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OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012
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OSHA Most Frequently Cited General Industry Standards 2012

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  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 1910.1200(e)(1) Employers shall develop, implement, and maintain at each workplace, a written hazard communication program which at least describes how the criteria specified in paragraphs (f), (g), and (h) of this section for labels and other forms of warning, material safety data sheets, and employee information and training will be met, and which also includes the following:
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 1910.1200(e)(1) – no written program 1910.1200(h)(1) Employers shall provide employees with effective information and training on hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial assignment, and whenever a new physical or health hazard the employees have not previously been trained about is introduced into their work area. Information and training may be designed to cover categories of hazards (e.g., flammability, carcinogenicity) or specific chemicals. Chemical-specific information must always be available through labels and material safety data sheets.
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 620 Serious, 5 willful, 20 repeat. $1.4M 1910.147(c)(4)(i) Procedures shall be developed, documented and utilized for the control of potentially hazardous energy when employees are engaged in the activities covered by this section. Note: Exception: The employer need not document the required procedure for a particular machine or equipment, when all of the following elements exist: (1) The machine or equipment has no potential for stored or residual energy or reaccumulation of stored energy after shut down which could endanger employees; (2) the machine or equipment has a single energy source which can be readily identified and isolated; (3) the isolation and locking out of that energy source will completely deenergize and deactivate the machine or equipment; (4) the machine or equipment is isolated from that energy source and locked out during servicing or maintenance; (5) a single lockout device will achieve a locker-out condition; (6) the lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the servicing or maintenance; (7) the servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other employees; and (8) the employer, in utilizing this exception, has had no accidents involving the unexpected activation or reenergization of the machine or equipment during servicing or maintenance.
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 620 Serious, 5 willful, 20 repeat. $1.4M 1910.147(c)(4)(i) Procedures shall be developed, documented and utilized for the control of potentially hazardous energy when employees are engaged in the activities covered by this section. Note: Exception: The employer need not document the required procedure for a particular machine or equipment, when all of the following elements exist: (1) The machine or equipment has no potential for stored or residual energy or reaccumulation of stored energy after shut down which could endanger employees; (2) the machine or equipment has a single energy source which can be readily identified and isolated; (3) the isolation and locking out of that energy source will completely deenergize and deactivate the machine or equipment; (4) the machine or equipment is isolated from that energy source and locked out during servicing or maintenance; (5) a single lockout device will achieve a locker-out condition; (6) the lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the servicing or maintenance; (7) the servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other employees; and (8) the employer, in utilizing this exception, has had no accidents involving the unexpected activation or reenergization of the machine or equipment during servicing or maintenance.
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 620 Serious, 5 willful, 20 repeat. $1.4M 1910.147(c)(4)(i) Procedures shall be developed, documented and utilized for the control of potentially hazardous energy when employees are engaged in the activities covered by this section. Note: Exception: The employer need not document the required procedure for a particular machine or equipment, when all of the following elements exist: (1) The machine or equipment has no potential for stored or residual energy or reaccumulation of stored energy after shut down which could endanger employees; (2) the machine or equipment has a single energy source which can be readily identified and isolated; (3) the isolation and locking out of that energy source will completely deenergize and deactivate the machine or equipment; (4) the machine or equipment is isolated from that energy source and locked out during servicing or maintenance; (5) a single lockout device will achieve a locker-out condition; (6) the lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the servicing or maintenance; (7) the servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other employees; and (8) the employer, in utilizing this exception, has had no accidents involving the unexpected activation or reenergization of the machine or equipment during servicing or maintenance.
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 566 serious, 1 willful, 14 repeat. $868K 1910.178(l)(1)(i) The employer shall ensure that each powered industrial truck operator is competent to operate a powered industrial truck safely, as demonstrated by the successful completion of the training and evaluation specified in this paragraph (l).
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 1910.212(a)(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks. Examples of guarding methods are-barrier guards, two-hand tripping devices, electronic safety devices, etc. Also, notice on the slide that there are fixture channels on the shear table that are unguarded.  Those channels permit the guards to be bypassed and are often not taken into account when the employer measures the opening between the guard and the table.  There was an amputation at Seal Tite a couple of years ago when the operator had his hand go under the guard (we think because of an open fixture channel) and into the blade. 
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] Top in violation Bottom shows the lower blade guard and anti- kick back device.
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address] 1910.212(a)(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards such as those created by point of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, flying chips and sparks. Examples of guarding methods are-barrier guards, two-hand tripping devices, electronic safety devices, etc. Also, notice on the slide that there are fixture channels on the shear table that are unguarded.  Those channels permit the guards to be bypassed and are often not taken into account when the employer measures the opening between the guard and the table.  There was an amputation at Seal Tite a couple of years ago when the operator had his hand go under the guard (we think because of an open fixture channel) and into the blade. 
