Culture Builder Bootcamp: Building an Inclusive Organizational Culture
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Culture Builder Bootcamp: Building an Inclusive Organizational Culture

on

  • 5,515 views

Slides from a 6 hour workshop focused on "building an inclusive organizational culture," delivered by joe gerstandt

Slides from a 6 hour workshop focused on "building an inclusive organizational culture," delivered by joe gerstandt
@joegerstandt
joegerstandt.com

Statistics

Views

Total Views
5,515
Views on SlideShare
5,438
Embed Views
77

Actions

Likes
23
Downloads
153
Comments
4

5 Embeds 77

http://www.joegerstandt.com 38
http://mto.adventistas.org 29
https://www.linkedin.com 5
https://twitter.com 4
http://wave.webaim.org 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Culture Builder Bootcamp: Building an Inclusive Organizational Culture Culture Builder Bootcamp: Building an Inclusive Organizational Culture Presentation Transcript

  • Culture Builder Bootcamp The What, Why and How of Building an Inclusive Organizational Culture
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership what why how (measure) how (move)
  • simple self assessment • assess your organization on 9 characteristics • red = bad • yellow = fair • green = good • start thinking about a move forward plan
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • What looks like resistance is often a lack of clarity. Switch, Dan and Chip Heath
  • The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect. It means understanding that each individual is unique, and recognizing our individual differences. These can be along the dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, or other ideologies. It is the exploration of these differences in a safe, positive, and nurturing environment. It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerance to embracing and celebrating the rich dimensions of diversity contained within each individual.
  • Similarities and differences among employees in terms of age, cultural background, physical abilities and disabilities, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
  • diversity…
  • difference diversity…
  • di·ver·si·ty [dih-vur-si-tee] noun, plural –ties 1.the state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness. 2.variety; multiformity. 3.a point of difference.
  • difference relational diversity…
  • difference relational takes many forms diversity…
  • difference relational takes many forms disruptive diversity…
  • ↑diversity = ↑variance in performance groups with more diversity perform better or worse than groups with less diversity
  • identity diversity: Differences in our social identities. cognitive diversity: Differences in how we think and solve problems.
  • i d e n t i t y d i v e r s i t y
  • time for some exercise
  • 1. Circle the three aspects of your identity that have been the most central to your life experience. 2. In groups of two or 3, share how these factors have influenced you. • Your values & priorities. • How you approach work. • Your experience inside this organization and/or other organizations.
  • i d e n t i t y d i v e r s i t y
  • inclusion: The actions that we take to include additional difference in a process or group.
  • inclusion: “…being at home…” “…belonging…” “…able to bring my whole self to work…” “…feeling that my unique contribution was valued…” “…my perspective is always considered…” “…I have a say in what happens…”
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness high value in uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. high value in uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high value in uniqueness
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high value in uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success.
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high value in uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success. inclusion: Individual is treated as an insider and also allowed/encouraged to retain uniqueness within the work group.
  • low belongingness high belongingness low value in uniqueness exclusion: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider with unique value in the work group but there are other employees or groups who are insiders. assimilation: Individual is treated as an insider in the work group when they conform to org. / dominant culture norms and downplay uniqueness. high value in uniqueness differentiation: Individual is not treated as an organizational insider in the work group but their unique characteristics are seen as valuable and required for group / organization success. inclusion: Individual is treated as an insider and also allowed/encouraged to retain uniqueness within the work group.
  • self censorship playing small covering downplaying differences conforming Fear of Being Different Stifles Talent
  • •29% altered their attire, grooming or mannerisms to make their identity less obvious •40% refrained from behavior commonly associated with a given identity •57% avoided sticking up for their identity group •18% limited contact with members of a group they belong to
  • ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ??????Is it safe to be unpopular here???????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????? ????????????????????????????
  • language & logic 1.Common language. 2.Clear and concise. 3.Consistently known. (what, why & how) 4.Business case.
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • employment practices 1.Perceived fairness. 2.Perceived consistency. 3.Clear, concise. 4.Explicit. 5.Malleable.
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • orientation towards difference Is difference viewed (formally and informally) as a positive thing?
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • MT engineers @joegerstandt
  • MT management MT engineers
  • MT management MT engineers NASA management
