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Presentation for Social Marketing presentation on 10 September 2009

Presentation for Social Marketing presentation on 10 September 2009

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  • Before we get started, I’d like first to give you a quick introduction to the NSM Centre itself. The NSM Centre is a strategic partnership between the Government (Department of Health) and the National Consumer Council in England. The partnership was first established in 2005 to undertake an independent review of health-related campaigns and social marketing across Government This found strong evidence that social marketing can and does work, but that support was needed to build skills and capacity in the field across Britain. In the ‘Choosing Health’ Public Health White Paper, and in the NCC report ‘It’s our health!’ (June 2006) recommended founding a National Social Marketing Centre to address this need. The Centre was officially opened in December 2006, and has 6 core work programmes. Currently it’s main funding comes from the Department of Health. It therefore has a particular focus on working with people to improve the impact of health-related interventions. Part of this work involves developing commissioning expertise. Developing commissioning guide for DH – will be available – WHEN?
  • Moving away from an expert knows best model, where its only at the implementation stage that public wants and needs are considered to a public driven model
  • Where we start by listening to the public/consumer and what there needs and wants are – As Gordon Brown said when he took over as prime minister.
  • And we know why information giving has been the default option Pressure to be seen to be acting Desire to help Poorly developed skills and understanding in population behaviour Short term policy planning budegting, review and targets Why so much is spent above the line
  • Boring – not going to have another pint coz I’ve had my 5 units for the day Difficult – give up smoking Lonely – I’m the only one worried about turning off the lights in the office to save electricity
  • Put another way marketers offer short term benefits – enjoyment now – cake with your coffee every morning with longer term costs – eg obesity We offer opposite longer term benefits – may be healthier in 20 years time with short term costs – can’t have that cake with coffee How do we change that
  • So we turn longer term benefits into more immediate benefits and reduce the short term costs
  • Like commercial marketing, social marketing starts with the customer first. Do you just focus on the one problem area or do you focus on understanding theie life as a whole and how that problem area fits with the rest of their life It looks at the ‘customer in the round’ – focuses on understanding their lives as a whole and in all aspects, rather than JUST considering one particular ‘problem area’ Involves RESEARCH – focus groups, qualitative and quantitative data collection, stakeholder engagement. Not just collection of data for its own sake. Mass of information exists. Some in private sector Through a real knowledge of the customer, social marketing can then deliver interventions that respond to individuals’ actual needs, circumstances or ambitions.
  • The emphasis is on gaining insight into what moves and motivates the customer its not just about collecting data Aim = to identify key factors that influence a particular behaviour. = to understand WHY people behave in the way that they do (what they think, feel, believe) Need to understand data and then generate the insight
  • Advertisers use it! so should we. What moves people? Why do they act as they do? How can we use that insight to generate change? e.g. if children won’t take school meals because they aren’t ‘cool’ – what can we do to use that insight and make it into action? School food clubs, make food fun, cooking lessons, parents involved, food fun days… If men aren’t using stop smoking services because there’s a ‘women’s hour’ feel to them – what can we do? Dad’s clubs, men sessions, blokey campaigns… If people aren’t attending for breast screening because it’s inconvenient to get to the hospital – how can we overcome that? Screening services in supermarket carparks, easier appointment system etc etc. Understand what motivates people and use that understanding
  • i.e. identifying distinct sub-groups within the more general population. … the process of subdividing a market into distinct subsets of customers that behave in the same way or have similar needs. Ideally, each consumer should be treated differently and made a unique offering. This isn’t practical, so consumers are grouped according to similarity of needs/desires… Remember – hedonist exercise at start of presentation – crude example of segmentaion
  • Also have examples of segmentation – heard of – quick quiz to see if you know them
  • Almost need to think about segmentation before you start which sub groups will you be focussing on – Also need to be flexible might have to change focus if research dictates Eg Chlamydia demonstration site - focus on teenage girls screening but research showed GPs not offering service
  • Who is your competition? Never get a commercial company ignoring competition – can we We see so many messages everyday – health ones as well as commercial ones – how do we compete – particularly with commercial organisations – budgets, firepower we can’t – should we – can we work in partnership? Eg MTV breakfast club – Food Dudes and Aldis – in particular the research and customer understanding Internal competition – tyranny of small decisions – yes go to the gym – how many going to the gym after the conference? How may actually go as tired after today – work to do family to see! Also have to face fear of failure self- belief
  • Who’s the competition and what are they offering?? fun/pleasure/enjoyment/taste/ affordability/speed/convenience How can we compete with this? Make our interventions as fun and popular as possible… Spotting the competition? Often seen in simplistic terms: ‘the goodies’ ‘the baddies’ Internal competition – tyranny of small decisions – yes go to the gym – how many going to the gym after the conference? How may actually go as tired after today – work to do family to see! Also have to face fear of failure self- belief what are the factors influencing individual behaviour and how can we address them?
