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BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011
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BCMI Presentation. Arnolfini, 2011

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  • Discuss my project…composition/sound design… software programming/problem solving… assistive technology
  • A and b quite well developed. A - proved in neruosicne B- proven in bio medical engineering C - what we’re interested in
  • … systems are primarily controlled with gestural devices… I.e. some physical movement is needed. Meets the need of many users who cannot normally make music BUT access is problematic to those with severe or complex physical conditions… such as spinal cord injury, severe brain injury or locked in syndrome where gestural devices are no good
  • Main part of my project has been mapping of data to musical values to create a system where instant aural and visual feedback can be achieved Video!!
  • Transcript

    • 1. A Brain-Computer Music Interface From Basic Research to the Real World of Special Needs and Creative Musical Performance NeuroSymphonics
    • 2. Summary
      • Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI) technology has the potential to enable active participation in music-making activities for recreational and therapeutic purposes
      • Despite recent advances of BCI technology for music, this technology has seldom been trialed with the sector of the population that really needs it
      • The time is ripe to trial such technology in the real world of special needs
    • 3. Structure of this talk
      • What is BCI?
      • Basic background: the electroencephalogram (EEG)
      • Approaches to BCI
      • Brain-Computer Music Interfacing (BCMI) research
      • The SSVEP approach
    • 4. What is BCI?
      • A brain-computer interface allows a person to control electronic devices by means of commands expressed by signals read directly from the brain
      • Currently the most viable and practical method of scanning brain signals for BCI purposes is the electroencephalogram (EGG) with electrodes placed on the scalp
    • 5. The electroencephalogram (EEG)
      • Is the study of electrical current in the brain
      • Neural activity generates
      • electric fields that can be
      • detected with electrodes
    • 6. The electroencephalogram (EEG)
      • Is the study of electrical current in the brain
      • Neural activity generates
      • electric fields that can be
      • detected with electrodes
    • 7. EEG
    • 8. EEG
    • 9. EEG
    • 10. EEG
      • The EEG expresses the overall activity of millions of neurons in the brain in terms of charge movement
      • The EEG is extremely faint, with amplitudes in the order of only a few micro volts
      • The signal has to be
      • amplified significantly and
      • scrutinized by means of
      • signal processing
      • techniques to be handled
      • by a BCI system
    • 11. EEG
      • The EEG expresses the overall activity of millions of neurons in the brain in terms of charge movement
      • The EEG is extremely faint, with amplitudes in the order of only a few microvolts
      • The signal has to be
      • amplified significantly and
      • scrutinized by means of
      • signal processing
      • techniques to be handled
      • by a BCI system
      Meninges, skull, scalp
    • 12. BCI Research
      • It is assumed that…
      • There is information in the EEG that corresponds to different cognitive tasks
      • This information can be detected
      • People can be trained to produce EEG with such information voluntarily
    • 13. Approaches to BCI
      • Detection of EEG activity
    • 14. Approaches to BCI
      • Non-invasive
    • 15. Approaches to BCI
      • Invasive
    • 16. Approaches to control
      • 1 - Computer-Orientated Systems (or “Biofeedback Approach”)
      • With computer-orientated BCI systems, the user adapts to the computer.
      • These systems rely on the capacity of the subject to learn to control aspects
      • of the EEG (by means of ‘bio-feedback’), affording them the ability to learn
      • how to produce EEG patterns to exert some control over the system
      • 2 - User-Orientated Systems (or “Machine Learning Approach”)
      • In user-orientated BCI systems the computer adapts to the user.
      • Metaphorically speaking, these systems attempt to “read” the mind of a user
      • to control a device
      • 3 - Hybrid Approach
      • Kubler, A and Muller, K-R (2007). An Introduction to BCI. In Toward Brain Computer
      • Interfacing. MIT
    • 17. Brain Computer Music Interface Research
      • Overarching aim:
      • To develop musical BCI technology to allow control of musical parameters akin to
      • those used in modern musical performance
      • Motivation:
      • The extremely limited opportunities for active participation in music making
      • available for people with severe physical disabilities, despite advances in
      • technology.
      • At present there are a number of sophisticated systems available for
      • recreational music making and music therapy for those with severe physical
      • disabilities.
      • However…..
    • 18. Approaches to using EEG to make Music
      • 1. Sonification of EEG
      • Display of the EEG sonically as well as visually. Largely passive in
      • the sense that the subject does not explicitly control the sound
      • 2. Musification of EEG
      • EEG signal is mapped onto the parameters of a musical system to
      • generate music. Again, largely passive because subject cannot
      • control music consistently
      • 3. Music control with EEG
      • The EEG signal is used to control a musical system
    • 19. Challenges of the 3rd approach
      • The extraction of meaningful information from brain signals
      • The design of computer music systems that responds to such information to generate sounds/music
      • The definition of ways in which such technology can effectively improve the lives of people with special needs and address therapeutic needs
    • 20. Very brief survey of past works
      • As early as 1934 a paper in Brain reported on a method to listen to the EEG [1]
      • Mid ‘60s. Alvin Lucier composed Music for a Solo Performer
      • Early 70’s David Rosenboom began systematic research into the potential of EEG to generate music
    • 21. Towards real world applications : SSVEP
      • Repetitive visual stimuli (RVS) elicit Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEPs) in the EEG
      • SSVEP enables a subject to select commands
      • User selects a command by focusing their attention on one of the RSVs (flashing icons on a screen)
    • 22. How does it work?
    • 23.  
    • 24.  
    • 25.  
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    • 28.  
    • 29.  
    • 30. Out of the Lab
    • 31. Patient ‘M’
    • 32. “… just thought I’d drop you a quick email to say that I really enjoyed the experiment…it was great to be in control again”
    • 33. Where next?
    • 34. Where next?
    • 35. Where next?

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