more we learn about learning and the brain, the more we learn how powerful our own beliefs are in creating what we experience as reality. Now, what’s the upside of this equation? a footnote from neuroscience
  • Imagination = perception ? In terms of neurological events, our memories and imaginings of experience produce much the same experience as direct experience itself. (experiments using P.E.T. scans) The more we learn about learning and the brain, the more we learn how powerful our own beliefs are in creating what we experience as reality. Now, what’s the upside of this equation? Imagination as interior sight and senses. a function of the physical body. a footnote from neuroscience
  • Fantasia Italian, for “imaginative insight”, (according to Vico) a knowing equivalent to the uniquely intimate knowing of an inventor or creator, more immediate and personal than knowing mediated via the stratagems of logic. “ Imagination is more important than knowledge.” Einstein
  • "All our knowledge has its origins in our perception.“ Leonardo Da Vinci One purpose of art is to alter the quality of our attentiveness -- to enhance, refresh and sharpen our perceptions . It is not logic which guides discovery and artful creativity, but perception and imaginative insight . Receiving from the outside… Conjuring from the inside… Now, imagine learning as personal discovery. (Vico) John Cimino Creative Leaps International a footnote from neuroscience
    • What do you see?
    • What do you see?
    • What do you see?
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  • "All our knowledge has its origins in our perception.“ Leonardo Da Vinci One purpose of art is to alter the quality of our attentiveness -- to enhance, refresh and sharpen our perceptions . It is not logic which guides discovery and artful creativity, but perception and imaginative insight . Receiving from the outside… Conjuring from the inside… Now, imagine learning as personal discovery. (Vico) John Cimino Creative Leaps International The arts inhabit and thrive at this cusp of perception and meaning-making, flexing both in favor of creativity, discovery and learning. The arts live here!
  • Artists on Perception and Art
    • I paint things as I think of them, not as I see them.
    • Picasso
  • Artists on Perception and Art
    • I paint things as I think of them, not as I see them.
    • Picasso
    • Each thing we see hides something else we want to see.
    • Magritte
  • Artists on Perception and Art
    • I paint things as I think of them, not as I see them.
    • Picasso
    • Each thing we see hides something else we want to see.
    • Magritte
    • The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions that have been hidden by the answers.
    • James Baldwin
  • When art works, play’s the thing Creative Leaps International John J. Cimino, Jr.
  • The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. Plutarch
  • John Cimino Creative Leaps International “ Everything is connected to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci Transfer Double description, Lenses and Binocular Depth, Metaphor and Creative Juxtaposition The Medici Effect To think as Nature Thinks Steps to an Ecology of Mind Consilience Knowledge Integration
  • Metaphors as mini-lenses and instruments of double description
    • The power and paradox of metaphors
    Let's jump in a bit deeper... John Cimino Creative Leaps International a footnote from neuroscience
  • a footnote from neuroscience Metaphor is defined neurologically as a spreading activation of the brain during learning. (Imaginative action) Governing Metaphors
      • The logic of metaphor as the logic of induction
        • Induction: from multiple observations to general principle
      • Setting the inductive process in motion
        • “ You make two statements; what is true of both of them is the formal truth” (Bateson)
      • Creative juxtaposition
        • Metaphor as creative juxtaposition
        • Metaphor as “double description”
        • Optimizing
        • Metaphors and Connectivity
    John J. Cimino, Jr. Creative Leaps International Metaphors: a spreading activation of the brain during learning Metaphors as mini-lenses and instruments of double description
  • Discovery and innovation in today’s world are more likely to be found at the crossroads of our disciplines than at their established centers, more likely to be revealed at the collision points of our cultures than in their mainstreams. “Only connect”, said Bateson. “This is how we make meaning, this is how we learn to think as Nature thinks.” A working philosophy of interdisciplinary connections and knowledge integration The Medici Effect
  • John Cimino Creative Leaps International “ Everything is connected to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci Corson’s Inlet Transfer Double description, Lenses and Binocular Depth, Metaphor and Creative Juxtaposition The Medici Effect To think as Nature Thinks Corson’s Inlet Steps to an Ecology of Mind Consilience Knowledge Integration
  • Creative Leaps International John J. Cimino, Jr. “ I went for a walk over the dunes again this morning to the sea…” A.R. Ammons Thinking about thinking at Corson's Inlet Thinking and learning with other logics Corson’s Inlet Let’s take a walk…
  • … I see narrow orders, limited tightness, but will not run to that easy victory: still around the looser, wider forces work: I will try to fasten into order enlarging grasps of disorder, widening scope, but enjoying the freedom that Scope eludes my grasp, that there is no finality of vision, that I have perceived nothing completely, that tomorrow a new walk is a new walk. A.R. Ammons (1963) Thinking about thinking at Corson's Inlet
  • Consilience Literally, a “jumping together” of knowledge across disciplines, consilience is all about connections, revealing deeper, common groundworks of explanation. “ Everything is connected to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci
  • Two roads diverged in a yellow wood… Option I: Scholarship and Contemporary Research Option II: Da Vinci’s Insights
  • Mind Processes of the Arts What do YOU think they are? What are your everyday names for these habits of mind?
