Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Introduction To Agile And Scrum Innotech

3,091

Published on

Brief Introduction to Agile and SCRUM. This was presented at the InnoTech conference in OKC on November 4th, 2009.

Brief Introduction to Agile and SCRUM. This was presented at the InnoTech conference in OKC on November 4th, 2009.

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,091
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
100
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Agile and SCRUM<br />Joe Vallone<br />Dir. Engineering/IT<br />Telogical Systems<br />
  • 2. My Background<br />Over 20 years of Software Development and project management experience<br />Certified SCRUM master (twice)<br />Implemented SCRUM in multiple teams at two different companies<br />Previous opponent now proponent<br />
  • 3. Telogical Systems<br />Provides competitive pricing information to telecom and cable industries<br />Vast number of products and services that range from internet, telephone, and television offers<br />Products and services often bundled as packages or offered as promotions<br />Price and availability varies by location<br />Information constantly changing<br />
  • 4. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Business / Technology Drivers<br />Business<br />Increase Revenue; Decrease Cost; Higher Production<br />Faster speed-to-value<br />Improved ROI<br />Predictability<br />Increased opportunity<br />Flexibility<br />Technology<br />Sustainable Pace<br />Collaborative Development<br />Opportunities to creatively solve problems<br />Work with latest tools, languages, platforms<br />Recognition and Respect<br />
  • 5. Agile Terminology<br />Agile is an umbrella term<br />Includes SCRUM, XP, Crystal, FDD, etc.<br /> Agile values and practices that encourage rapid and flexible response to change<br />Scrum<br />One of the agile development methods<br />Agile project management framework<br />Agile Software Development<br /> Business/User Value-driven<br />Time-boxed<br /> Iterative<br /> Incremental <br />
  • 6. Values of Agile Development<br />Processes and tools<br />Comprehensive documentation<br />Contract negotiation<br />Following a plan<br />Individuals and interactions<br />Working software<br />Customer collaboration<br />Responding to change<br />Agile Manifesto 2001, www.agilealliance.org<br />© Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />
  • 7. What is SCRUM?<br />Name refers to a Rugby Scrum where adaptive team behavior moves a ball up the field toward a common goal<br />A set of project management values and practices that cut through complexity to focus on building software with high business value<br />© Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />
  • 8. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />What is Scrum?<br />An Agile Project Management framework :<br />A team-based approach <br />Handles conflicting interests and needs<br />Improves communications and maximizes cooperation <br />Early detection and removal of obstacles <br />Maximizes productivity<br />Multiple, frequent feature-driven planning activities <br />Produces potentially shippable functionality at each iteration<br />Scalable<br />Improves morale<br />Disciplined approach<br />Truth, Transparency, and Commitment<br />
  • 9. Waterfall Model – The bad Old’ Days<br />Requirements<br />Design<br />Implementation<br />Verification<br />Maintenance<br />
  • 10. Differences Between SCRUM and Waterfall<br />With the Waterfall Methodology<br />Has a specific sequence of events<br />Requirements, Analysis, Design, Coding, Testing, Maintenance<br />Requirements and Iterations can not be easily changed<br />Big Design Up Front<br />Clients may want major changes made after a prototype is seen.<br /> Time and energy may have been wasted at this stage<br />
  • 11. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2007-2009<br />Key Scrum Roles and Responsibilities<br /><ul><li>Defines the features of the product, decides on release date and content
  • 12. Is responsible for the profitability/value of the product (ROI)
  • 13. Prioritizes features according to market and/or user value
  • 14. Can change features and priority every 30 days
  • 15. Accepts or rejects work results</li></ul>Product Owner<br /><ul><li>Ensures that the team is fully functional and productive
  • 16. Enables close cooperation across all roles and functions and removes barriers
  • 17. Shields the team from external interferences
  • 18. Ensures that the process is followed. Invites to daily scrum, iteration review and planning meetings</li></ul>ScrumMaster<br /><ul><li>Cross-functional, seven plus/minus two members
