All Hands on Deck presentation for executive team of Porsche Cars North America

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Slides used for 12-10-10 presentation to the executive leadership team of Porsche Cars North America in Atlanta by Values Coach CEO Joe Tye.

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All Hands on Deck presentation for executive team of Porsche Cars North America

  1. 1. ALL HANDS ON DECK<br />Building a Culture of Ownership on a Foundation of Values<br />Porsche Cars North America<br />December 10, 2010<br />Joe Tye, CEO and Head Coach, Values Coach Inc.<br />Copyright © 2010, Values Coach Inc. <br />
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  5. 5. I make my living as a consultant, but I earn my keep as an…<br />
  6. 6. Insultant!<br />David Corbin, author of Illuminate: The Positive Power of Negative Thinking<br />
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  9. 9. Companies that study employee engagement* consistently find:<br />~ 25% fully engaged<br />~ 60% not engaged<br />~ 15% aggressively disengaged<br />* e.g. Gallup, HR Solutions, Press Ganey<br />
  10. 10. And it’s getting worse :-o<br />“Disengagement, one of the chief causes of underachievement and depression, is on the rise.”<br />Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in HBR, 12-10<br />
  11. 11. Engaged: Spark Plugs<br />
  12. 12. Not Engaged: Zombies<br />
  13. 13. Disengaged: Vampires<br />
  14. 14. At Best Buy, a 0.1% increase in employee engagement generates a $100,000 increase in gross store revenue*<br />* Harvard Business Review, October 2010<br />
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  16. 16. What’s wrong with this picture?<br />
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  19. 19. Soft reallyis hard!<br />1982<br />
  20. 20. So why, 30 years later, have so few companies gotten the message? <br />
  21. 21. “We didn’t undergo fundamental change by our own choice. It was forced on us. The wisest of people or institutions seldom can deduce, on their own, that change is needed. And if they do, they never muster the courage to act on that need.”<br />Bob Lutz, quoted in Crash Course: The American Automobile Industry’s Roadfrom Glory to Disaster by Paul Ingrassia<br />
  22. 22. The journey from mere <br />Accountability <br />to a culture of<br />Ownership<br />
  23. 23. Accountability<br />Doing what you are supposed to do because someone else expects it of you. It springs from the extrinsic motivation of reward and punishment. <br />
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  27. 27. You cannot hold people “accountable” for the things that really matter.<br />
  28. 28. Nobody ever checks the oil in a rental car!<br />
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  30. 30. Ownership<br />Doing what needs to be done because you expect it of yourself. Ownership springs from the intrinsic motivation of pride.<br />
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  33. 33. Job description <br />First and foremost a salesperson, last but not least a janitor, and in between whatever else needs to be done.<br />
  34. 34. Cultural ownership is of the heart, not of the wallet<br />
  35. 35. 64,791– avg 5 stars <br />14,491,733 views <br />As of 12-10-10, 1:18 am<br />
  36. 36. “We have hundreds if not thousands of examples…” <br />522,963<br />
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  39. 39. It could happen to anyone!<br />“Doctors take umbrage at Physicians’ Porsche Promo”<br />Headline in HealthLeaders Media, 11-04-10<br />
  40. 40. “Marketing in the future is like sex. Only the losers will have to pay for it.”<br />Jon Bond, quoted in Fast Company, 12-10/1-11<br />
  41. 41. Joe’s corollary <br />Marketing in the future: a fired up employee with two networks.<br />
  42. 42. The “Empowerment” Conundrum<br />
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  46. 46. Who Owns Left Field?<br />
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  48. 48. You can’t always choose who you have on the bus<br />
  49. 49. You can’t just throw all the “wrong” people off the bus<br />
  50. 50. You can create a bus that everyone wants to ride<br />
  51. 51.