  • MT management MT engineers NASA management
  • MT management MT engineers NASA management
  • Tuesday morning January 28th 1986
  • MT management MT engineers NASA management
  • MT management NASA management
  • g r o u p t h i n k
  • groupthink: mode of thinking that happens when the desire for harmony in a decision-making group overrides a realistic appraisal of alternatives. Group members try to minimize conflict and reach a consensus decision without critical evaluation of alternative ideas or viewpoints.
  • Minority dissent, even dissent that is wrong, stimulates divergent thought. Issues and problems are considered from more perspectives and group members find more correct answers. -Nemeth, Staw (1989) Advances in Experimental Social Psychology
  • Group vs. Individual Decision Making groups individuals accuracy speed creativity degree of acceptance efficiency
  • Group vs. Individual Decision Making groups individuals accuracy x speed x creativity x degree of acceptance x efficiency x
  • Groups often fail to outperform individuals because they prematurely move to consensus, with dissenting opinions being suppressed or dismissed. -Hackman, Morris (1975) Advances in Experimental Social Psychology
  • Group vs. Individual Decision Making groups individuals accuracy x speed x creativity x degree of acceptance x efficiency x
  • consider decision making… 1 - 10 What makes it better?
  • We simply decide without thinking much about the decision process. -Jim Nightingale
  • cognitive diversity The extent to which the group reflects differences in knowledge, including beliefs, preferences and perspectives. -Miller, et al (1998) Strategic Management Journal
  • analytical rational realistic factual logical definitive risk taker creative flexible synthesizer conceptual intuitive persistent planner organized disciplined detailed practical passionate cooperative empathetic expressive harmonizing responsive -Ned Herrmann
  • Solving technical problems Analyzing complex issues Logical approach Interpersonal aspects of situations Ice breakers Socializing in meetings Conceptualizing Innovating Seeing the big picture Routine Meetings Details Structure Expressing ideas Understanding group dynamics Team building Logic ahead of feelings No interaction with people Implementing ideas Developing plans Follow-up and completion “Blue Sky” thinking Not following the rules Joys Frustrations Joys Frustrations Joys Frustrations Joys Frustrations Cerebral Mode (abstract & intellectual thought) Limbic Mode (concrete and emotional processing) LeftMode RightMode ANALYZE ORGANIZE STRATEGIZE PERSONALIZE
  • analytical rational realistic factual logical definitive risk taker creative flexible synthesizer conceptual intuitive persistent planner organized disciplined detailed practical passionate cooperative empathetic expressive harmonizing responsive -Ned Herrmann
  • analytical rational realistic factual logical definitive risk taker creative flexible synthesizer conceptual intuitive persistent planner organized disciplined detailed practical passionate cooperative empathetic expressive harmonizing responsive potential
  • analytical rational realistic factual logical definitive risk taker creative flexible synthesizer conceptual intuitive persistent planner organized disciplined detailed practical passionate cooperative empathetic expressive harmonizing responsive tension
  • analytical rational realistic factual logical definitive risk taker creative flexible synthesizer conceptual intuitive persistent planner organized disciplined detailed practical passionate cooperative empathetic expressive harmonizing responsive -Ned Herrmann
  • what do you see?
  • please add these numbers…
  • please add these numbers… 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 =
  • please add these numbers… 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 = 55
  • please add these numbers… 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 = 55 …but how did you do it?
  • Draw a 9 dot matrix on a blank paper …
  • Draw a 9 dot matrix on a blank paper … Without lifting your pencil from the paper, draw exactly four straight, connected lines that will go through all nine dots, but through each dot only once.
  • MBA Harvard University 100 people
  • MBA Harvard University 100 people team #1
  • MBA Harvard University 100 people team #1 team #2
  • MBA Harvard University 100 people team #1 team #2
  • MBA Harvard University 100 people team #1 team #2 friends with cognitive benefits
  • These theorems that when solving problems, diversity can trump ability and that when making predictions, diversity matters just as much as ability are not political statements. They are mathematical truths. -Scott Page
  • dysfunction
  • dysfunctional disagreement dysfunctional agreement
  • also dysfunction
  • If everyone is thinking the same thing, someone isn’t thinking at all. -George S. Patton
  • dysfunctional disagreement dysfunctional agreement dysfunctional agreement
  • dysfunctional disagreement dysfunctional agreement dysfunctional agreement always disagree lack of trust personal conflict us vs. them
  • dysfunctional disagreement dysfunctional agreement dysfunctional agreement always disagree lack of trust personal conflict us vs. them always agree lack of honesty meeting after the meeting avoid conflict
  • dysfunctional disagreement dysfunctional agreement dysfunctional agreement sweet spot
  • low courage high courage low consideration passive aggressive aggressive high consideration passive assertive
  • Passive communicators: • fail to assert themselves • allow others to deliberately or inadvertently infringe on their rights • fail to express their feelings, needs, or opinions • tend to speak softly or apologetically • exhibit poor eye contact and slumped body posture
  • Aggressive communicators: • try to dominate others • use humiliation to control others • criticize, blame, or attack others • speak in a loud, demanding, and overbearing voice • do not listen well • interrupt frequently • use “you” statements