  • Mind Processes of the Arts
    • Qualitative relationships in the absence of rules
    • Acting flexibly with purpose to approach a goal
    • Learning to explore possibilities within a medium
    • Using imagination to see multiple perspectives
    • Learning to pay attention to nuance
    • Surrendering to processes rather than leading
    • Learning to use language figuratively
    • Creating emotionally what cannot be expressed literally
    • The qualitative features of the arts and the world
    • Eliot Eisner
    • Stamford University
  • Creative Competencies of Leadership
    • Noticing – slowing down, taking in more
    • Subtle representation – eye for detail & relationship
    • Fluid perspective - attuned to multiple points of view
    • Using R-mode – non-verbal, intuitive processing
    • Personalizing work – arts interests spill into work
    • Skeptical inquiry – preserving the questions
    • Serious play – learning and exploring without rules
    • Portraying paradoxes, conflicts, unknown – mystery
    • Facility with metaphor – generative thinking
    • Making shared meanings - engaging creative tensions
    • Center for Creative Leadership
  • Creative Competencies of Leadership
    • Noticing – slowing down, taking in more
    • Subtle representation – eye for detail & relationship
    • Fluid perspective - attuned to multiple points of view
    • Using R-mode – non-verbal, intuitive processing
    • Personalizing work – arts interests spill into work
    • Skeptical inquiry – preserving the questions
    • Serious play – learning and exploring without rules
    • Portraying paradoxes, conflicts, unknown – mystery
    • Facility with metaphor – generative thinking
    • Making shared meanings - engaging creative tension
    • Center for Creative Leadership
    • Qualitative relationships in the absence of rules
    • Acting flexibly with purpose to approach a goal
    • Learning to explore possibilities within a medium
    • Using imagination to see multiple perspectives
    • Learning to pay attention to nuance
    • Surrendering to processes rather than leading
    • Learning to use language figuratively
    • Creating emotionally what cannot be expressed literally
    • The qualitative features of the arts and the world
    • Eliot Eisner
    • Stamford University
    Mind Processes of the Arts
  • Creative Competencies of Leadership
    • Noticing – slowing down, taking in more
    • Subtle representation – eye for detail & relationship
    • Fluid perspective - attuned to multiple points of view
    • Using R-mode – non-verbal, intuitive processing
    • Personalizing work – arts interests spill into work
    • Skeptical inquiry – preserving the questions
    • Serious play – learning and exploring without rules
    • Portraying paradoxes, conflicts, unknown – mystery
    • Facility with metaphor – generative thinking
    • Making shared meanings - engaging creative tension
    • Center for Creative Leadership
    • Qualitative relationships in the absence of rules
    • Acting flexibly with purpose to approach a goal
    • Learning to explore possibilities within a medium
    • Using imagination to see multiple perspectives
    • Learning to pay attention to nuance
    • Surrendering to processes rather than leading
    • Learning to use language figuratively
    • Creating emotionally what cannot be expressed literally
    • The qualitative features of the arts and the world
    • Eliot Eisner
    • Stamford University
    Mind Processes of the Arts
  • Coeur The French word for “heart” from which we also derive the word “courage”. The heart: our body’s gateway to another order of knowing. “The heart has reasons, which reason does not comprehend.” “ It is only with the heart that one can see rightly. What is essential is invisible to the eye.” St. Exupery a footnote from neuroscience
  • a footnote from neuroscience Emotional markers and learning The amygdala, in effect, tags each experience we have with an emotional marker. The stronger the emotion attached to an experience, the stronger the marker, the more intense our memory of that experience. Engaging emotion in learning invariably increases the vividness and retention of particular learning experiences. (UCI)
  • What do you think? Emotions precede our application of logic, impelling particular directions of exploration over others and singling out certain associations among ideas or idea fragments over others. (intuitions, hunches, feelings) Emotions as integrators of experience and ideas: “ the feeling of what happens” (Antonio Damasio)
    • Emotions, Imagination and the Body
    • Not losing our minds, but coming to our senses
  • a footnote from neuroscience Neurogenesis and neural plasticity We are constantly growing new brain cells and do so all our lives. Only we can decide what our brains will become. (a story…) Good news…