  • “ working with people to generate solutions to behaviour challenges” working to realise the potential of effective social marketing National Social Marketing Centre The NSM Centre is a strategic partnership, between the Government and the National Consumer Council in England. The partnership was first established in 2005 to undertake an independent review as a cross-Government commitment made in the ‘Choosing Health’ Public Health White Paper, and in June 2006 the ‘It’s our health!’ review report was published. The NSM Centre was formally launched by the cross-Government Minister for Public Health, Caroline Flint on 11 th December 2006 and works to develop and build capacity and skills in social marketing. Currently it’s main funding comes from the Department of Health. It therefore has a particular focus on working with people to improve the impact and effectiveness of health-related interventions, programmes and campaigns at the national and local levels, by integrating effective strategic and operational social marketing approaches. c/o National Consumer Council 20 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1W 0DH 0207 881 3045 [email_address] www.nsmcentre.org.uk www.ncc.org.uk
  • “ working with people to generate solutions to behaviour challenges” working to realise the potential of effective social marketing National Social Marketing Centre The NSM Centre is a strategic partnership, between the Government and the National Consumer Council in England. The partnership was first established in 2005 to undertake an independent review as a cross-Government commitment made in the ‘Choosing Health’ Public Health White Paper, and in June 2006 the ‘It’s our health!’ review report was published. The NSM Centre was formally launched by the cross-Government Minister for Public Health, Caroline Flint on 11 th December 2006 and works to develop and build capacity and skills in social marketing. Currently it’s main funding comes from the Department of Health. It therefore has a particular focus on working with people to improve the impact and effectiveness of health-related interventions, programmes and campaigns at the national and local levels, by integrating effective strategic and operational social marketing approaches. c/o National Consumer Council 20 Grosvenor Gardens, London, SW1W 0DH 0207 881 3045 [email_address] www.nsmcentre.org.uk www.ncc.org.uk
  • Often offering long term, delayed benefits, in exchange for immediate costs – effort, discomfort, change of habit/ routine, cost… Easy to see the exchange in a commercial sector – 40p for a Mars Bar – there’s the cost here is the benefit How do we make it clear easy, fun and popular How do we reduce the barriers and increase the incentives
  • Mammogram = fear of finding cancer, painful pressure, wait time, finding a parking place, going to the hospital, cold metal surfaces, having to wait a week for the results Increase benefits = Heat mental surfaces, reduce wait time, provide valet parking, etc. So, Consider the completion Can you decrease your costs relative to the completion? Can you increase monetary or nonmonetary benefits?
  • Mammogram = fear of finding cancer, painful pressure, wait time, finding a parking place, going to the hospital, cold metal surfaces, having to wait a week for the results Increase benefits = Heat mental surfaces, reduce wait time, provide valet parking, etc. So, Consider the completion Can you decrease your costs relative to the completion? Can you increase monetary or nonmonetary benefits?
  • The results of this type of integrated approach can be seen in the impact on smoking prevalence. - Since the late 1970s, smoking prevalence rates have fallen 16 percentage points; we are expecting to meet our PSA in 2010; and there are now more ex-smokers in England than smokers. We also know that iconic advertising – such as this example, funded by DH but delivered through the British Heart Foundation – has had a major impact – 50% of quits last year were prompted by advertising. So, why the need for a change of strategy?