  • 19. Selects the iteration goal and specifies work results
  • 20. Has the right to do everything within the boundaries of the project guidelines to reach the iteration goal
  • 21. Organizes itself and its work
  • 22. Demos work results to the end-user and stakeholders</li></ul>Team<br />
  • 23. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Release Management<br />Product Owner determines when a release is needed, what functionality it must contain, and what is an acceptable level of quality and cost<br />Product Owner works with Scrum Teams to determine how long it takes to build the release<br />Development creates preliminary estimates<br />Development refines the estimates as priority increases<br />Development selects the product backlog for development, each Sprint<br />Product Owner focuses on business value derived from each iteration and then the release<br />
  • 24. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Chickens and Pigs<br />A chicken and a pig are together when the chicken says, &amp;quot;Let&amp;apos;s start a restaurant!“<br /> The pig thinks it over and says, &amp;quot;What would we call this restaurant?“<br />The chicken says, &amp;quot;Ham n&amp;apos; Eggs!&amp;quot;<br />The pig says, &amp;quot;No thanks. I&amp;apos;d be committed, but you&amp;apos;d only be involved!&amp;quot;<br />
  • 25. Chickens and Pigs<br />Each Scrum Team meets daily for a 15-minute status meeting called the Daily Scrum. <br />The team members who can speak are &amp;apos;pigs.&amp;apos;  Other participants may attend but they should not speak (much) in daily Scrum meetings.  These people are called &amp;apos;chickens.‘ <br />The terms &amp;apos;chickens&amp;apos; and &amp;apos;pigs&amp;apos; comes from the statement: &amp;quot;In a ham-and-eggs restaurant, the pig is committed but the chicken is simply involved.&amp;quot; <br />
  • 26. Primary Goal of Scrum<br />Iteration “Sprint” (time-box)<br />(2-4 weeks)<br />“DONE”<br />© Agile Infusion, LLC 2007-2008<br />
  • 27. SP Multimedia Communications roadmap / JR<br />
  • 28. Scrum Workflow<br />Key Practices<br />Self-directed; self-organizing teams (preferably co-located)<br /> Iterative Adaptive planning <br /> Stakeholder/Customer Involvement<br /> 30-calendar day iterations<br /> 15 minute daily stand-up meeting <br />Team measures progress daily<br /> Each iteration delivers tested, fully-functional software for demonstration<br /> Always 30-days from potential production release<br /> Sprint Retrospective Process<br />Create a rhythm and flow<br />Obstacles Removed<br />Sprint Planning<br />Sprint Review<br />Release Backlog<br />Planning /Retrospective<br />Product Roadmap<br />Business Goals<br />© Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />
  • 29. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />The Product Backlog <br />High<br />value<br /> Each Sprint implements the <br /> highest value features<br /><ul><li>All possible system features are captured in a prioritized list – the Product Backlog
  • 30. New features can be added at any time to the Product Backlog by anyone
  • 31. Features have only a gross estimate of effort and value
  • 32. Product Owner prioritizes the Product Backlog</li></ul>Each new feature is<br />prioritized and added to <br />the stack<br />Features may be<br />reprioritized at any time<br />Features may be<br />removed at any time<br />Low<br />value<br />Features<br />© 2004, Scott W. Ambler<br />
  • 33. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Backlog Items<br />User Stories<br />As a &amp;lt;actor&amp;gt;, I would like to &amp;lt;action&amp;gt;, so that &amp;lt;value&amp;gt;<br />Attributes<br />Size (points) – Relative Size<br />Value ($, H/M/L) – Business value<br /> Functional area, etc.<br />Conditions of Satisfaction<br />
  • 34. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Estimation<br />Agile approach to estimation<br />Separate estimates of size from estimates of duration<br />Estimates ≠ Commitment<br />Don’t spend too much time…it doesn’t get better<br />Estimate Size; Derive Duration<br />Story Points<br />Velocity<br />Techniques<br />Compare<br />Triangulate<br />Break into Smaller Pieces<br />Use Planning Poker<br />
  • 35. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Team Sprint Capacity and Velocity<br />How does team get to commitment?<br />Capacity Planning<br />Vacations, Holidays, etc<br />Project time commitments<br />Productive hours/day<br />Other commitments<br />Velocity<br />What is the rate at which we convert backlog items to “done” increments<br />History, Lessons Learned, Risks, Capacity, Skills, Environment, Tools<br />Explicit Personal and Team Commitment<br />
