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Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 8th Grade U.S. ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The year is 1775.  Nothing wou...
Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The orders have been sent out, and G...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>It is now June of 1775...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Your generals are looking for ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Ex...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Be...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Ex...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Whew, that was a lot of work. ...
Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Photos Used: http://www.flickr...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 8th Grade U.S...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed to...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is targeted most...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Social Studies Stand...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Click here to see student pr...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Here are some recomm...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page To determine whether or not ...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Having given the students a ...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page History will always be one o...
[ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Photos Used: http://www.flic...
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joel's Educ331

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  1. 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 8th Grade U.S. History Designed by Joel Grove Put Your Name Here Put Your E-mail Address Here Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Flickr: Marion Doss
  2. 2. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The year is 1775. Nothing would make you happier than to wake up before the sun is up, work hard out in the fields all day and go home to your great family. However, this is becoming less and less possible the more Britain seems to impede upon what you have come to believe are your God given rights. There is a lot of things that have made you upset. You weren’t at all happy about the Sugar or Stamp Act nor the blood that had been spilled in attempts to enforce them. What upsets you the most is how those responsible, the British, still occupy Boston and don’t seem to be leaving any time soon. Thankfully, you’ve come across a group of people who believe the same things that you do and together, you are willing to fight for change.
  3. 3. Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The orders have been sent out, and Generals Artemas Ward and Israel Putnam have chosen you to plan out one of the key locations for an eventual attack on the British. Both generals agree it is crucial that the Charleston Peninsula be taken and maintained throughout the course of the war, believing that from this key location, troops can easily be deployed throughout the area. The problem is, the British are not unaware of this strategic location either and will most certainly cause resistance. You will need to study the area, making note of any and all strategic land formations. You will also need a thorough understanding of the enemy you are facing including weapons, generals, and army size. With this knowledge, you will need to formulate a defense and fortification strategy for what will surely be an attempt by the British to seize the same peninsula. You will then present all your findings through notes, maps, and a visual diagram of your fortification plan to your commanding officers. Good luck! Title Flickr: Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the BPL’s photostream
  4. 4. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] <ul><li>It is now June of 1775. Your commanders are telling you the time is now. They have already set the date for the fortification of the Charleston Peninsula for the night of June 16 th . Surely fear and doubts are common in such a difficult time as this. </li></ul><ul><li>Take courage, however, as you read the quotes of the legendary George Washington , who has been placed in charge of all American troops. </li></ul><ul><li>There is also great strength in numbers. Choose three other war strategists from among your peers to form a group of four because four heads are better than one, but you have to work well with them, listening to their advice and offering your own. </li></ul><ul><li>Perhaps something else to keep you motivated is to remind yourself exactly why you are fighting in the first place. </li></ul><ul><li>Also it is a great idea to really know the men you will be following, General Artemas Ward and General Israel Putnam </li></ul><ul><li>Now that you have some inspiration, it is time to get down to business. Make sure you are making detailed notes as you go. You will turn these in to your general along with your actual plan of defense. </li></ul><ul><li>Study up on the strategic minds you will be battling against, General Thomas Gage , the British commander in chief and the man most likely to lead an attack against your position on Charleston Peninsula, Major General William Howe </li></ul><ul><li>You will also most definitely need to survey the land to strategize exactly how you would build up defense of such a key location. I would recommend observing s ome of the many maps associated with the area . It is also crucial as you plan to consider the topography of the land, that is, the highs and lows to better your defensive strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Time is running out. You have the information you need. In your groups, make a map of the area which you intend to defend. It needs to be large enough where you can lay it down with fake soldiers and go over the plan with your commanding officers. It also has to be detailed and accurate enough where your supervisors know exactly what the plan is. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Your generals are looking for the following from you and will grade your performance based upon these three criteria. Flickr: Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the BPL’s photostream
  6. 6. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Exemplary 4 Accomplished 3 Developing 2 Beginning 1 Score Quality of Work Provides work of the highest quality. Provides high quality work. Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality. Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality. Monitors Group Effectiveness Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group, and makes suggestions to make it more effective. Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective. Occasionally monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective. Rarely monitors the effectiveness of the group and does not work to make it more effective. Working with Others Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together. Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause &quot;waves&quot; in the group. Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member. Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player. Attitude Never is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Always has a positive attitude about the task(s). Rarely is publicly critical of the project or the work of others. Often has a positive attitude about the task(s). Occasionally is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Usually has a positive attitude about the task(s). Often is publicly critical of the project or the work of other members of the group. Often has a negative attitude about the task(s). Quality of Notes Notes are well written with no or very few errors Notes are well written with few errors. Notes contain quite a few errors, but the quality overall is still fairly good. Notes are not well written, containing many errors. Insightfulness of Notes Notes are very insightful, containing a great number of important facts about historical figures and places. Notes are insightful with many facts about historical figures and places. Notes are well written, however, the student may not have chosen the most approporiate facts or not that many facts overall. Notes are few and most do not convey much insight into specific historical figures and places.