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Sauk Valley Safety Day March 2009 Nancy M. Quick, CSP, CIH Aurora Area Office [email_address]
  • Transcript

    • 1. Most Frequently Cited SeriousOSHA Standards – General IndustryFY 2012OSHA Safety Day , March 12, 2013OSHA Safety Day , March 12, 2013Sauk Valley Community CollegeSauk Valley Community College
    • 2. #1 1910.1200(e)(1)• Need written hazardcommunicationprogram (your localOSHA office canprovide you with asample electronicprogram)• Must contain a list ofhazardous chemicals,MSDS (SDS) labels,employee info &training.First trigger date underRevised haz com standard isDecember 1, 2013 – must trainemployees on new label elementsAnd SDS format.
    • 3. #1 1910.1200(e)(1)• No training ofemployees in thehazards of chemicals• Signs and symptomsof exposure• Emergency response(visual, odors)• Physical & healthhazards
    • 4. #1 1910.1200(e)(1)When is a hazhaz com reallyserious???
    • 5. #1 1910.1200(e)(1)• Methanol-containingwasher fluid. Labelreads: “Cutting,welding or grindingon containersmight cause fire,explosion orrelease of harmfulfumes.”
    • 6. #1 1910.1200(e)(1)• Improper mixing ofcleaning chemicalsmay cause chlorine andammonia gas release.• Exposure can causeeye and respiratorytract irritation,dizziness, cough, chestpain, pulmonaryedema, lung injury,pneumonia, asthma-like symptoms, etc.
    • 7. #2 1910.147(c)(4).147(c)(4)(i)Procedures shallbe developed,documented &utilized for thecontrol ofpotentiallyhazardous energywhen employeesare engaged in theactivities coveredby this section.
    • 8. #2 1910.147(c)(4)• Lockout/tagoutprocedures are notjust for maintenanceemployees!• Machine operatorswho clear jams,make adjustmentsand clean machineparts may need tolock out also.
    • 9. #2 1910.147(c)(4)• .Typical lockout observed.
    • 10. #2 1910.l47(c)(4)Less typical lockout observed. This lockout device is amechanical pin, inserted beneath a stacker to prevent agravity hazard while employees are beneath the stacker.
    • 11. #2 1910.147(c)(4)Mechanical pin that locks out gravity hazard.
    • 12. #3 1910.178(l)• The employer shallensure that eachpowered industrial truckoperator is competent tooperate a poweredindustrial truck safely, asdemonstrated by thesuccessful completion ofthe training andevaluation specified inthis paragraph (l).
    • 13. #3 1910.178(l)Training includes a variety of vehicles suchas order pickers and motorized pallet jacks.
    • 14. #4 1910.212 (a)(1)• One or more methods of machineguarding shall be provided to protect theoperator and other employees in themachine area from hazards such as thosecreated by point of operation, ingoingnip points, rotating parts, flying chipsand sparks. Examples of guardingmethods are barrier guards, two-handtripping devices, electronic safety devices,etc.
    • 15. #4 1910.212 (a)(1)• Lathes• Need a chip guard formany operations• When jaws extendpast chuck, a guardwould be needed.
    • 16. #4 1910.212 (a)(1)• Injection MoldingMachine• Most haveinterlocked gate asa guarding means.• What other safetydevices might thismachine have?
    • 17. #4 1910.212 (a)(1)• Tube Benders• 2-hand controls areeffective• Pressure mats can beused to avoid thetubes that are beingbent.
    • 18. #4 1910.212 (a)(1)• Printing presses• They must beguarded at thein-running nippoints of the rollers.
    • 19. #4 1910.212(a)(1)• Employer installedelectric eye beamacross length ofingoing nip point(between rollers) onthis conveyor line.• Electric eyes aretested at beginning ofshift to be suremachine stops whenbeam broken.
    • 20. #8 1910.212(a)(1)Large rollers at end of plasticsde-baling machine conveyor.Employees protected by fallrestraints not allowingthem to get closer than 3 feet.Diagram of employee caught iningoing nip point between largerollers.
    • 21. #4 1910.212(a)(1)Employee’s hand slipped into unguarded portion of blade.
    • 22. #4 1910.212(a)(1)Employer obtained retrofit guard kit from manufacturer.