  • John Cimino Creative Leaps International "All our knowledge has its origins in our perception.“ Leonardo Da Vinci “ Everything is connected to everything else.” Leonardo Da Vinci So, how do we infuse creativity and connectivity into our schools, universities, organizations, businesses and communities? What sort of entity could serve as a catalyst, enabler or model for our 21 st century institutions? The Big Question:
  • Governing Metaphors Visual Images What sort of entity could serve as a catalyst or model for our 21 st century institutions? Visual Explorer
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership We envision a new institution, a uniquely 21st century center for learning, discovery and innovation which will bring together the domains of education, business, the arts and sciences in a revolutionary new research and learning environment. Vision
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership The performing and creative arts will occupy center stage at this new institution, but not as destinations in themselves, rather as lightning rods for creative thinking across the disciplines and as new lenses for problem-solving, dialogue and research. Research and Learning Environment
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership The challenges facing leaders in education, business and the social sector are today exceedingly complex and unsuited to solutions generated from within the silos of individual disciplines. Nor will these challenges will be resolved by a business as usual reliance upon traditional methods of analysis and the usual linear models of causality. Challenges
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership More than ever before, there is a profound need for more imagination and ingenuity, for new conceptual frameworks and fresh approaches to the complexities of our world. Where will this come from? We must look bravely to a species of thinking and learning that flows from incendiary new perceptions and vivid new unifying insights. “ Knowledge is limited,” Einstein reminds us. “Imagination encircles the world.” Imagination
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership Discovery and innovation in today’s world are more likely to be found at the crossroads of our disciplines than at their established centers, more likely to be revealed at the collision points of our cultures than in their mainstreams. “Only connect”, said Bateson. “This is how we make meaning, this is how we learn to think as Nature thinks.” A working philosophy of interdisciplinary connections and knowledge integration
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership Arts Creative, Performing, Interpretive Connectivity Interdisciplinarity, Knowledge Integration Research Creativity, Arts, Learning, Culture, Neuroscience Technology Creative, Educational and Systems Support Education Teacher Formation, Renewal, Professional Development, Educational Leadership, K-12 Arts Integration (The Learning Arts) Business, Government, NGOs Leadership, Creativity, Innovation, Resilience & CRO Services (Creative Leaps International) Living Systems Science and Human Values Sustainable Technologies, Education, Public Interest Imaginative Universities and Business Schools Creativity, Leadership, Knowledge Integration, Entrepreneurship Teaching Artists and Consultants Training, Mentoring, Professional Development Harnessing the power and vitality of the arts to help organizations and their leaders access multiple creative connections, deeper personal insights and rich new solutions to the challenges at hand Serving five inter-connected constituencies
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership Why a “Renaissance” Center? Renaissance , from the French and Latin, meaning “re-birth” 1. Historically , the transitional movement in Europe between medieval and modern times beginning in the 14 th century in Italy, lasting into the 17 th century, and marked by a humanistic revival of classical influence expressed in a flowering of the arts and literature and by the beginnings of modern science 2. Universally, a movement or period of vigorous artistic and intellectual activity We seek a 21 century renaissance of the human spirit -- enlivened by creativity, impassioned by learning and guided by wise and compassionate leadership. We seek a more vibrant and mutually sustaining relationship with our planet Earth. We seek a vigorous interplay among the arts, sciences and entrepreneurial pioneers. We seek ideas across all boundaries, cultures and disciplines. We seek a peaceful, sustainable, equitable society. The Renaissance provoked inquiry, encouraged criticism, revealed a deeper, freer human nature, shattered narrow mental barriers and connected the disciplines of knowledge in a three century burst of creativity and invention. Achievements of the Renaissance : a new way of regarding the material world and human nature, a new conception of humankind’s destiny and duties on this planet, a new culture and new intellectual perceptions penetrating every sphere of thought and energy -- and on the world stage, new reciprocal relations among the nations.
