Economics of growing mungbean  after rice in the rainfed lowlands of                CambodiaCARDI           Chea Sareth, R...
Constraints•   Rainfed lowland - 84% of rice land•   Single rice crop•   Subsistence level of rice production•   Erratic r...
Potential for second crop• IR66 in early wet season (EWS) is profitable  – Requires high supplementary irrigation• EWS mun...
Objectives• Project  – To develop profitable double-cropping options    for rice/non-rice crops  – To define the water req...
Methodology• Mungbean cultivation  – Paddy fields with typically sandy soils of low fertility    from January to April  – ...
Agronomic range of irrigationYield (kg/ha)                          Water level (mm)
Yields response to irrigation                800                700Yield (kg/ha)                                          ...
Inputs requirement for irrigation             300                                          282             250Labour-day  ...
Total labour inputs              500                                                               Irrigation             ...
Costs and returns  Irrigation        Gross           Cash costs         Net cash returns     level         income         ...
Net cash returns to labour        (grain price: USD 1.5/kg)                 6.0                                           ...
Net cash returns to labour          (grain price: USD 2.0/kg)                  8.0                                      7....
Conclusion• Economic potential if agronomic issues  resolved• Access to supplementary irrigation at  between 0.9 and 1.3 M...
Acknowledgement• Australian Centre for International  Agricultural Research• The University of Queensland
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Economics of growing mungbean after rice in the rainfed lowlands of Cambodia. Sareth Chea

1,445 views
1,207 views

Published on

A presentation at the WCCA 2011 event in Brisbane.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,445
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Economics of growing mungbean after rice in the rainfed lowlands of Cambodia. Sareth Chea

  1. 1. Economics of growing mungbean after rice in the rainfed lowlands of CambodiaCARDI Chea Sareth, Rob Cramb and Shu Fukai School of Agricultural and Food Sciences
  2. 2. Constraints• Rainfed lowland - 84% of rice land• Single rice crop• Subsistence level of rice production• Erratic rainfall, low soil fertility, insect pests• Large families but 0.5 ha of paddy land• Risk of below subsistence
  3. 3. Potential for second crop• IR66 in early wet season (EWS) is profitable – Requires high supplementary irrigation• EWS mungbean with no supplementary irrigation has problem• Non-rice crops following wet season rice – ACIAR project identify mungbean to be most suitable – Different methods of irrigation – manual, gravity and pump
  4. 4. Objectives• Project – To develop profitable double-cropping options for rice/non-rice crops – To define the water requirements for non-rice crops and predict level of risk• Paper – To conduct economic analysis of mungbean cultivation following rice – To examine net returns with 3 irrigation methods
  5. 5. Methodology• Mungbean cultivation – Paddy fields with typically sandy soils of low fertility from January to April – Raised bed condition – a broadbed formation – Two levels of irrigation and three irrigation methods• Economic measures – Yield and gross incomes (cash) – Outlay of cash for inputs – Family labour input – Net cash return per unit of family labour (NCRL) Gross income – Cash expense NCRL = No. labour-days
  6. 6. Agronomic range of irrigationYield (kg/ha) Water level (mm)
  7. 7. Yields response to irrigation 800 700Yield (kg/ha) 689 600 500 477 400 0.9ML 1.3ML Irrigation levels
  8. 8. Inputs requirement for irrigation 300 282 250Labour-day 200 195 Manual 150 Gravity 100 50 0 5 8 0.9ML 1.3ML Irrigation levels 75 72 70 Pumping hours 65 60 55 50 50 45 40 0.9ML 1.3ML Irrigation levels
  9. 9. Total labour inputs 500 Irrigation 400 Other acitivitiesLabour-days 300 282 195 200 5 8 0 0 100 136 149 136 149 136 149 - 0.9ML 1.3ML 0.9ML 1.3ML 0.9ML 1.3ML Manual Gravity Pumping
  10. 10. Costs and returns Irrigation Gross Cash costs Net cash returns level income (USD/ha) (USD/ha) (ML/ha) (USD/ha) M/G P M/G P 0.9 716 179 213 536 503 1.3 1,034 179 227 854 806M: manual watering; G: gravity-fed; P: pumping
  11. 11. Net cash returns to labour (grain price: USD 1.5/kg) 6.0 5.3 5.3 5.0NCRL (USD/day) 4.0 3.6 3.7 Manual 3.0 Pumping 1.9 1.6 Gravity 2.0 1.0 - 0.9ML 1.3ML Irrigation levels
  12. 12. Net cash returns to labour (grain price: USD 2.0/kg) 8.0 7.6 7.5 7.0 6.0 5.3 5.4 NCRL (USD/day) 5.0 Manual 4.0 Pumping 2.7 3.0 2.3 Gravity 2.0 1.0 - 0.9ML 1.3ML Irrigation levels • Rural wage: USD 2/dayBenchmark • Minimum wage: USD 1.25/day • Industrial wage: USD 1.7-2.8/day
  13. 13. Conclusion• Economic potential if agronomic issues resolved• Access to supplementary irrigation at between 0.9 and 1.3 ML/ha• Manual irrigation gives low returns (NCRL)• Pumping or gravity methods give a reasonable return• Improving returns – increasing effective demand – improved access to fertiliser and credit – electrification• Irrigation and labour limit production
  14. 14. Acknowledgement• Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research• The University of Queensland

×