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AN INTEGRATED SYSTEMS THINKING   DELIBERATIVE PROCESS TO EXPLOREAPPROACHES FOR DEALING WITH LAND USE          ON WATER QUA...
BALANCING COMMUNITY OUTCOMES:                THE CONVERSATION• “One of the most significant challenges to be faced is  the...
WICKED PROBLEMS• The behaviour of resources is complex and this complexity  increases when overlaid with land use and mana...
DIFFERENT APPROACHES ARE REQUIRED Science centric management alone is not enough to address                            the...
THE EXPECTATIONS• Produce a range of solutions which are workable & are  generally supported• Recognition of environmental...
Framework for deliberating and informing water qualitylimits and future pathways            Reflect            reiterate  ...
Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways                                    “common                        ...
Local history and                                                                                                         ...
Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways                                      “common                      ...
The Deliberation Matrix• Analyses the impacts of a range of scenarios across a set of  assessment criteria (Values) for a ...
ORGANISING THE DELIBERATION Scenarios StrategiesStakeholders                      Values (Assessment Criteria)            ...
STAKEHOLDERS                             SCENARIOS•Iwi                        • Scenario 1: Current land use•Pastoral food...
EXAMPLES OF VALUES (ASSESSMENT CRITERIA)Environmental        Social              Cultural             EconomicWater Qualit...
Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways                                            “common                ...
MODELLING NITRATECONCENTRATIONS
Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways                                               “common             ...
Value weightings9080                                                    Pastoral food & fibre70                           ...
Water Quality                       Pastoral           Arable/      food            Enviro                                ...
Framework for deliberating and informing water qualitylimits and future pathways            Reflect            reiterate  ...
RECOMMENDATIONSAgricultural development could take place if it included adaptivemanagement, staged development and adoptio...
REFLECTIONS•Gave a framework to inform the setting of water quality limits andis being used Canterbury wide•Competing valu...
This work was funded under the P21 Environment programme    jointly funded by FRST,DairyNZ, Fonterra and Beef and      Lam...
An integrated systems thinking deliberative process to explore approaches for dealing with land use on water quality. Liz ...
An integrated systems thinking deliberative process to explore approaches for dealing with land use on water quality. Liz ...
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An integrated systems thinking deliberative process to explore approaches for dealing with land use on water quality. Liz Wedderburn

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Presentation from the WCCA 2011 conference in Brisbane, Australia.

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Transcript of "An integrated systems thinking deliberative process to explore approaches for dealing with land use on water quality. Liz Wedderburn"