  • Passive-Aggressive communicators: • mutter to themselves rather than confront the person or issue • have difficulty acknowledging their anger • use facial expressions that don't match how they feel - i.e., smiling when angry • use sarcasm • appear cooperative while purposely doing things to annoy and disrupt • use subtle sabotage to get even
  • Assertive communicators: • state needs, feelings and wants clearly, appropriately, and respectfully • use “I” statements • listen well without interrupting • have good eye contact • speak in a calm and clear tone of voice • have a relaxed body posture • do not allow others to abuse or manipulate them
  • decision making 1.Explicit agreements. 2.Support & training. 3.Conflict management. 4.Integral to leadership / management model.
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • Does this look more familiar?!
  • consider a ten person team 1 2 4 5 9 3 876 10
  • 1 9 7 6 5 2 3 8410
  • Outcome disparities often linked to social disparities.
  • homophily: the tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others. More than 100 studies have observed homophily in some form or another establishing that similarity breeds connection. These include age, gender, class, and organizational role.
  • social network analysis From time to time people discuss important matters with other people. Looking back over the past six months, who are the people with whom you discussed matters important to you?
  • social network analysis Consider the people you communicate with in order to get your work done. Of all the people you have communicated with during the last six months, who has been the most important for getting your work done?
  • social network analysis Consider an important project or initiative that you are involved in. Consider the people who would be influential for getting it approved or obtaining the resources you need. Who would you talk to, to get the support you need?
  • social network analysis Who do you socialize with? (spending time with people after work hours, visiting one another at home, going to social events, out for meals and so on) Over the last 6 months, who are the main people with whom you have socialized informally?
  • analysis • group • proximity • expertise • hierarchy • gender • age • race • ethnicity
  • analysis • group • proximity • expertise • hierarchy • gender • age • race • ethnicity What do you have? What do you have a lot of? What do you not have? What do you need to do differently?
  • relational networks 1. Value relationships and relationship building. 2. Big, far-reaching networks. 3. Diverse networks. 4. Importance of trust building…truth. Ground vs. Hq 5. Social tools.
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • employment outcomes 1.Balanced? 2.Reflective?
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • access 1.Information. 2.Influence. 3.Change.
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • behavioral intelligence 1.Accurate understanding of human nature. 2.Variance in employee experience. 3.Authenticity.
  • stereotype waitress librarian
  • smoke bowl eat hamburgers
  • smoke bowl eat hamburgers knit wear glasses eat salad
  • It requires no hatred or fear to assign meaning to the things that we see, we do it automatically. The problem is that we forget, do not realize, or deny that this even happens.
  • volunteers?
  • pygmalion effect Based on research by Robert Rosenthal and Lenore Jacobson, showing that biased expectations affect reality and create self- fulfilling prophecies as a result.
  • confirmation bias Our tendency to search for or interpret new information in a way that confirms preconceptions and avoids information and interpretations which contradict prior beliefs.
  • fundamental attribution error An unjustified tendency to assume that a person’s actions depend on what kind of person that person is rather than on the social environmental forces influencing the person.
  • If you do not intentionally, include, you will unintentionally exclude.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying Bronnie Ware, palliative nurse
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • Top Regrets of The Dying 1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me. 2. I wish I hadn’t worked so hard. 3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings. 4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends. 5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
  • self censorship playing small covering downplaying differences conforming Fear of Being Different Stifles Talent
  • •29% altered their attire, grooming or mannerisms to make their identity less obvious •40% refrained from behavior commonly associated with a given identity •57% avoided sticking up for their identity group •18% limited contact with members of a group they belong to
  • When Performance Trumps Gender Bias: Joint versus Separate Evaluation Iris Bohnet Alexandra van Geen Max H. Bazerman Harvard Business School Working Paper 12-083 | March, 2012
  • 1. language & logic 2. employment practices 3. orientation toward difference 4. decision making 5. relational networks 6. balanced outcomes 7. access 8. behavioral intelligence 9. inclusive leadership
  • inclusive leadership • Are there specific behaviors, actions and outcomes that are developed, supported and rewarded (for all employees)? • Are there specific behaviors, actions and outcomes that are developed, supported and rewarded (for managers)?
  • inclusive leadership • assertive communication • conflict management • seeking out dissent & novelty • bridge building • relationship focus (size & diversity of network, trust) • actively checking blind spots
  • www.joegerstandt.com joe.gerstandt@gmail.com www.twitter.com/joegerstandt www.linkedin.com/in/joegerstandt www.facebook.com/joegerstandt 402.740.7081