  52. 52. Poet<br />Bean Counter<br />
  53. 53. Emotional intelligence (right brain) is more important to your personal and professional success than intellectual and technical knowledge (left brain)<br />
  54. 54. Management is a job description<br />
  55. 55. Leadership is a life decision<br />
  56. 56. And in today’s world we need leaders in every corner – not just in the corner office<br />
  57. 57. Left Brain Counts<br />Right Brain Creates<br />
  58. 58. Assets or resources?<br />
  59. 59. Rules<br />Values<br />
  60. 60. Plans<br />Inspires<br />
  61. 61. Measured<br />Seen<br />
  62. 62. A Given<br />A Choice<br />
  63. 63. Inert<br />Contagious<br />
  64. 64. Process<br />Attitude<br />
  65. 65. What you do<br />Who you are<br />
  66. 66. Boring!<br />Chaos!<br />
  67. 67. It’s not accountability (left brain) OR ownership (right brain). <br />
  68. 68. It’s how we interrelate the two to create a whole brain culture.<br />
  69. 69. What do you get when you break the word “assume” down into its constituent components?<br />
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  71. 71. Faulty Assumption #1<br />You can’t teach people values – if they didn’t learn in kindergarten, it’s too late.<br />
  72. 72. Faulty Assumption #2<br />Culture is a given – especially in the short term you cannot transform it.<br />
  73. 73. Faulty Assumption #3<br />You can “empower” people without them having doing the work of self-empowerment.<br />
  74. 74. Faulty Assumption #4<br />What can’t be measured won’t get done.<br />
  75. 75. Let’s watch as the word “assumption” gets deconstructed (along with those who made the assumption)<br />
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  77. 77. The “Invisible Architecture” of an organization<br />“Invisible Architecture” is a trademark of Values Coach Inc.<br />
  78. 78. Invisible Architecture™ is more important than bricks & mortar<br />
  79. 79. Invisible architecture is to the soul of your organization what physical architecture is to its body. <br />
  80. 80. “The only assets we have as a company [are] our values, our culture and guiding principles, and the reservoir of trust with our people.”<br />Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz in Harvard Business Review, July-August 2010<br />
  81. 81. Core Values are the Foundation<br />
  82. 82. Built to Last<br />
  83. 83. Core values define what you stand for and what you won’t stand for<br />
  84. 84. “Our Credo is more than just a moral compass. We believe it’s a recipe for business success. The fact that Johnson & Johnson is one of only a handful of companies that have flourished through more than a century of change is proof of that.”<br />
  85. 85. <ul><li> One half the turnover
  86. 86. Double the productivity
  87. 87. Highest customer satisfaction</li></li></ul><li>The 9/12 difference<br />
  88. 88. The single most important thing I have learned in 16 years with Values Coach<br />
  89. 89. ValuesareSkills<br />
  90. 90. Nobody learns everything they need to know in kindergarten!<br />410-page workbook<br />Joe@JoeTye.com<br />
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  92. 92. We call our graduates “Spark Plugs”<br />
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  94. 94. 93<br />“We know from our research that the people who are clearest about their [personal] vision and values are significantly more committed to their organizations than are those who are not clear about their vision and values.”<br />James Kouzes and Barry Posner: A Leader's Legacy<br />
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  96. 96. Corporate culture is the superstructure<br />
  97. 97. Culture is to the organization what personality and character are to the individual. <br />
  98. 98. Culture Eats Strategy for Lunch!<br />
  99. 99. “I came to see, in my decade at IBM, that culture isn’t just one aspect of the game – it is the game.”<br />
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  101. 101. Cultural Toughness<br />
  102. 102. “Success is the ability to bounce from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.”<br />- Winston Churchill <br />
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  104. 104. “We need to see opportunities where others see barriers. We need to be cheerleaders when others are moaning doom-and-gloom.” <br />From The Florence Prescription<br />
  105. 105. “We need to face problems with contrarian toughness because it’s in how we solve those problems that we differentiate ourselves from everyone else.” <br />From The Florence Prescription<br />
  106. 106. “Brick walls are not there to stop you, they are there to make you prove how much you want something.”<br />Randy Pausch: The Last Lecture<br />
  107. 107. Optimism is a learnable skill*<br />* Martin Seligman: Learned Optimism<br />
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  109. 109. Shawneen Buckley of Saint Francis Hospital and Health Center in Poughkeepsie, New York<br />
  110. 110. Emotional attitude is the interior décor<br />
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  113. 113. Emotional attitude is defined by what you expect and by what you tolerate*<br />*to permit is to promote<br />
  114. 114. You cannot have a culture of ownership in an organization where the emotional climate is dominated by Emotional Vampires.<br />
  115. 115. Toxic emotional negativity (T.E.N.) is the emotional and spiritual equivalent of cigarette smoke. <br />
  116. 116. 115<br />“One toxically negative person can drag down morale and productivity of an entire work unit.”<br />The Florence Prescription, page 142<br />
  117. 117. 116<br />“It is a leadership responsibility to create a workplace environment where toxic emotional negativity is not tolerated.”<br />The Florence Prescription, page 142<br />
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  120. 120. The other BMW Club<br />
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  123. 123. Building a Culture of Ownership<br />122<br />
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  125. 125. A Mission that Inspires<br />124<br />
  126. 126.
