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Ultrasonic cavitation and implosion self presenting

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Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Cavitaton

Fundamentals of Ultrasonic Cavitaton

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  • 1.  
  • 2. Sound . . . Sound Is Vibration Transmitted Through an Elastic Material UltraSound . . . Sound at a Higher Frequency Sound UltraSound
  • 3. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration Think of the black line above as the edge view of a metal plate
  • 4. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration Now Imagine an “Ultrasonic Transducer” Attached to the Metal Plate Ultrasonic Transducer
  • 5. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate Ultrasonic Transducer
  • 6. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 7. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 8. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 9. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 10. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 11. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 12. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 13. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 14. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 15. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 16. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 17. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 18. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 19. Sound is Created by a Source of Vibration The Ultrasonic Transducer Vibrates and Transmits Vibration to the Metal Plate
  • 20. Now Imagine that the Metal Plate is the Bottom of a Vessel or “Tank”
  • 21. Now Imagine that the Metal Plate is the Bottom of a Vessel or “Tank”
  • 22. And that the Tank is Filled with Liquid
  • 23. And that the Tank is Filled with Liquid
  • 24. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 25. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 26. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 27. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 28. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 29. Now Let’s Re-Start the Vibration
  • 30. As the tank bottom raises, it pushes against the liquid thereby compressing it. The blue represents an area of “compression”.
  • 31. The “compression” continues to travel through the liquid away from the source of vibration.
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  • 40. As the tank bottom lowers it “pulls” on the liquid creating an area of negative pressure or “rarefaction”
  • 41. Continued vibration generates areas of compression and rarefaction radiating through the liquid
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  • 65. Now add a pressure gauge to measure pressure at a given point in the liquid + - 0
  • 66. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
  • 67. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
  • 68. 0 + - As the rarefactions and compressions of the sound waves pass by, the gauge sees alternating negative and positive pressure
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  • 91. A vibrating source transmits sound waves to a liquid. Sound waves, consisting of areas of rarefaction (negative pressure) and compression (positive pressure), radiate through the liquid away from the source of vibration.
  • 92. 0 Imagine now a small defect in the liquid consisting of a bubble or speck of dirt . + -
  • 93. . 0 The a “cavitation bubble” starts to grow around the defect under influence of negative pressure + -
  • 94. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  • 95. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  • 96. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  • 97. 0 Growth of the “cavitation bubble” continues and accelerates under increasingly negative pressure + -
  • 98. 0 + -
  • 99. The “cavitation bubble” shrinks under the influence of growing positive pressure 0 + -
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  • 101. 0 The catastrophic collapse of the cavitation bubble under increasing pressure results in implosion! + -
  • 102. 0 The high energy resulting from the implosion of millions of cavitation bubbles do the work associated with ultrasonics + -
  • 103.  

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