  • The other thing we need to do was find out more about the lives of people in this group. So we conducted a large piece of observational research, in their homes and workplaces. Some of our key conclusions: Smoking fulfils every possible need from reward to stress relief Benefits of smoking outweigh negatives Smokers have negative image of non-smoker/ex-smoker Provides them with a sense of belonging within their social circle/community – in this context smoking is almost endorsed R&M smokers want to quit, but find it harder to quit successfully for many reasons (e.g. access to cheap tobacco, routine lives, no culture of quitting) Most have previously tried to ‘quit’. In fact, they are as likely to try to quit as the general population. Lack of support from partner/peers and emotional stress are major downfalls
  • So, to summarise what has changed in the new approach: A new target audiences A new set of insights A new focus on triggering action and making quitting easier A broader range of levers – including community activation rather than simply broadcast advertising And clear performance indicators derived from the lead generation model. And if that’s the science of marketing, the art is how do we bring this to life. In this case, it involves huge cigarettes with people on top, being rescued by cranes. The new campaign broke on Boxing Day and will run until the end of March. The early results show: Valid calls running at approximately twice target We have already achieved 75% of the three-month target And I will hand over to Peter.

Warsaw Warsaw Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to Social Marketing Warsaw 10 September 2009 John Bromley
  • Learning Objectives
    • An understanding of the basic concepts and tools of social marketing
    • Knowledge of how to use social marketing tools and commission social marketing projects
    • Description of some examples of good practice in the UK
  • Expert defined objectives and targets Strategies : programmes and plans Moving toward consumer orientation Implementation : adapt to consumer wants and needs Evaluate programme and plans Expert knows best model
  • Consumer wants and needs Policy objectives and targets Marketing strategy Evaluation Learning and refinement Insight driven model
  • Conspiracy of passive failure
    • We know that some programmes and campaigns are window dressing but we still do them.
    • Information giving is often the default option when issues are hard to deal with
    • Why:
      • Pressure to be seen to be acting
      • The desire to help
      • Poorly developed skills and
      • understanding in population behaviour
      • Change
      • Short term policy planning budgeting
      • and review
  • Difference of approach crafting ‘our messages’ communicating the messages Communications & message based approach accurate / relevant / clear creative / clever / funny / impactful / interesting / attention grabbing / etc Starts with the customer and what’s important to them Customer based social marketing approach understanding the customer directly informing intervention options (marketing mix) generating ‘insight’ what ‘moves & motivates’
  • Marketing works to make things: Fun Easy Popular &
  • often we offer: Boring worthy sensible healthy adult mature removing risks & excitement Difficult hard to do challenging impossible! extra effort less convenient time consuming lonely facing on my own feel a sissy everyone else enjoying themselves others think I’m judging them isolating uncool
  • Short term BENEFITS rewards Longer term COSTS consequences Marketers offer: Enjoyment now! Health problems in later years Longer term BENEFITS Short term COSTS What we offer: Reduce your pleasure from food Your health in 20 years time
  • We need to Longer term BENEFITS Turning into more immediate BENEFITS Short term COSTS Reducing Make our ‘product’ Fun Easy Popular &
  • Customer Orientation Developing a full understanding of your audience, based on good market and consumer research and combining data from different sources.
  • “ Customer intelligence is now a key factor in differentiating winners from the losers..” Business Week Best Performers 2007
  • Developing Insight Marketing is driven by ‘insights’ that are able to provide a guide for selecting and developing programmes.
  • Act on ‘insight’ – what really motivates people?
  • It’s not just about collecting lots of data…
  • … but developing ‘actionable insights’ Moving beyond the data • Important to move away from simply identifying and collecting a wide range of information, data and intelligence • Towards identifying potential ‘insights’ within the data and intelligence – and then testing these with the audience data pre-testing sharing & applying understanding insight sources of information & intelligence
  • WHAT? WHY? SO WHAT? Data Understanding Insight Source: Government Communications Network The journey… Facts & observations related to our insight task Explaining what’s going on The deep truth that strikes a chord with people
  • Segmentation Using segmentation to look at the audience and try to identify sub-groups (segments) that may have similar needs, attitudes or behaviours.
