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Chapter 6 section 1 (views of earth)

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Chapter 6 Section 1: Landforms …

Chapter 6 Section 1: Landforms


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    • 1. Chapter 6: Views of EarthSection 1: Lanforms
      Mr. MotukGeneral Science
    • 2.
    • 3. Chapter 6 Section 1
      I. Views of Earth
      Landforms
      A landform is a general feature of Earth’s surface.
      3 Basic Landforms
      Plains: Large, relatively flat areas.
      Plateaus: Relatively flat, raised areas.
      Mountains: Elevated surface features.
    • 4.
    • 5. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Plateaus
      A plateau is a raised relatively flat area of land.
      Composed of horizontal bedrock uplifted by natural forces.
      Characterized by high, vertical cliff boarders.
      Example: Colorado Plateau
      Most famous is the Grand Canyon
    • 6. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Plains
      Plains are divided into two types.
      Coastal Plains:
      Broad areas along the oceans shore
      Sometimes called lowlands due to minimal elevation.
      Characterized by rolling hills, swamps, and marshes.
      Interior Plains
      Land locked, relatively flat, lowland areas.
      With thick fertile soil, plains are ideal for farming
      Usually between mountains and ranges.
    • 7. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Mountains
      Mountains rise high above the surrounding land.
      Mt. Everest is the highest mountain peak (in the Himalayan Mountains), 8,800 meters above sea level. (29,029 ft)
      Four main ways that mountains form:
      Folding
      Upwarping
      Fault Block
      Volcanic Activity
    • 8. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Folded Mountains
      Formed by extreme opposing horizontal pressure.
      Like squeezing a pimple!!!
      Layers buckle and fold.
      Example: Appalachian Mountains
      Formed 300 to 250 million years ago.
      Oldest and longest mountain range in North America.
      Originally higher than the Rocky Mountains.
      Weathering and Erosion have reduced the height.
      Minersville: 1184 ft (yes we are in the Appalachian Mountain range!)
    • 9. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Folded Mountains
    • 10. Appalachian Mountains
    • 11. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Up-warped Mountains
      Form by extreme upward forces.
      Erode exposing igneous and metamorphic bedrock.
      Characterized by sharp peaks and ridges.
      Examples
      Southern Rocky Mountains
      Black Hills (South Dakota)
      Adirondack Mountains (New York)
    • 12. Chapter 5 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Upwarped Mountains
    • 13. Chapter 5 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Fault Block Mountains
      Tilted faults slide diagonally in opposing directions.
      Fault: A fracture in the continuity of a rock formation caused by a shifting or dislodging of the earth's crust, in which adjacent surfaces are displaced relative to one another and parallel to the plane of fracture. Also called shift.
      Characterized by jagged peaks.
      Examples
      Grand Tetons (Wyoming)
      Sierra Nevada Mountains (California)
    • 14. Chapter 5 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Fault Block Mountains
    • 15. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      Volcanic Mountains
      Lava flows and produces a massive cone of igneous rock.
      Examples
      Mount St. Helens (Washington State)
      Mauna Loa (Hawaii)
    • 16. Chapter 6 Section 1
      Types of Mountains
      United States Elevations
      Highest Continental U.S
      Mount Whitney, California (14,494 ft)
      Highest U.S
      Mt. McKinley, Alaska (20,320 ft)
      Lowest Elevations
      Death Valley , California (282 ft below sea level)
      New Orleans, Louisiana (64 ft below sea level)
      Highest Pennsylvania Point: Mt. Davis (3,213 ft)
      Lowest World Elevation: Dead Sea (1,349 ft below sea level)