APA Planning Office of the Future horwedel

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Presentation at the National Planning Conference in Atlanta introducing the Planning Agency of the Future project. This project is looking at what issues planning agencies of all sizes should be considering in the next five to ten year horizon.

The project is looking at four key themes:
Demographic shifts underway
The role of technology as a disruptive tool
21st Century Problems and 20th Century Practices
Economics 101 – The Value of Planning

The project will be completed for the 2015 National Planning Conference in Seattle and has a MindMixer site to collect input at

What are the key trends and issues that are affecting the Planning Office of the Future?
Given those trends and issues, what should the Planning Office of the Future be? We asked two questions at the session:
What are the key trends and issues that are affecting the Planning Office of the Future?
Given those trends and issues, what should the Planning Office of the Future be?

Share your ideas at NPC or online at the MindMixer Site for project at http://apa.mindmixer.com/

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  • Generation Y Characteristics
    2013/03/31 By Ryan Gibson 5 Comments
    Generation Y refers to the specific generation born between the 1980’s to the early 1990’s and was the term given to this Generation after proceeding Generation X. But what key characteristics define this generation? Like everything with this generation there is much debate as to the main characteristics to define a whole generation. One would say it’s impossible. However as a demographic generation y is the fastest growing generation in business and business leaders, hr advisors and team managers alike all want to know how to nurture this talent.
    Love them or hate them this generation is here to stay and will continue to make ground roads within business. Here are some of the main characteristics to define Generation Y. Get to know them well as they will someday be heading up the businesses we are all part of.
    Tech/Web Savvy:
    I’ll send you an email’. Generation Y were born into an emerging world of technology and have grown up surrounded by smart phones, laptops, tablets and other gadgets. As a generation people are constantly plugged into technology and it becomes an essential aspect of the generations life.
    Generation Y prefer to communicate more quickly and effectively via email, social networks or text messaging as opposed to traditional means of communication. The generation are also attracted to organisations where technology is are the forefront of the companies ethos. Traditional companies are less of an attraction for the millennial generation . Generation Y want to work for companies who are embracing these new means of communication and implementing them into business as opposed to organisations with a more traditional mind set. Technology needs to be part of this generations day to day life. As yourself the question ‘How many 20 somethings do you see without a smartphone?’
    Family Orientated:
    The way one see’s the workplace is entirely different when it comes to Generation Y. Instead of working long shifts to work their way up an organisation the millennial generation prefer flexible working schedules and a more rounded work/life balance. Don’t confuse the generation as lazy. Far from it however family life takes priority over the work place. Many Generation Y’s have grown up with overworked parents and this has driven the new perception to work. The older generation may see this as a commitment issue however the millennial’s merely view life differently and want to find the best blend of an enjoyable life with a fulfilling working environment.
    Ambitious:
    Generation Y are confident and ambitious. Expectations typically need to be managed as Generation Y’s are confident to take on important roles within organisations as soon as they begin. With young entrepreneurs like Mark Zuckerburg the millennials believe theres no limit to what they can achieve. As an organisation the difficulty is managing these expectations without stifling creativity and development. Giving Generation Y’s the resources they require to see development is a strategic way businesses look to keep the generation happy. Generation Y have high expectations of their employees and expect this to be matched. Many are not afraid to seek employment elsewhere if this ambition is not met. Unlike generations before them they are happy to change job roles more often to find the right organisation to work within.
    Team Players:
    Teamwork is high on the agenda of Generation Y. Working as a team is high on the agenda and regular team meetings and collaboration with colleagues is preferred. Generation Y wants to be involved and included. They expect openness and transparency from management and colleagues and seek for this team playing mentality within an organisation.
    Communicators:
    Communication is key for Generation Y however it has to be on the right terms. Sending a Generation Y an email, a tweet or a Facebook message will receive an instant reply whereas a phone call may take a little longer for a return. Within the office environment Generation Y’s prefer communication via email whereas the baby boomer generation prefer to pick up the phone. Communication which is quick, effective and on Generation Y terms will be conducted in a heartbeat.
    Like to be loved:
    Constant feedback, gratitude, relaying to someone they are doing a good job are common characteristics of Generation Y. In generations before this level of communication was unheard of with senior management however Generation Y in the workplace seek this level of love. Companies have began to implement mentor schemes to develop and guide the young generation in their careers. Having this level of guidance and reassurance is essential when working with and nurturing this generation.
  • APA Planning Office of the Future horwedel

    1. 1. Planning Office of the Future Joseph Horwedel, AICP Lucas Lindsey Mitchell Silver, FAICP David Rouse, AICP National Planning Conference Atlanta, April 28, 2014
    2. 2. Agenda 1. Introduction (D. Rouse) 2. Key Trends (J. Horwedel) 3. The Millennial Planner’s Perspective (L. Lindsey) 4. Brainstorming the Planning Office of the Future (M. Silver) 5. Facilitated Discussion (J. Horwedel) • What are the key trends and issues that are affecting the Planning Office of the Future? • Given those trends and issues, what should the Planning Office of the Future be?
    3. 3. • Smart Cities and Sustainability • Planning for Economic Development • Consumers of Planning/Engaged Citizens • People and Places • Aging Population • Planning Office of the Future • Retired Members • Water • Emerging Issues APA President’s Task Forces
    4. 4. Planning Office of the Future Task Force: Charge • Report on planning management models for small and large jurisdictions • Examine how technology is changing management and service provision • Prepare final report for 2015 NPC in Seattle
    5. 5. Planning Office of the Future Task Force: Scope • Public planning agencies (towns, cities, counties) • 5-10 year time horizon • Framework • Internal (agency responsibilities, attributes) vs. external (role / relationship to municipal or county government, community) • The planning office of today • Key trends • The Planning Office of the Future
    6. 6. APA Divisions 20 divisions established to advance the planning practice. They give members opportunities to discuss ides, contribute to national policy work, build partnerships and develop conference sessions. $25 per year per division.
    7. 7. City Planning and Management Division Mission to “advance the practice of city planning and management in the large-city setting." • a focus upon planning agency management, • an orientation toward big cities, and • an emphasis upon the practical over the theoretical. Supports the New Planning Director Institute each year including 2 scholarships.
    8. 8. Planning Agency of the Future
    9. 9. Key Topics • Demographic shifts underway • The role of technology as a disruptive tool • 21st Century Problems and 20th Century Practices • Economics 101 – The Value of Planning
    10. 10. We know the next 30 years will be fundamentally different than the last
    11. 11. Demographic Changes in the Community and the Office Technology Savvy Family Oriented Ambitious Team Players Instant Communicators Like Acknowledgment
    12. 12. The Silver Tsunami in Government
    13. 13. How we feel about ourselves
    14. 14. Technology as a Disruptive Tool Big Data Open Data Mobile Economy Sharing Economy Maker Economy
    15. 15. 21st Century Problems and 20th Century Practices • Comp Plans • Zoning / Subdivision Regulations • Capital Improvement Plans • Community Engagement • Staff Recruitment and Development Civil Service
    16. 16. Measuring Complete Neighborhoods - Walkscore
    17. 17. The Value of Planning Be seen as the “Go to department” Be the key member of the economic team Demonstrate measurable return on investment Be the one with the solution, not the problem Bring new partners to the table Be out there knocking on doors
    18. 18. Planning Office of the Future Discussion • What are the key trends and issues that are affecting the Planning Office of the Future? • Given those trends and issues, what should the Planning Office of the Future be? Share your ideas at NPC or online at the MindMixer Site for Project http://apa.mindmixer.com/

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