    • 23. #4 1910.212(a)(i)• Shears• Guards must prevententry to cutting blade.• This shear has had its“finger” guards bentback in violation.• The guard must alsoprevent access tothe hold-downs,
    • 24. #4 1910 .212(a)(i)Foot pedal-operated iron worker needspoint of operation guarding. Optionsinclude barrier guard, 2-hand controls,restraints, restrict POO opening to ¼”
    • 25. #4 1910.212(a)(i)• Vertical Bandsaw• Adjustable guard toheight of product• Many injuries byguiding product intoPOO• Handling cold slipperyproducts, such as infood processing, willincrease chances ofslipping into POO
    • 26. #4 1910.212(a)(i)• Radial Arm Sawscutting metal• Lower bladeawareness device• Retracts to originalposition• Does not extend pastplane of table• Anti-kick back device
    • 27. #4 1910.212(a)(i)• Shears• Guards must prevententry to cutting blade.• This shear has had its“finger” guards bentback in violation.• The guard must alsoprevent access tothe hold-downs,
    • 28. #5 1910.134(e)(1)• The employer shallprovide a medicalevaluation to determinethe employee’s ability touse a respirator, beforethe employee is fit testedor required to use therespirator in theworkplace.
    • 29. #6 1910.305(g)(1)(iv)… Flexible cords & cables may not be:A)Used as a substitute for fixed wiring of a structureB)Run through holes in walls, ceilings or floorsC)Run through doorways, windows or similar openings;D)Attached to building surfacesE)Concealed behind bldg. walls, ceilings , floorsF)Installed in raceways (unless otherwise permitted)
    • 30. #6 1910.305(g)(1)Damaged flexible cords from misuse exposeemployees to electrical shock and fire hazards.
    • 31. #6 1910.305(g)(1)Extension cord run up wall, acrossceiling and down opposite wall topower a pump.
    • 32. #6 1910.305(g)(1)• Hazard: Flexiblecord is runthrough hole inthe wall from oneroom to anotherinside the plant.
    • 33. #7 1910.303(b)(2)• Installation anduse. Listed orlabeled equipmentshall be used orinstalled inaccordance withany instructionsincluded in thelisting or labeling.A relocatable power tap (RPT) isused in an industrial setting, not inaccordance with listing/labelinginstructions.
    • 34. #7 1910.303(b)(2)Knockout style box use on flexible cord created shock hazard.Equipment not used per directions in listing and labeling.
    • 35. #7 1910.303(b)(2)One method of abatement is tomount the knockout style boxes anduse with conduit.
    • 36. #8 1910.219(d)(1)• Pulleys, any parts ofwhich are seven (7)feet or less from thefloor or workingplatform, shall beguarded inaccordance with thestandards specified inparagraphs (m) and(o) of this section.Ingoing Nip Point
    • 37. #4 1910.219 (d)(1)• The in running nip ofthe roller fabric andthe driver roller(pulley) must beguarded.• This conveyor is wellguarded.
    • 38. #8 1910.219(d)(1)MSHA Fatality – Employee caught in unguardedpulley when standing on work platform.
    • 39. #9 1910.132(d)(1)• The employer shallassess the workplaceto determine ifhazards are present,or likely to bepresent, whichnecessitate the useof personal protectiveequipment (PPE)
    • 40. #9 1910.132(d)(1)This employer’s PPE hazard assessment determinedthat all employees cutting fish would wear a metal meshglove on the hand opposite the hand holding the knife.
    • 41. #10 1910.23(c)(1)• Protection of open-side floors, platformsand runways. Every oopen-sided floor orplatform 4 feet or more above adjacentfloor or ground level shall be guarded by astandard railing (or the equivalent perpara. (e)(3)on all open sides excpet whenthere is entrance to a ramp, stairway, orfixed ladder.
    • 42. #10 1910.23(c)(1)Employee exposed to fall while standing ontop of machine.
    • 43. #10 1910.23(c)(1)Employee exposed to fall on top of tanker truck – he wasOK until he stepped off the ladder.
    • 44. #10 1910.23(c)(1)Personal Fall Arrest System(PFAS) anchorage point (5,000lbs) and retractable lanyardinstalled in milk depot foremployees needing to access topof tanker trucks.A PFAS can usually be usedin lieu of guardrails whenguardrails are not feasibleor practical.
    • 45. Resources• OSHA website: www.osha.gov• State of Illinois Onsite Consultation Service– www.illinoisosha.com (312) 814-2337USDOL-OSHA Aurora Area Office: 630-896-8700
    • 46. Disclaimer LanguageThis information has been developed by an OSHA Compliance Officer and isintended to assist employers, workers, and others as they strive to improveworkplace health and safety. While we attempt to thoroughly address specifictopics (or hazards), it is not possible to include discussion of everythingnecessary to ensure a healthy and safe working environment in a presentationof this nature. Thus, this information must be understood as a tool foraddressing workplace hazards, rather than an exhaustive statement of anemployer’s legal obligations, which are defined by statute, regulations, andstandards. Likewise, to the extent that this information references practices orprocedures that may enhance health or safety, but which are not required by astatute, regulation, or standard, it cannot, and does not, create additional legalobligations. Finally, over time, OSHA may modify rules and interpretations inlight of new technology, information, or circumstances; to keep apprised of suchdevelopments, or to review information on a wide range of occupational safetyand health topics, you can visit OSHA’s website at www.osha.gov.

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