Manlift Safety for Users
Draft 1 24 2011
Problem
• Numerous deaths from riding manlifts
• CSHO’s have been riding the manlifts on
some inspection
• Need for consis...
Solution
• Fit for duty Criteria
• Training
• Hands on Inspection Class
• Testing/Certification
• Pre ride risk assessment...
Fatality
• At approximately 12:15p.m. on December 22, 2004,
Employee #1, working for Bartlett Grain Co. in Kansas
City, MO...
Another Fatality
• At approximately 8:45a.m. on January 29, 2009,
Employee #1, working for Archer Daniel Midlands in
Linco...
Preliminary Before Use
• Only authorized employees, trained in their
use, shall be permitted to use manlifts.
• You must h...
Pre-use Inspection
• Inspect landing spaces to ensure that it is open and clear of
any objects that might interfere with p...
• 1910.68(c)(3)(i)Minimum depth. Steps
or platforms shall be not less than 12
inches nor more than 14 inches deep,
measure...
• 1910.68(c(3(v)Surfaces.
The upper or working
surfaces of the step shall
be of a material having
inherent nonslip
charact...
Riding Precautions
• Only one rider per step allowed.
• Both hands must be free.
• Face the belt directly.
• Grasp the han...
Precautions
• If the manlift stops, be sure everyone using it
is in the clear before having the employer is
starting it up...
Precautions
• No tools or other objects of any kind should
be carried, except those that can be
completely enclosed in a p...
Periodic Inspection
• All manlifts shall be inspected by a competent
designated person at intervals of not more than
30 da...
Periodic Inspections
This periodic inspection shall cover but is not limited to
the following items:
• Steps.
• Step Faste...
ANSI
• ANSI Safety Standard for
Belt Manlifts
• ASME A90.1-2009
• Floor openings
• Riding Clearance
• Vertical Clearance
•...
Further
• Wind Energy Fit for Duty is similar
• Region V Wind Energy policy at Robin who is
working with Occ Docs.
• Thank...
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Manlift safety 1 26 11 final

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This is a ppt discussing the ANSI standards for Manlifts. Many grain mills are going to elevators. Too many deaths from these.

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  • An employee arrived to work late and went to the top of a grain elevator to set up for cleaning the silo. The coworker went down in the man lift to the ground level. As he was walking around the building, he heard a loud noise on the dump grating. He ran around and saw the employee lying on the grate. He was not breathing and did not have a pulse and an ambulance was called. He was pronounced dead at the scene. The employee fell 122 feet and 3 inches and there was a 43-inch guardrail installed around the platform at the top of the elevator. The coroner's autopsy report and transcript listed the cause of death as suicide. Xpsx Mar 2003 Ee1 was riding a belt manlift when he fell ~80-100 feet to the first landing which was 20 feet above the ground. No witnesses to the accident. Jun 2000 Employee #1, an 18-year-old summer helper, was in the manlift cage of a grain elevator when he fell out and was killed. Xpsx
  • Most of  the accidents below are state plans, these are not required to be reported to Federal OSHA in most case.  Event Date: 12/02/2008 Employee fell from a belt manlift. The employee was discoved on the ascending side of teh belt manlift in the basement. A broken step was observed on the basement floor. The exact height from which the employee fell is undetermined, however the brackets from the broken step were located approximately 34'8" from the basement floor.   Event date: 10/06/2006 an employee was accessing a manlift, when he lost his balance and fell through the floor opening. The employee fell approximately 23 feet, from the sixth to the fourth floor. He substained a concussion, three-fractured vertebra, a fractured left shoulder blade, and broken ribs. The employee was treated by emergency medical personnel and was transported to the hospital, where he was hospitalized for 80 days.    Event Date: 07/10/2004 Employee #1 was accessing the valet manlift on the fifth floor of the Silver Legacy parking Garage.  Employee #1 fell approximately 55 feet from the fifth level to the firdt level, landing on manlift platform. The employee fell through four oval floor opening (one on each level) measuring 37 inches by 27 inches. He later died.  Event Date: 07/26/1999 Employee #1 an 18 year old summer helper, was in the manlift cage of a grain elevator when he fell out and was killed.   
  • Allowable size . Floor openings for both the "up" and "down" runs shall be not less than 28 inches nor more than 36 inches in width for a 12-inch belt; not less than 34 inches nor more than 38 inches for a 14-inch belt; and not less than 36 inches nor more than 40 inches for a 16-inch belt and shall extend not less than 24 inches, nor more than 28 inches from the face of the belt.
  • 1910.68(c)(3)(iii) Distance between steps . The distance between steps shall be equally spaced and not less than 16 feet measured from the upper surface of one step to the upper surface of the next step above it.   1910.68(c)(3)(iv) Angle of step . The surface of the step shall make approximately a right angle with the "up" and "down" run of the belt, and shall travel in the approximate horizontal position with the "up" and "down" run of the belt.
  • Manlift safety 1 26 11 final