  • 36. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Architecture and Scrum<br />Architecture and infrastructure work<br />High value non-functional requirements <br />Demonstrate ability to support features<br />Every Sprint must deliver at least some piece of business functionality<br />To prove that architecture or infrastructure works<br />To prove to customer that work they value is taking place<br />
  • 37. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />The Daily Scrum<br />Scrum Master Coordinates<br />Same place, same time daily<br />Preferably at task board<br />Scrum Team Members<br />One person speaks; others listen<br />“Since the last daily Scrum I completed..”<br />“Today I am going to work on…”<br />“The obstacle in my way is…”<br />Update work remaining on tasks for burndown<br />Not a problem-solving or design session<br />Scrum Master reports on obstacles<br />Chickens invited to listen and observe<br />
  • 38. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />The Sprint Burndown Chart<br />We Track<br />Work Remaining<br />
  • 39. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />New Business Driver<br />Customer<br />Priorities<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Priorities<br />Priorities<br />Integrated Testing<br />Architecture<br />Quality<br />Deliverable<br />Product<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />Customer<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />30 Day<br />Sprint<br />Release<br />100% Tested<br />What it looks like in action<br />Release Planning<br />Priorities<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Planned<br />Sprint<br />Priorities<br />Priorities<br />Priorities<br />© Gestalt-LLC<br />
  • 40. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Project Reporting<br />Artifacts<br />Product, Release, Sprint Backlogs<br />Obstacles (Risks and Issues Report)<br />Burndown Charts/Data (Product, Release, Sprint)<br />Levels of Testing (Unit, Functional, User, Performance)<br />Quality metrics (defects, tests, builds)<br />Transparency<br />Information Radiators<br />Posted in team room, public areas, project wiki<br />Should be able to quickly understand project health<br />
  • 41. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />Quality<br />Continuous Integration &amp; Testing<br />Strive to get continuous builds<br />Full testing of each increment at every level possible<br />Automate, Automate, Automate!!<br />Defect Management<br />Maintain high quality through each sprint<br />Do not build the “bug mountain”<br />Log all issues from start of project that do not get closed by end-of-day<br />Traceability<br />From Vision to Goals to Features to Backlog to Tasks<br />Maintainability<br />Quality designs, Simplicity, Fully automated Unit to Systems tests<br />Usability<br />Sprint by Sprint feedback and adaptation to user’s needs<br />
  • 42. © Agile Infusion, LLC 2006-2009<br />What does it mean?<br />Significant Change to the Organization<br />You will…<br />Know where you are everyday<br />Share Responsibility and Accountability<br />Check each others work daily<br />Collaborate and work as a team<br />Identify and address issues and risks daily<br />Be completely transparent<br />This will require high levels of TRUST<br />
  • 43. To make SCRUM Successful<br />Everyone in the organization should be trained<br />CEO-&amp;gt;employees<br />Ideal team size 7 +/- 2<br />Teams become self-organized<br />Interference from Management should be limited<br />TRUST!<br />
  • 44. Scrum works because…<br />Its philosophical underpinnings focus on empowering the development team and satisfying customers. Its managerial culture is rooted in helping others achieve their goals. Its technical tools are focused on making fact-based decisions through a learning process. When all of these factors are in place, it’s hard for Scrum not to succeed. -- Mary Poppendieck<br />Lean and Agile development methodology expert from her foreword to “Agile Project Management with Scrum” by Ken Schwaber<br />
  • 45. Where can you learn more?<br />Scrum Master Certification<br />www.scrumalliance.org<br />Join Yahoo Group “Scrumdevelopment”<br />Recommended Reading<br />Agile Project Management with Scrum Schwaber<br />Agile Software Development with Scrum Schwaber<br />Scrum for the Enterprise Schwaber<br />Agile Estimation and Planning Cohn<br />Agile Retrospectives Derby/Larsen<br />Agile Testing Crispin/Gregory<br />
  • 46. Q&amp;A<br />What questions do you have?<br />

×