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership
    • There is an emerging awareness among leaders, researchers and scholars that interdisciplinarity, knowledge integration, leadership and entrepreneurship:
    • are inextricably linked as 21 st century sensibilities,
    • constitute the new high ground in higher education, scientific research and economic development,
    • and may be achievable only through a vast systemic infusion of imagination, creativity and ingenuity.
    Collateral Insights
  • Renaissance Center for Innovation, Learning and Leadership Enter the mind processes and disciplines of the arts. Synthesis Facility with metaphor Recognizing patterns Solving problems in the absence of rules Using imagination to see multiple perspectives Learning to pay attention to nuance Finely crafting with attention to detail Comfort with ambiguity and paradox Integrating input from the periphery of awareness: “peripheral learning” Rigorous, disciplined preparation Acting flexibly with purpose to approach a goal Resisting closure: not connecting the dots too soon An iterative working style keyed to deadlines Engaging emotion as an integrator of learning Expressing figuratively what cannot be expressed literally Ensemble approaches to leadership and peak performance Working with multiple levels of meaning and alternate modes of expression Creating affirmative thinking environments where something different begins to feel possible
  • Faculty of Creative Leaps International Richard Albagli “ The Hero’s Journey” Donna Wissinger “ Top Form: Habits of Excellence” Paul Spencer Adkins “ Of Color and Courage” Jon Klibonoff “ Risk, Focus, Flow” Dianne Legro “ The Kinesthetics of Leadership” John Cimino “ Leadership: Thinking, Perceiving & Judgment”
  • WE ARE TRANSMITTERS
    • We are transmitters,
    • natural transmitters of mysterious transmissions.
    • Whatever it is that we as parents and professionals give
    • or transmit to our children and colleagues,
    • it is far more than our mastery of subject.
    • It is very much palpable essences of who we are
    • and our own impulses toward growth.
    • We are transmitters of life, or the absence of life.
    • Our choice is clear.
    John J. Cimino, Jr. Creative Leaps International 845-469-7254 [email_address]
  • Contact Information
    • John J. Cimino, Jr.
    • President & CEO
    • Creative Leaps International
    • 88 Hardscrabble Road
    • Chester, NY 10918
    • 845-469-7254
    • [email_address]
  • Metaphors of vision and explanation
    • Invent organizational metaphors for our universities, businesses and families
    • as they are and as they could be.
    As the are As they could be Universities Businesses Families (Governing metaphors)
  • Reviewed by Eric Booth in Teaching Artist Journal Volume 5, Number 1 (2007)
    • Persisting
    • Thinking and communicating with clarity and precision
    • Managing impulsivity
    • Gathering data through all senses
    • Listening with understanding and empathy
    • Creating, imagining , innovating
    • Thinking flexibly
    • Responding with wonderment and awe
    • Thinking about thinking (metacognition)
    • Taking responsible risks
    • Striving for accuracy
    • Finding humor
    • Questioning and posing problems
    • Thinking interdependently
    • Applying past knowledge to new situations
    • Remaining open to continuous learning
    We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. Aristotle Habits of Mind Developmental Series (Volume 1) Edited by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick