Information Literacy           What is it?    What does it look like?   How is it used/ practiced?     How is it evaluated...
What Is It?                 Definition• Information Literacy* refers to:  – Refers to the ability to know what information...
What Is It?   Differences Between Information- 1• Rapid advances in technology have caused the  availability of informatio...
What Is It? Differences Between Information-2• Non-credible sources are also much more  available:  – Websites: unless the...
What Is It? Differences Between Information-3• Generally speaking, websites ending in the  following extensions have these...
What Does It Look Like? -1• The information literate person has the  ability to  – recognize when information is needed;  ...
What Does It Look Like? – 2                 • Internet SearchesLESS RELIABLE    • Wikipedia, Ask                          ...
What Does It Look Like? - 3• The information literate person:  – Understands the differences between credible    and non-c...
What Does It Look Like? - 4         In-text Citations• Information literate persons properly  acknowledge information they...
How Is It Used/ Applied? – 1                academic applications• When writing papers and using information  from other s...
How Is It Used/ Applied? -2                         academic applications• In written work, information literacy refers to...
How Is It Used/ Applied? – 3               business applications• The ability of workers to determine what  information is...
How Is It Used/ Applied? – 4               business applications• In the workplace, the information literate  employee is ...
How Does IL Benefit You?• Individuals armed with the right information at the right  time will be able to use this for pro...
References• Association of College & Research Libraries. (2012). Information  Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Edu...
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Information Literacy

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Understanding information literacy

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Information Literacy

  1. 1. Information Literacy What is it? What does it look like? How is it used/ practiced? How is it evaluated? copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 1 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  2. 2. What Is It? Definition• Information Literacy* refers to: – Refers to the ability to know what information is needed, and understanding how to acquire and evaluate that information (Association of College & Research Libraries,2012). – *May be abbreviated to “IL” in this lecture copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 2 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  3. 3. What Is It? Differences Between Information- 1• Rapid advances in technology have caused the availability of information to proliferate. This includes all kinds of information– from credible sources and non-credible sources.• Scholarly sources are more readily available through Google Scholar and library databases. – Library databases themselves have grown in size and availability. – Internet search engines have developed specialized sub-search engines to locate scholarly sources (i.e. Google Scholar) copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 3 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  4. 4. What Is It? Differences Between Information-2• Non-credible sources are also much more available: – Websites: unless they are owned and managed by reputable organizations, one can never be sure about the quality of the information. – Blogs: these are personal websites controlled by individuals. – Twitter: individual messages that are not controlled or monitored for accuracy. – Etc. copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 4 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  5. 5. What Is It? Differences Between Information-3• Generally speaking, websites ending in the following extensions have these characteristics: – .com = commercial entity (depending on the size and reputation of the enterprise, this may include credible information) – .org = non-profits and may or may not have information substantiated by scholarly research (again, this depends upon the size and reputation of the organization) – .net =networking sites – .gov = government sites (this information is controlled and monitored by government agencies) copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 5 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  6. 6. What Does It Look Like? -1• The information literate person has the ability to – recognize when information is needed; – what kind of information is needed; – is able to locate information efficiently and effectively, – is able to evaluate the information, and – is able to integrate the information within his/her existing knowledge base. copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 6 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  7. 7. What Does It Look Like? – 2 • Internet SearchesLESS RELIABLE • Wikipedia, Ask GeneralINFORMATION Jeeves, About Information; .com, etc lacks • Popular Newspapers substantiation; • Popular Magazines changes overInformation is • Highly Regarded time; no editorial beginning to Newspapers controlbecome more • Trade Journals stable; lasts • Books over time • Corporate Websites • Organization Websites • Government Websites • Educational Websites • Conference Proceedings From here downMORE RELIABLE • Theses; Dissertations information is mostINFORMATION • Scholarly Journals reliable; supported with evidence copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop ,Yorklyn, DE 19736 7
  8. 8. What Does It Look Like? - 3• The information literate person: – Understands the differences between credible and non-credible information • Knows how to determine what sources are appropriate for an assignment • Knows how to cite and reference sources correctly – Can explain in his/her own words why the source information is important or significant – Can use the source information to advance his/her argument copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 8 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  9. 9. What Does It Look Like? - 4 In-text Citations• Information literate persons properly acknowledge information they have obtained from other sources: – Example of an in-text citation from a website: • Commitment to academic excellent has been the theme of Wilmington University. According to President Jack Varsalona, “Wilmington University is committed to academic excellence in our classrooms…an education that challenges critical thinking…” (Varsalona, n.d.). – Example of reference page entry: • Varsalona, J. (n.d.). A Message from the President. Wilmington University, Retrieved April 6, 2012 from http://www.wilmu.edu/president.aspx copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 9 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  10. 10. How Is It Used/ Applied? – 1 academic applications• When writing papers and using information from other sources, the sources need to be cited so as to shown where this information came from. – These are known as in-text citations.• Sources also need to be listed on a reference page at the end of the document. – This is known as the page of “References” in APA style. – MLA style refers to this as “Works Cited”. copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 10 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  11. 11. How Is It Used/ Applied? -2 academic applications• In written work, information literacy refers to using citations in the text (and references at the end) to acknowledge sources.• Example: – What is information literacy? Information literacy refers to one’s ability to find information and use the information to solve a problem or advance an argument (Association of College & Research Libraries, 2012). For college students, recognizing what information is needed and being able to find it quickly is important in being able to complete assignments. According to the National Forum on Information Literacy (2012), a coalition of business, education, and library leaders, developing information literacy skills is a necessary requirement for maintaining an open, democratic society (Para. 1). Driven by rapid advances in technology, information literacy skills have become essential in evaluating various kinds of sources of information. Students need to be able to determine differences between credible and non- credible sources. While information literacy skills are most often thought of as academic skills, these skills are also valuable to consumers in making everyday decisions about products and services, and as citizens in evaluating issues when voting (Information Literacy Skills, 2012, para. 3). copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 11 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  12. 12. How Is It Used/ Applied? – 3 business applications• The ability of workers to determine what information is needed, and where to find that information quickly, and the ability to evaluate the information is a crucial skill for information-literate employees. copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 12 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  13. 13. How Is It Used/ Applied? – 4 business applications• In the workplace, the information literate employee is one who: – Checks facts – Consults documented records – Seeks out expert opinion in print materials – Can sort out and evaluate data quickly – Can synthesize available data and information and draw conclusions copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 13 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  14. 14. How Does IL Benefit You?• Individuals armed with the right information at the right time will be able to use this for problem solving.• Being able to correctly cite sources in one’s own written work will establish credibility of one’s work.• Using evidence from experts and citing the evidence correctly will demonstrate to readers that the student- writer has sought out expert opinion and is able to integrate evidence within his/her argument/ position.• Consumers use information literacy skills to make decisions.• Citizens of a democratic society use information literacy skills to be informed voters. copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop 14 Yorklyn, DE 19736
  15. 15. References• Association of College & Research Libraries. (2012). Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Chicago, IL: American Library Association. http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompet ency• Kirton, J. & Barham, L. (2005). Information literacy in the workplace. Australian Library Journal. [Online]. Australian Library and Information Association. Retrieved April 7, 2012 from http://alia.org.au/publishing/alj/54.4/full.text/kirton.barham.h tml• National Forum on Information Literacy. (2012). What is the NFL? Retrieved April 4, 2012 from http://infolit.org/• University of Idaho. (2012). Information Literacy. Retrieved April 4, 2012 from http://www.webs.uidaho.edu/info_literacy/ 15 copyright 2012 Johanna P. Bishop Yorklyn, DE 19736

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