  • Segmentation Young Upwardly Mobile Professional People Double Income No Kids Destitute Unemployed Mature Professional Person Inheriting Parents Property Self Centred Urban Male Single Income Loads of Kids Single Income No Boyfriend Absolutely Desperate Single income Two Children Outrageous Mortgage Well-Off Older Person YUPPIES DINKE DUMP PIPPIE SCUM SILKY SINBAD SITCOM WOOPIE
  • The importance of segmenting Don’t smoke MESSAGE Smoking kills – stop smoking I won’t, I don’t want to die early So what? It’s the thrill of doing something dangerous that attracts! I know it’s dangerous and I’ll give up later
  • The importance of segmenting Tobacco Control Strategy Break down the audience into clusters with targeted marketing programmes for each group
  • Competition Understand what competes for the time and attention of the audience - internally (psychological) and externally
  • Competition Exercise more Stay in school Wear a seatbelt Don’t smoke … or drink Exercise Eat 5 a-day Don’t carry a knife Etc, etc, etc OR CB-S 2006
  • sex available time / boredom take drugs for fun / drink & get plastered eat crisps, burgers, convenience food computer games street cred / streetwise / sussed friends / social life music cars / motorbikes youth club something for nothing smoke speed / exhilaration convenience risk taking buy latest clothes peer approval adulthood / maturity c excitement my attention ? sugar / sweets internet mobile phones hair, nails, complexion families & children everyday life ! ‘ Competition’ cream cakes
  • ‘ Competition’ my attention ? safer sex HIV/Aids conserve energy avoid drugs & limit alcohol ‘ 5-a-day’ eat fresh fruit & veg exercise / physical activity report crime claim benefits report domestic violence ‘ Think!’ road safety vote tax returns don’t smoke don’t speed don’t drink drive cross road safely use public transport volunteer park & ride ‘ rat on a rat’ get child immunised sex available time / boredom take drugs for fun / drink & get plastered eat crisps, burgers, convenience food computer games street cred / streetwise / sussed friends / social life music cars / motorbikes youth club something for nothing smoke speed / exhilaration convenience risk taking buy latest clothes peer approval excitement sugar / sweets internet hair, nails, complexion my attention ? families & children use NRT reality check recycle save water reduce salt don’t litter cream cakes adulthood / maturity mobile phones fun / enjoyment pleasure happiness satisfaction
  • Exchange Understand what the person has to give (costs) in order to get the benefits proposed.
  • A balancing act costs benefits
  • Stopping Smoking costs benefits
    • Alienation from friends
    • I enjoy smoking
    • It helps my nerves
    • it’s part of my social life
    • I’m too busy
    • I tried and failed
    • Free/subsidised help
    • Friends can influence
    • Work encourages
    • Work incentives
  • Advertising has contributed to long-term decline in prevalence rates…
    • Reduction in adult smoking prevalence from 40% in 1978 to 24% in 2005
    • On track to meet the government target reduce smoking rates to 21% or less by 2010
    • There are now more ex-smokers than smokers in England
    • In 2006, over 50% of smokers say advertising prompted their most recent quit attempt (cf 8% in 1999)
    • But routine and manual groups are being left behind
    • 14% difference between professional and routine and manual!