  7. 7. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Beginning 1 Developing 2 Accomplished 3 Exemplary 4 Score Required Elements Storyboard included all required elements as well as a few additional elements. Storyboard included all required elements and one additional element. Storyboard included all required elements. One or more required elements was missing from the storyboard. Exemplary 4 Accomplished 3 Developing 2 Beginning 1 Score Title Title tells the purpose/content of the map, is clearly distinguishable as the title (e.g. larger letters, underlined, etc), and is printed at the top of the map. Title tells the purpose/content of the map and is printed at the top of the map. Title tells the purpose/content of the map, but is not located at the top of the map. Purpose/content of the map is not clear from the title. Neatness of Color and Lines All straight lines are ruler-drawn, all errors have been neatly corrected and all features are colored completely. All straight lines are ruler-drawn, most errors have been neatly corrected and most features are colored completely. Most straight lines are ruler-drawn, most errors have been neatly corrected and most features are colored completely. Many lines, corrections of errors, and/or features are not neatly done. Spelling / Capitalization 95-100% of words on the map are spelled and capitalized correctly. 94-85% of the words on the map are spelled and capitalized correctly. 84-75% of the words on the map are spelled and capitalized correctly. Less than 75% of the words on the map are spelled and/or capitalized correctly. Labels - Accuracy At least 90% of the items are labeled and located correctly. 80-89% of the items are labeled and located correctly. 79-70% of the items are labeled and located correctly. Less than 70% of the items are labeled and located correctly. Knowledge Gained Student shows a clear understanding of battle strategy, utilizing natural boundaries such as seas and high plains. Student shows a general understanding of battle strategies, utilizing for the most part, natural boundaries such as seas and high plains. Student shows signs of understanding battle strategy. Though he or she may not fully utilize the natural boundaries such as seas and plains, he or she does show some move towards this. The student does not show signs of understanding battle strategy. He or she does not utilize natural boundaries such as seas and plains.
  8. 8. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Back to Evaluation Rubistar Exemplary 4 Accomplished 3 Developing 2 Beginning 1 Score Required Elements Storyboard included all required elements as well as a few additional elements. Storyboard included all required elements and one additional element. Storyboard included all required elements. One or more required elements was missing from the storyboard. Content All content is in the students' own words and is accurate. Almost all content is in the students' own words and is accurate. At least half of the content is in the students' own words and is accurate. Less than half of the content is in the students' own words and/or is accurate. Comprehension Student shows complete comprehension of all aspects of military strategy in planning Student shows very good comprehension of most aspects of military strategy in planning Students displays basic knowledge of military strategy in presenting different aspects of it Student shows very little comprehension of military strategy in terms of designing a battle plan Presentation Student utilizes effective visual tools to demonstrate battle strategy Student shows battle strategy clearly, but perhaps not using the most effective of tools Understanding of battle strategy is a little hard to comprehend as some tools and other explanations do not make perfect sense Student does not show battle strategy clearly, choosing ineffective tools and a description difficult to understand
  9. 9. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Whew, that was a lot of work. It is time to show off your skills to your commanding officers and not a minute too soon. Tomorrow night, June 16 th 1775, they plan to move into position utilizing what you are about to show off. You have all your notes in place and your map detailed out to show exactly the strategy you hope to implement. Your generals will go over all this with you and will give the orders to begin moving men and supplies into position. Thank you for your hard work; only time will tell whether or not victory shall be yours. To learn how the real battle went, feel free to read all about it here . Great job you military strategist you. You have done what will be your country a great service to which it can never express its gratitude. Flickr: Boston Public Library
  10. 10. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Photos Used: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ooocha/2590786341/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/normanbleventhalmapcenter/2674891313/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/normanbleventhalmapcenter/2674266417/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/storm-crypt/1437896007/ Other Books Used: Symonds, Craig L. A Battlefield Atlas of the American Revolution . The Nautical and Aviation Company of America, Inc., 1986. Like what you’ve seen? Here’s how we did it… The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group
  11. 11. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 8th Grade U.S. History Designed by Joel Grove [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Flickr: Storm Crypt
