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Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle
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Measuring the adaptive capacity of Southern Queensland farmers to climate change. Kerry Bridle

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Presentation from the WCCA 2011 conference in Brisbane, Australia.

Presentation from the WCCA 2011 conference in Brisbane, Australia.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Background... Quick – followed by research questions?
  • Will fix tableBut wanted to see what you thinkSo the 3 regionsThe indicators and mean scores for each – brown are the common indicators across all regionsSo can see what are regional and what are ‘national’ indicators/issues.
  • Will fix tableBut wanted to see what you thinkSo the 3 regionsThe indicators and mean scores for each – brown are the common indicators across all regionsSo can see what are regional and what are ‘national’ indicators/issues.
  • Will fix tableBut wanted to see what you thinkSo the 3 regionsThe indicators and mean scores for each – brown are the common indicators across all regionsSo can see what are regional and what are ‘national’ indicators/issues.
  • Will fix tableBut wanted to see what you thinkSo the 3 regionsThe indicators and mean scores for each – brown are the common indicators across all regionsSo can see what are regional and what are ‘national’ indicators/issues.
  • Will fix tableBut wanted to see what you thinkSo the 3 regionsThe indicators and mean scores for each – brown are the common indicators across all regionsSo can see what are regional and what are ‘national’ indicators/issues.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Peter Brown1, Kerry Bridle1,2, Rhonda Toms-Morgan3, Daniel Rodriguez41CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, 2Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture,3Queensland Murray-Darling Committee , 4University of QueenslandMeasuring the adaptive capacity of SouthernQueensland farmers to climate change
    • 2. BackgroundProject: Developing climate change adaptationstrategies for Australia’s mixed crop-livestockfarming systemsObjectives:• to evaluate the likely regional on-farm impacts ofclimate change and variability• to identify the costs and benefits of regional on-farm climate change adaptation options and barriersto adoption• to increase knowledge and awareness of climatechange impacts and adaptation options
    • 3. What is adaptive capacity?• Adaptation • the decision-making process and the set of actions undertaken to maintain the capacity to deal with current or future predicted change• Adaptive capacity • the preconditions necessary to enable adaptation, including social and physical elements, and the ability to mobilize these elements Coonabarabran, Central West source: Nelson, D. R., Adger, W. N., and Brown, K. (2007). Adaptation to environmental change contributions of a resilience framework. Annual Review of Environment and Resources 32, 11.1-11.25.
    • 4. Why monitor adaptive capacity? Adaptive capacity Attributes of Capacity of rural management households practices Generic capacity to adapt Adoption of specific practices Aspirations of rural householdsUncertain future Response to challenges Degree of uncertainty of threat specific driversNational, State Scale Local/household
    • 5. The 5 capitals – Rural Livelihoods (Ellis 2000)• Human capital – the skills, health (including mental) and education of individuals that contribute to the productivity of labour and capacity to manage land.• Social capital – reciprocal claims on others by virtue of social relationships, the close social bonds that facilitate cooperative action and the social bridging, and linking via which ideas and resources are accessed.• Natural capital – the productivity of land, and actions to sustain productivity, as well as the water and biological resources from which rural livelihoods are derived.• Physical (built) capital – capital items produced by economic activity from other types of capital that can include infrastructure, equipment and improvements in genetic resources (crops, livestock).• Financial capital – the level, variability and diversity of income sources, and access to other financial resources (credit and savings) that together contribute to wealth.
    • 6. National Workshops Climate projections Impacts on crops/livestock• Given the various climate change projections, do you think you will be able to adapt or transform?• How will it impact on your ability to adapt or transform?
    • 7. Scoring and ranking indicators1. What is the rationale for using these indicators?2. Why are they high or low in each region?  What are the important differences between regions?  Is it going up/down/same/don’t know; differences between regions?3. What are the priorities for building adaptive capacity?  Who needs to do what? Low Medium High Constraining Enabling 0 1 2 3 4 5 Not supporting effective Supporting effective Could be improved adaptation adaptation Needs monitoring, may Does not need High priority for action need some action immediate action
    • 8. Queensland workshopsRoma – 350-650 mm rf (summer)Goondi – 350-650 mm rfSEQ – 650-1200 mm rf Roma Brisbane SEQ graziers Goondiwindi
    • 9. Self-assessment of the five capitals for each region ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 10. Human Capital Goondi Roma SEQ National Score FrequencyAge/health 1 3 3 2.3 93%Attitude for change 3.5 2 2 2.6 50%Skilled labour 1 3.5 2.3 71%Business skills 1 2.8 50%Farmer education/experience 3 4 2.9 64%Family support/skills 2Access toinformation 0 ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 11. Social Capital National Goondi Roma SEQ Score FrequencyRural communities 3.5 2 2.9 79%Access to services 2.5 1.9 64%Family unit 2.5 2.4 57%Access to information 2 4 2 3.1 50%Change to traditional 1.5 2.5agricultural land useIsolation/rural decline 2.5Access to labour 2Farmer networks 4 ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 12. Natural Capital Goondi Roma SEQ National Score FrequencyWater resources 3 2.5 2 2.7 93%Soil health 3 3.1 79%Climate 4 2.7 50%Land capability 3 2.5 4Natural resources 3.5 3Landscape amenity 3.5Pests/weeds/diseases 1.5Mining 4Pasture/ground cover 3 ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 13. Physical Capital Goondi Roma SEQ National Score FrequencyRegional infrastructure 2.5 1 4 2.5 100%Genetics (plant/animal) 4 3.3 50%Plant & machinery 2.5 3.3 57%Technology 2 2.9 50%Water infrastructure 4 2 2Communication technology 3 2Access to services 4Farm business size 2.5 ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 14. Financial Capital Goondi Roma SEQ National Score FrequencyEquity/debt 1.5 0 1.4 79%Land price 1 2.5 1 2.1 79%Off farm income 3.5 4.5 3 3.5 71%Cost of production 1.5 1.4 64%Value for products 0.5Attitude for investment 0.5Business management 2Enterprise diversification 3.5Financial policy 1.5Market access 4Access to credit 1 ≤2 = constraining ≥3 = enabling
    • 15. Summary• Preliminary results from the 14 workshops indicate that there are approximately 20 indicators for the five capitals that are common across the country• Most indicators are not restricted to climate change or to particular enterprises• These indicators may score highly in some areas but low in others – context is important• Whether an indicator is perceived to be constraining or enabling is more important than the score itself• Additional indicators are locally relevant• The rural livelihoods methodology allows us to collect relatively complex information which can then be sorted according to different needs/audiences at a range of scales
    • 16. AcknowledgementsWe thank the regional facilitators who organised the workshops and all workshop participants from around the country who volunteered their time to assist with this project.We also thank the other researchers involved in the project for providing information on climate projections for crops, pastures and livestock in each region.
    • 17. CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences Tasmanian Institute of AgricultureDr Peter Brown Dr Kerry BridleSenior Research Scientist Research FellowPhone: 02 6242 1562 Phone: 03 6226 2837Email: Peter.Brown@csiro.au Email: Kerry.Bridle@utas.edu.auWeb: www.cse.csiro.au Web: www.cse.csiro.au Contact Us Phone: 1300 363 400 or +61 3 9545 2176 Email: enquiries@csiro.au Web: www.csiro.au

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