    1. 1. Manlift Safety for Users Draft 1 24 2011
    2. 2. Problem • Numerous deaths from riding manlifts • CSHO’s have been riding the manlifts on some inspection • Need for consistent policy. • Numerous fatality – NOT just in grain, but manufacturing and others. • Do we need to take the risk?
    3. 3. Solution • Fit for duty Criteria • Training • Hands on Inspection Class • Testing/Certification • Pre ride risk assessment with supervisor approval. • Manlift Checklist for Inspection • Authorized Manlift Rider Record Retention
    4. 4. Fatality • At approximately 12:15p.m. on December 22, 2004, Employee #1, working for Bartlett Grain Co. in Kansas City, MO, was operating a manlift when he fell backward. As Employee #1 fell, he struck a steel guard and eventually landed on a concrete floor. He suffered fatal blunt force trauma injuries. Employee #1 used the man lift multiple times daily; traveling to work areas on upper and lower levels of the facility. The exact distance he fell is inconclusive. • Many others in notes
    5. 5. Another Fatality • At approximately 8:45a.m. on January 29, 2009, Employee #1, working for Archer Daniel Midlands in Lincoln, NE was riding a belt operated manlift when he fell approximately 80ft. to his death. As Employee #1 fell nearly 22ft, he struck an air duct system knocking it 19ft from its connection point causing him to fall through the manhole falling an additional 40ft hitting each wall and landing on a concrete floor. He suffered fatal blunt force trauma injuries. Employee #1 used the man lift multiple times daily for 32 years; traveling to work areas on upper and lower levels of the facility.
    6. 6. Preliminary Before Use • Only authorized employees, trained in their use, shall be permitted to use manlifts. • You must have passed a hand-on inspection class and certification of training to use/ride a manlift. • Ask employer for inspection logs and repair logs. Review. • Conduct a pre-ride Job Safety Analysis
    7. 7. Pre-use Inspection • Inspect landing spaces to ensure that it is open and clear of any objects that might interfere with people getting on or off the manlift. • Inspect Manlift area for safety, clearances, minimum step size, floor opening size, area landing so there is no debris, wheat or flour or water to slip on, etc.. • Complete Manlift safety inspection checklist (to be developed if we decide to use) • Do not use if any issues unresolved from inspections, JSA or record review.
    8. 8. • 1910.68(c)(3)(i)Minimum depth. Steps or platforms shall be not less than 12 inches nor more than 14 inches deep, measured from the belt to the edge of the step or platform. 1910.68(c)(3)(ii)Width. The width of the step or platform shall be not less than the width of the belt to which it is attached Inspection 1910.68(c)(1)(ii)(b)The width of the belt shall be not less than 12 inches for a travel not exceeding 100 feet, not less than 14 inches for a travel greater than 100 feet but not exceeding 150 feet and 16 inches for a travel exceeding 150 feet.
    9. 9. • 1910.68(c(3(v)Surfaces. The upper or working surfaces of the step shall be of a material having inherent nonslip characteristics (coefficient of friction not less than 0.5) or shall be covered completely by a nonslip tread securely fastened to it Inspection 1910.68(b)(7)(i)Fixed type. On the ascending side of the manlift floor openings shall be provided with a bevel guard or cone meeting the following requirements 1910.68(b)(7)(i)(a)The cone shall make an angle of not less than 45 deg. with the horizontal. An angle of 60 deg. or greater shall be used where ceiling heights permit.
    10. 10. Riding Precautions • Only one rider per step allowed. • Both hands must be free. • Face the belt directly. • Grasp the handhold before placing your foot on the step. • Grasp the handhold firmly with both hands. • Keep both feet square on the step. • Step on or off only at floor levels. • Do not leap to catch a step that has passed the floor landing.
    11. 11. Precautions • If the manlift stops, be sure everyone using it is in the clear before having the employer is starting it up again. • The manlift can be stopped at any point by pulling the control rope in the direction of belt travel. • No unauthorized adjusting or tampering with the electrical controls allowed.
    12. 12. Precautions • No tools or other objects of any kind should be carried, except those that can be completely enclosed in a pocket • Do not use the manlift as a freight-lift for inspection equipment, sampling media, or cases. • Report promptly to management any defect or irregularity in the operation of the manlift. Do not use again.
    13. 13. Periodic Inspection • All manlifts shall be inspected by a competent designated person at intervals of not more than 30 days. • Limit switches shall be checked weekly. • Manlifts found to be unsafe shall not be operated until properly repaired.
    14. 14. Periodic Inspections This periodic inspection shall cover but is not limited to the following items: • Steps. • Step Fastenings.Rails. • Rail Supports and Fastenings. • Rollers and Slides. • Belt and Belt Tension. • Handholds and Fastenings. • Floor Landings. • Guardrails. • Lubrication. • Limit Switches. • Warning Signs and Lights. • Illumination. • Drive Pulley. • Bottom (boot) Pulley and Clearance. • Pulley Supports. • Motor. • Driving Mechanism. • Brake. • Electrical Switches. • Vibration and Misalignment. • "Skip" on up or down run when mounting step (indicating worn gears).
    15. 15. ANSI • ANSI Safety Standard for Belt Manlifts • ASME A90.1-2009 • Floor openings • Riding Clearance • Vertical Clearance • Lighting • Emergency landings • Protection of Entrances and Entrances • Guardrails • Splices • Clearance from floor • Emergency Exit ladder • Superstructure Bracing • Weather Protection • Belt strength, material, width, fastening • Repairs • Annual Tests • Brakes • Warning Signs Top Bottom • Warning Lights • Safety Stops • Stop Start Control rope
    16. 16. Further • Wind Energy Fit for Duty is similar • Region V Wind Energy policy at Robin who is working with Occ Docs. • Thanks to friends that helped. • John Newquist 312 353-5977 • Newquist.john@osha.gov
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