  12. 12. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed to complement the eighth grade social studies text book The American Journey. The lesson is intended to teach students about the Revolutionary War with an emphasis on the people and places involved in the war and the battle strategy that goes into planning for revolution. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  13. 13. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is targeted most to involve eighth grade social studies students but would also assist 6 th , 7 th , and 9 th graders and even beyond perhaps. Besides social studies, to a lesser extent, the lesson includes aspects of language arts and arts and humanities. Prior to beginning the lesson, students need a brief overview of the Revolutionary War, why war was declared, the events leading up to war, and significant battles that have taken place prior to the battle of Bunker Hill. Students will need to know where troops from both sides are located, how many troops are available, and what the rations and supply count looks like. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  14. 14. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Social Studies Standards Addressed </li></ul><ul><li>chronologically organizing major events and people of United States history. </li></ul><ul><li>describing significant events and people which form the foundation of United States history in the chronological context of the history of the Americas and the world. </li></ul><ul><li>interpreting historical data to determine cause-effect and time-order relationships </li></ul><ul><li>gathering information from multiple sources, including electronic databases, to </li></ul><ul><li>understand events from multiple perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>interpreting the data in historical maps, photographs, art works, and other artifacts </li></ul><ul><li>explaining the historical development of democratic governmental principles and </li></ul><ul><li>institutions </li></ul><ul><li>This lesson also encourages a number of thinking and communication skills. Students must think critically to interpret data and create a defensive plan with this information. The plan will involve aspects of creative production and problem-solving in the mapping and battle ground formation of the battle itself. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  15. 15. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Click here to see student process slide . Additional details that a teacher might need are included below. Because it is a group project, the lesson will take more than one class period. Depending upon the student’s levels of learning, about one week will be standard for accomplishing the assignment, utilizing time in class to work together in the groups to accomplish it. Students will be split into groups by appropriate levels of comprehension according to other work that has been accomplished throughout the semester. For example, students with higher grades will be grouped up with those with lower to help each other out. The teacher should try to get an artist and a more natural leader in each group as well. Potential problems include not having enough artists or leaders and also when students are asked to work together, problems are always able to come up simply because people can be hard to work with. No former skills are required for the teacher to lead this lesson. Variations One week may not be enough to finish the project in which case students will be more than equipped to meet outside of school to finish the project. It is essential, however, that enough time be spent in the classroom itself for students to raise questions that will most definitely come up. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  16. 16. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page <ul><li>Here are some recommended materials to help implement the lesson into the classroom: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Class sets of books </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E-mail accounts for all students (to contact outside of class if needed) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There are also a number of websites you will need to utilize for the students to research the necessary information. These websites are included below. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.revolutionary-war-and-beyond.com/revolutionary-war-quotes.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.harlingen.isd.tenet.edu/coakhist/amrev.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/ARTEMAS+WARD </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.connecticutsar.org/patriots/putnam_israel.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.americanrevolution.com/ThomasGage.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://browser.grik.net/www.americanrevolution.com/WilliamHowe.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://dcn.davis.ca.us/vme/vo/4.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/maps/bunkerhill/enlargement.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://maps.yahoo.com/mapmixer?lid=e224088e&pg=view </li></ul><ul><li>http://books.google.com/books?id=3vA89neVsEcC&pg=PA130&lpg=PA130&dq=why+breed%27s+hill+versus+bunker+hill&source=web&ots=SSaA6NQSjv&sig=MuLFLkbMeGOVdw2adZbN9gMl8qg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=3&ct=result </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.britishbattles.com/bunker-hill.htm </li></ul><ul><li>One teacher is able to put on the lesson, however, this could be a great event to incorporate some parental help in the classroom, allowing parents to come in and volunteer in researching and strategizing with their children. </li></ul>Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  17. 17. