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CHP / Cogeneration As An Alternative Energy Resource
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CHP / Cogeneration As An Alternative Energy Resource

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Alternative On-Site Energy Sources - presentation at 2011 Business and the Environment Conference.

Alternative On-Site Energy Sources - presentation at 2011 Business and the Environment Conference.

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  • The Other Clean Energy - often overlooked when we think of onsite or distributed generation.
  • Typical clean energy Solar Wind Overlooked resources: Energy Efficiency Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is... generating electricity right near where it will be used, and then recycling the thermal energy for heating or cooling. It's very efficient, it already supplies 10% of our nation's energy, and it can and should supply more. District Energy is... CHP, heating, and/or cooling for an entire university, office park, medical campus, mixed use sustainable development, or downtown. Over 400 building networks in the U.S. already use district energy, and the number is on the rise. Waste Heat Recovery is... capturing waste heat that an industrial site or pipeline compressor station is already emitting, and turning it into clean and renewable electricity or recycled thermal energy.
  • Combined Heat and Power, or Cogeneration is a system of commercially available technologies concurrently producing both electricity and thermal energy in the form of heating and/or cooling from a single fuel. CHP is a form of local or distributed generation that takes place at or near the point of consumption. These technologies use, recycle or recover heat that would normally be lost – thereby reducing overall fuel use and reducing GHG emissions and other pollutants.
  • Comparing the emissions of separate generation vs. cogeneration: There is about one half the emissions from a cogeneration system as compared to separate generation. Example based on a 5 MW gas turbine with 75% overall efficiency, as compared to typical fossil fuel based electricity with 7% Transmission and Distribution losses and an 80% efficient boiler.
  • CHP plays an important role in meeting the United States' energy needs as well as in reducing the environmental impact of power generation, including:

CHP / Cogeneration As An Alternative Energy Resource CHP / Cogeneration As An Alternative Energy Resource Presentation Transcript

  • Alternative On-Site Energy Sources The Other Clean Energy: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) from Natural Gas John A. Thornton CleanFuture LLC [email_address] Portland, Oregon USA November 8-9, 2011
  • Clean Energy On-Site Resources
    • Solar
    • Wind
    • Energy Efficiency
    • Recycled Energy
      • Combined Heat and Power (CHP), also known as Cogeneration
      • District Energy
      • Waste Heat Recovery
  • Combined Heat and Power (CHP) or Cogeneration is:
    • The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy.
    • A type of distributed generation , which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption.
    • A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling.
  • Separate Generation: Efficiency
  • Separate Generation vs. Cogeneration / CHP: Efficiency
  • Separate Generation vs. Cogeneration / CHP: Emissions
  • Lost Energy in the U.S. Power System Lost Heat Source: U.S. Department of Energy – Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2007
  • Sources Uses
  • Sources Uses Recycle Energy!
  • Benefits of CHP
    • Efficiency Benefits
      • CHP requires less fuel to produce a given energy output, and avoids transmission and distribution losses that occur when electricity travels over power lines.
    • Economic Benefits
      • CHP can save facilities considerable money on their energy bills due to its high efficiency and can provide a hedge against unstable energy costs
    • Environmental Benefits
      • Because less fuel is burned to produce each unit of energy output, CHP reduces air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Cost of CO 2 Reduction Technologies
  • Pacific Northwest CHP Market Assessment
    • Today (Installed now)
    • 3.8 gigawatt
    • 146 facilities
    • Future Potential (20 yr.)
    • Technical Potential
      • 15.5 gigawatt
        • 60% at existing facilities
    • Economic Potential
      • 2.1 to 6.2 gigawatt
    Source: Combined Heat and Power in the Pacific Northwest: Market Assessment. Oak Ridge National Laboratories (2004)
  • CHP Potential by Application Source: Combined Heat and Power in the Pacific Northwest: Market Assessment. Oak Ridge National Laboratories (2004)
  • Cogeneration Project Examples:
    • Animal and Dairy Farms
    • Breweries
    • Correctional Facilities
    • Data Centers
    • District Energy Plants
    • Ethanol Plants
    • Food Processing Facilities
    • Forest Products
    • Health Clubs
    • Healthcare Facilities
    • High Schools
    • Hotels
    • Laboratories
    • Manufacturing Facilities
    • Metals
    • Military Facilities
    • Multifamily Housing
    • Museums
    • National Parks
    • Office Buildings and Skyscrapers
    • Pipelines
    • Pulp and Paper Facilities
    • Refineries
    • Supermarkets
    • Universities and Colleges
    • Utilities
    • Waste and Wastewater Treatment Facilities
    • Wineries
  • Cogeneration Project Examples:
    • Animal and Dairy Farms
    • Breweries
    • Correctional Facilities
    • Data Centers
    • District Energy Plants
    • Ethanol Plants
    • Food Processing Facilities
    • Forest Products
    • Health Clubs
    • Healthcare Facilities
    • High Schools
    • Hotels
    • Laboratories
    • Manufacturing Facilities
    • Metals
    • Military Facilities
    • Multifamily Housing
    • Museums
    • National Parks
    • Office Buildings and Skyscrapers
    • Pipelines
    • Pulp and Paper Facilities
    • Refineries
    • Supermarkets
    • Universities and Colleges
    • Utilities
    • Waste and Wastewater Treatment Facilities
    • Wineries
  • Is CHP / cogen right for my facility?
    • Do you have thermal loads throughout the year (including steam, hot water, hot air, chilled water, refrigeration, etc.)?
    • Are you concerned about the impact of current or future energy costs on your business?
    • Have you already implemented energy efficiency measures and still have high energy costs ?
    • Does your facility have an existing central plant?
    • Are you interested in reducing your facility's impact on the environment?
  • Summary: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) / Cogeneration is:
    • A viable solution to reduce energy and environmental impacts.
      • Waste heat can be captured to generate zero emission electricity
    • A suite of various technologies (not a single solution).
    • Increasingly competitive at smaller scale.
  • Thank you
      • John Thornton
        • [email_address]
        • 503-806-1760
  • Pre-Feasibility / Feasibility Study
  • Five Step Analysis