  1. 1. AN INTEGRATED SYSTEMS THINKING DELIBERATIVE PROCESS TO EXPLOREAPPROACHES FOR DEALING WITH LAND USE ON WATER QUALITYM.E. Wedderburn, D. Bewsell, P. Blackett, S.Kelly, M. Mackay, O. Montes de Oca, I. Brown, K.MaaniAgResearchEnvironment CanterburyWCCA 26th Sept 2011
  2. 2. BALANCING COMMUNITY OUTCOMES: THE CONVERSATION• “One of the most significant challenges to be faced is the strong link between some forms of land use intensification, water use and water quality decline”New Start for Fresh Water– Office of Minister forEnvironment (2009)
  3. 3. WICKED PROBLEMS• The behaviour of resources is complex and this complexity increases when overlaid with land use and management• We have imperfect knowledge and resulting uncertainty• We lack consensus on the issues and therefore the most “appropriate solutions”• Communities are central to the decision making and they have multiple often competing values and are represented by a complex network of political interactions with stakeholders• There is a huge sense of urgency and high stakes are at risk
  4. 4. DIFFERENT APPROACHES ARE REQUIRED Science centric management alone is not enough to address the issues• A movement to include legitimate stakeholder perspectives within new governance models• Creation of adaptive settings to allow inclusive and integrated conversations across the stakeholders
  5. 5. THE EXPECTATIONS• Produce a range of solutions which are workable & are generally supported• Recognition of environmental limits• Recognise social, economic, cultural & environmental values• Some trade-offs may be necessary but if there are the reasons for these will be made open and transparent
  6. 6. Framework for deliberating and informing water qualitylimits and future pathways Reflect reiterate 6 “common 1 problem” Collective Identification Report, 5 recommend learning Organise the problem: 2 Stakeholders 4 Scenarios 3 Deliberate Values Ground impact of deliberation in a Scenarios sound knowledge base
  7. 7. Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways “common 1 problem” Collective Identification learning
  8. 8. Local history and heritage Climate changeWhat are the factors that link Sense of place Social awareness ofland, water and people in the Appropriate river Non commercial good farming Hurunui Catchment Availability of flow recreation Drinking water water Fish population quality... Community Community Hydro generation Biodiversity Water Amenity values People Community wellbeing Well being infrastructure Clear sparkling National economy Sediment water Reliability and efficiency Commercial Local economy Science and of water for irrigation Food gathering tourism innovation Effect of nurients on Pollution Knowledge of the environment advisors Use of environmental Drinking water technologies Land based Land Ngai tahu values quality Migrant labour options Health Environmental Employment policy Farm profitability Safety for kids Land stewardship Agribusiness service
  9. 9. Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways “common 1 problem” Collective Identification learning Organise the problem: 2 Stakeholders Scenarios Values
  10. 10. The Deliberation Matrix• Analyses the impacts of a range of scenarios across a set of assessment criteria (Values) for a set of stakeholder groups• Stakeholders consider the Values and assess the impacts (i.e. acceptable, unacceptable, unsure) of each scenario from their perspective• By making transparent the different impacts of different scenarios on different stakeholders a space for deliberation and debate is opened – The purpose of the matrix is to create this deliberation space – not to provide a mechanical decision• The Deliberation Matrix can be visually represented as a cube
  11. 11. ORGANISING THE DELIBERATION Scenarios StrategiesStakeholders Values (Assessment Criteria) Social, Environmental, Cultural, Economic
  12. 12. STAKEHOLDERS SCENARIOS•Iwi • Scenario 1: Current land use•Pastoral food and fibre•Dairy • Scenario 2: Business as usual•Arable•Agribusiness • Scenario 3: Extensive irrigation•Recreation•Environmental NGO’s • Scenario A: High certainty of•Rural Woman reaching regional policy water•Energy quality objectives•Tourism•Hurunui District Council • Scenario B: Water quality target•Hurunui zone committee 1990-95•Community health
  13. 13. EXAMPLES OF VALUES (ASSESSMENT CRITERIA)Environmental Social Cultural EconomicWater Quality Recreational uses Intergenerational Water availability/allocatioWater quantity Communities Mauri (life force) Regional economy of waterBiodiversity Public access Sense of Profitable land use connectednessLand use intensity Human health Traditional food Energy available harvestSoil Health Reciprocity Spiritual Healthy service metaphysical sector
  14. 14. Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways “common 1 problem” Collective Identification learning Organise the problem: 2 Stakeholders Scenarios 3 Values Ground deliberation in a sound knowledge base
  15. 15. MODELLING NITRATECONCENTRATIONS
  16. 16. Framework for deliberating and informingfuture pathways “common 1 problem” Collective Identification learning Organise the problem: 2 Stakeholders 4 Scenarios 3 Deliberate Values Ground impact of deliberation in a Scenarios sound knowledge base
  17. 17. Value weightings9080 Pastoral food & fibre70 Rural Women60 Local authority and health Arable50 Dairy40 Energy Tourism30 Iwi20 Agribusiness10 Environmental Group Recreation 0 Environmental Economic Social Cultural
  18. 18. Water Quality Pastoral Arable/ food Enviro Dairy NGOs Tourism Energy Rural Horticulture and fibre RecreationScenario WomanAB 1 2 3
  19. 19. Framework for deliberating and informing water qualitylimits and future pathways Reflect reiterate 6 “common 1 problem” Collective Identification Report, 5 recommend learning Organise the problem: 2 Stakeholders 4 Scenarios 3 Deliberate Values Ground impact of deliberation in a Scenarios sound knowledge base
  20. 20. RECOMMENDATIONSAgricultural development could take place if it included adaptivemanagement, staged development and adoption of mitigationsActions were identified to turn unacceptable judgements intoacceptable through the use of the conceptual system map:1.Enabling behaviour (e.g. Implementation of audited selfmanagement with regulation as a back up)2.Informing good management practice i.e. Principles not recipes3.Reinforcing positive feedback cycles (e.g. Ensuring reliable watersupplies)
  21. 21. REFLECTIONS•Gave a framework to inform the setting of water quality limits andis being used Canterbury wide•Competing values were made transparent and unintendedconsequences identified•Collective learning was enhanced and trust built•Translating technical information into the outcomes community’sdesire is an essential part of the process•Key to successful implementation will be regional and localpartnerships between regulators and stakeholders
  22. 22. This work was funded under the P21 Environment programme jointly funded by FRST,DairyNZ, Fonterra and Beef and Lamb New Zealand Also Environment Canterbury
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