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page To determine whether or not the lesson was successful, there are three evaluations that you will be looking at. The first will take a look at how well the students worked together in groups and also the quality of notes taken on the historical figures and places. The second evaluation will look at the map itself, how neat it was presented, how accurate it is, etc. Finally students will be evaluated on how well they are able to explain their specific battle strategy. To see the actual student evaluations, click here and scroll through the different grading rubrics. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  18. 18. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Having given the students a background of the Revolutionary War as was mentioned in the Learners Section of the Teacher Pages, it is time to present the project to the students. The following is a sample script to be used as you go through the student slides with the students. Introduction: “Now that we have some understanding of what the Revolutionary War was and how it started, we are going to take a look at a specific battle. How many of you have heard of the Battle of Bunker Hill? (look for hands raised) Good, that’s great. How many of you fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill? (anticipate some funny students raising their hands and be equipped with a witty come back like “wow, you look great for being more than 200 years old.”) Well today you are going to imagine that you are living in the time right before this very battle. (Click to reveal the first slide) “Although you should know yourself pretty well, let’s still refresh ourselves about our thoughts and feelings. (Click for the student introduction and read together) (This part shouldn’t take real long and there shouldn’t be too many questions. The Task: “Now that we know a little more about ourselves, let’s see exactly what we are going to do to contribute to history. (Click to go to the task slide and read together. Anticipate a lot of questions for this section. You should have a more in depth knowledge of such historical figures mentioned like Artemas Ward and Israel Putnam because questions about them could likely come up. You should also have a map ready to show the area mentioned as well as a pretty thorough understanding of the geography and actual battle) The Process: “You won’t be able to do this alone, so how about we find some fellow comrades so you can all help each other out.” (Break class into groups of four as noted in the teacher process section) (The rest of the process is mostly self explanatory, however, it will still take a significant amount of time for the students to get through.) “Before I let you out on your own to start going through this, let’s jump ahead to see what you as a group and individually are going to be evaluated on.” (Go through the rubrics with them. This shouldn’t take too long, but anticipate some clarification on exactly what students will be evaluated on.) “All right, we’re about to get going. Are there any more question?” (Don’t anticipate too many because hopefully questions have been being answered along the way) “Well then, let’s go back to our process and get started!” (Click back to the process slide. Allow them to go through the slide, clicking on the links and taking notes as a group. Be available and prepared to answer questions and to assist in what will most likely be clarification of tasks and/or what are important notes. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion To the teacher process page
  19. 19. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page History will always be one of two things. For many it will be that boring subject where the teacher babbled on about a bunch of random and useless facts and dates that never will hold any significance to the teacher. This is a sad truth, but unfortunately, it is what many in the study of history especially at the middle school and high school levels experience. However, there is another way to go. Students can come away with an understanding of the true depth and relevance of history, how it affects our every day lives and how it has brought us to where we are today. To do this, the teacher must be enthusiastic and must present the material in such a way as to engage the student into interactive methods of learning. This is exactly what we hope to accomplish through this assignment. Many students will learn of the Revolutionary War and the Battle of Bunker Hill simply by a teacher telling the students about the battle. Here is a great chance to engage the student in the actual battle strategizing process. Allow students to research the time period on their own, choosing themselves which are relevant facts. Let them see the actual land forms and troop placements. Let them put themselves in the shoes of the colonists, deciding what the best defense is. This is where I believe true learning will be achieved. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  20. 20. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Photos Used: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ooocha/2590786341/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/normanbleventhalmapcenter/2674891313/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/normanbleventhalmapcenter/2674266417/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/storm-crypt/1437896007/ Other Books Used: Symonds, Craig L. A Battlefield Atlas of the American Revolution . The Nautical and Aviation Company of America, Inc., 1986. Like what you’ve seen? Here’s how we did it… The WebQuest Page The WebQuest Slideshare Group Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
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