  127. 127. In its early days, Southwest Airlines wasn’t just selling cheap airline tickets – it was making it possible for Grandma to attend her grandchild’s college graduation. <br />
  128. 128. The most memorable Coke ads barely mention fizzy brown sugar water.<br />
  129. 129. Kids today!<br />
  130. 130. Supportive Structure and Process<br />129<br />
  131. 131. 130<br />
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  134. 134. Foundation of Values<br />133<br />
  135. 135. “Committable core values that are truly integrated into a company’s operations can align an entire organization and serve as a guide for employees to make their own decisions.”<br />Tony  Hsieh: Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose<br />
  136. 136. Zappos Family Core Values<br />Deliver WOW Through Service<br /> Embrace and Drive Change<br /> Create Fun and A Little Weirdness<br /> Be Adventurous, Creative, and Open-Minded<br /> Pursue Growth and Learning<br /> Build Open and Honest Relationships With Communication<br /> Build a Positive Team and Family Spirit<br /> Do More With Less<br /> Be Passionate and Determined<br /> Be Humble<br />Source: Zappos website<br />
  137. 137. 1. Deliver Wow Through Service<br />Core Values Frog thinks anything worth doing is worth doing with WOW. To WOW, CVF differentiates himself by doing things in an unconventional and innovative way. He goes above and beyond the average level of service to create an emotional impact on the receiver and give them a positive story they can take with them the rest of their lives.<br />Source: Zappos website<br />
  138. 138. “Unlike most companies, where core values are just a plaque on the wall, our core values play a big part in how we hire, train, and develop our employees.”<br />Tony  Hsieh: The 2009 Zappos Culture Book*<br />* $1995 at Zappos.com !!!<br />
  139. 139. Culture is morally neutral.<br />Enron had a powerful culture.<br />Core values are the moral compass that shapes a positive corporate culture.<br />
  140. 140. Trust is Expected and Earned <br />139<br />
  141. 141. Lack of trust is like a tax that makes everything cost more and take longer. <br />
  142. 142. “I am absolutely convinced that in most cases, prioritizing trust… will bring personal and organizational benefits that far exceed any other path.”<br />Stephen M.R. Covey: The Speed of Trust: The One Thing that Changes Everything<br />
  143. 143. “We trust each other at HP; never lock this cabinet again.”<br />Note left by Bill Hewlett on a locked cabinet<br />
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  146. 146. Strategic Use of Stories<br />145<br />
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  149. 149.
  150. 150. And now, a motivational word from your manager…<br />
  151. 151. Individual Creativity and Ingenuity<br />150<br />
  152. 152.
  153. 153. 152<br />Can you imagine life without Post-It Notes?<br />
  154. 154. There is always risk when you try to get out of the box<br />
  155. 155. “Buckle up! It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.”<br />
  156. 156. The certainty of misery or the misery of uncertainty<br />
  157. 157. Falling on your face is good for your head (fail early, fail often, fail small).<br />
  158. 158. Pride and Partnership<br />157<br />
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  161. 161. How do you answer the universal icebreaker question?<br />What do you do?<br />
  162. 162. Does your answer convey:<br />I’m good at what I do.<br />I love what I do.<br />I’m proud of what I do.<br />What I do is important. <br />
  163. 163. What could be more boring than industrial ventilation systems?<br />

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