  • Understanding the routine and manual group
    • Prevalence currently 29%
    • Routine and manual workers are split 60% vs 40%, men vs women
    • 42% aged 25-45 (cf 35% in general population)
    • 39% have children aged 0-15 (compared to 31% of the population)
    • Most prevalent in North (NW, NE, Yorkshire) and Midlands
    • Employment subject to old-fashioned gender divide and concentrated in relatively few sectors
  • HGV Drivers (363,000) Storage Handling (271,000) Sales & Retail (233,000) Van Drivers (174,000) Labourers (Building) (169,000) 62% under 35 68% over 45 76% more likely to be single *Top 10 Jobs for Routine and Manual Men & Women (NRS) Our insight generation work has taken us into the home and workplace Sales & Retail (884,000) Carers (581,000) Cleaners / Domestics (549,000) Educational Assistants (295,000) Kitchen & Catering Assistants (288,000) 65% over 45
  • Research showed how challenging an audience they are
    • More addicted than other smokers
      • Heavier smokers, most likely to have started before 16
      • Least likely to intend to give up in the next six months
    • Less likely to believe in/picture success
      • Lower self confidence, poor image on non-smokers
      • Peer/community pressure to smoke
    • Smoking plays a very important role in their lives
      • Signals membership of a community
      • Fulfils every emotional need
      • Smoking positives outweigh negatives
      • Although they try to quit at the same rate as other population groups, they are less likely to be successful
  • Key insights
    • Most family/friends smoke - a shared pastime and part of social activity
    • Yet they’re made to feel like ‘social lepers’
    • Negative view of non-smokers
    • Relapse because of the lack of emotional support from partners and peers
  • 1. Acquisition and lead generation … .to stimulate quit attempts and drive significant volumes to all the NHS response channels (e.g. website or helpline). … .to trigger quitting-related actions, and quit attempts by using third party influencers, such as healthcare professionals and employers . 2. Stakeholder activation … ..to increase quitting success rates of those who have contacted the NHS (e.g. via the helpline, website, interactive TV or SMS) for support 3. Lead management & conversion Key Marketing Activities
    • Focus on routine and manual workers
    • Not focused on mass advertising
    • Integrated strategy drawing on all available marketing levers
    • Marketing based on new insights
    • Focused on triggering action and making quitting easier
    What’s different?
  • Local Examples
    • Smoking in pregnant mothers - Tayside, Scotland
    • Vitality - Essex, England
    • Kick the Habit - London, England
  • “Give it up for Baby”
    • Smoking in pregnant mothers - Tayside, Scotland
    • Target - NHS Tayside reduce by 20% by 2010
    • 2006/7 - only 6 pregnant women contacted smoking cessation services - no successful quitters
  • Insight on pregnant women
    • Women in lower socio-economic groups predominant smokers (35%-40%)
    • In their groups smoking a social norm
    • All their friends smoke - alienation if they stop
    • Smoking a reward
    • They feel clinicians don’t understand them
    • Want long-term support on a number of issues not just smoking
  • Incentives - key to success
    • £12.50 shopping voucher - if they stay smoke free
    • Weekly check-ups
    • Nicotine replacement therapy
    • Sustained support including debt management, literacy classes
    • Training clinicians
    • Results just under 200 pregnant mothers quit in first year
  • Vitality - England
    • High rates of deprivation in South-west Essex
    • Neighbourhoods - 10 years difference in mortality rates
    • 40% people smoke - major health risk
    • Very low rates of smoking cessation
  • Insight - it’s not just about smoking
    • Wanted - integrated service where all health matters were dealt with, weight, stress management, alcohol and smoking
    • Confused about where to go and want services were available
    • Health professionals unwelcoming and didn’t understand their concerns
    • Lack of confidence - “I’ve tried to quit and failed”
  • One-stop-shop for everything!
    • Health and wellbeing centres
    • Clearly signposted with recruitment campaigns in doctors, supermarkets, work places
    • Free access to stop smoking health kits
    • One to one support and drop in sessions
    • Walking, running, cycling groups - social centre for the area
    • Results - exceeded previous year smoking cessation by 32%
  • Kick the Habit - football and smoking
    • Smoking in Greenwich, London very high rates - 45% men in lower social classes
    • Men - a key target
    • Football - men “live and breathe”
    • Need incentives
    • Non clinical environment
    • Mutual support
  • Smoking cessation - run by football
    • Charlton Football Club
    • Coaches/players involved in sessions at convenient times
    • Recruitment through workplace/social environments
    • Football related rewards - tickets
    • Younger men - coaching
    • Non-clinical environment
    • Full health MOT’s
  • Final thoughts
    • It’s really all about listening to the people you’re trying to help and then acting on the insight you’ve gained
    • It’s not complicated and we’re here at the National Social Marketing Centre to help.
    • www.nsmcentre.org.uk
  • Objectives, Audiences, insight Benefits Barriers Product implement Impact - objectives A Final thought!