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What Every Project Manager Should Know About Itil

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This presentation will provide a high-level view of ITIL and will identify where the ITIL Service Lifecycle Framework and the PMBOK Guide complement each other. …

This presentation will provide a high-level view of ITIL and will identify where the ITIL Service Lifecycle Framework and the PMBOK Guide complement each other.
Understanding of ITIL will help the IT project manager over the lifecycle of their projects, from defining a better project charter focused on IT services to a smoother transition to operations and an increased satisfaction of all stakeholders.
The role of an IT PMO as the Voice of IT and its role with Service Level Management will also be discussed as a key enabler to align IT to the business.

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  • ITIL 1.0 2000 ITIL 2.0 2004 ITIL 3.0 2007
  • Initial chart, puts the following charts in context
  • Service Strategy: focused on service management as a organizational capability, but also as a strategic asset – it ensures organizations are able to accommodate costs and risks with their service portfolios, are set up for operational effectiveness, and distinctive performance Strategy Generation: The process responsible for generating a Strategic Plan designed to achieve defined Objectives. This includes the highest of three levels of Planning and delivery (Strategic, Tactical, Operational). Strategic Activities include Objective setting and long-term Planning to achieve the overall Vision. Demand Management: Activities that understand and influence Customer demand for Services and the provision of Capacity to meet these demands. At a Strategic level Demand Management can involve analysis of Patterns of Business Activity and User Profiles. At a tactical level it can involve use of Differential Charging to encourage Customers to use IT Services at less busy times. See also Capacity Management. Service Portfolio Management: The Process responsible for managing the Service Portfolio. Service Portfolio Management considers Services in terms of the business value that they provide. Service Portfolio is the complete set of Services that are managed by a Service Provider. The Service Portfolio is used to manage the entire Lifecycle of all Services, and includes three Categories: Service Pipeline (proposed or in Development); Service Catalogue (Live or available for Deployment); and Retired Services. See also Service Portfolio Management, Contract Portfolio. Financial Management: The Function and Processes responsible for managing an IT Service Provider’s Budgeting, Accounting and Charging Requirements. Financial Management is concerned with three main processes of Budgeting, IT Accounting and Charging. Budgeting is the process of predicting and controlling the spending of money within the enterprise and consists of a periodic negotiation cycle (usually annual) to set limits on budgets and the day to day monitoring of the current budgets. IT Accounting is the set of processes that enable the IT organisation fully to account for the way its money is spent - particularly the ability to identify costs by Customer, by service, by activity. Charging is the set of processes required to charge Customers for the services supplied to them. To achieve this requires sound Accounting, to a level of detail determined by the requirements of the analysis, billing and reporting processes.
  • Service Design: focused on service design and development of services and service management processes, plus changes and improvements to services, continuity of service, achievement of service levels, and conformance to standards and regulations Supplier Management: Goal is to manage suppliers and the services they supply, to provide seamless quality of IT service to the business, ensuring value for money is obtained Information Security Management: Goal is to align IT security with business security, and ensure that information security is effectively managed in all service and Service Management activities IT Service Continuity Management: responsible for taking risk reduction measures to reduce the chances of major disasters occurring and for the production of an IT recovery plan which interfaces into the overall business continuity plans. The IT recovery plans will need to be cost effective and justified by the business. Goal is to ensure that the required IT technical and service facilities (including computer systems, networks, applications, data repositories, telecommunications, environment, technical support and Service Desk) can be resumed within required, and agreed, business timescales Capacity Management: The focal point for all IT performance and capacity issues. It is essential that Capacity Management has a close, two way relationship with the business strategy and planning processes within an organisation. The process needs to understand the long term strategy of the business while providing information on the latest ideas, trends and technologies being developed by the suppliers of computing hardware and software. Goal is to ensure that cost-justifiable IT capacity in all areas of IT always exists and is matched to the current and future agreed needs of the business, in a timely manner Availability Management : concerned with the design, implementation, measurement and management of IT infrastructure availability to ensure the stated business requirements for availability are consistently met. Availability Management will consider all aspects of the IT infrastructure and supporting organization which may impact availability, including training, skills, policy, process, procedures and tools. Goal is to ensure that the level of service availability delivered in all services is matched to, or exceeds, the current and future agreed needs of the business, in a cost-effective manner Service Level Management (SLM): Responsible for planning, coordinating, drafting, agreeing, monitoring and reporting on Service Level Agreements (SLAs), and the ongoing reviewing of service achievements to ensure that the required and cost justifiable service quality is maintained or where necessary improved. SLAs provide the basis for managing the relationship between the provider and the Customer goal is to maintain and improve IT service quality, through an annual cycle of ratifying service level agreements (SLAs), monitoring and reporting upon IT service achievements to these SLAs, and instigation of actions to eradicate poor service. Service Catalogue Management: Goal is to ensure that a Service Catalogue is produced and maintained, containing accurate information on all operational services and those being prepared to be run operationally
  • Service Transition is focused on moving new or changed services into the live production environment - how requirements of Service Strategy encoded in Service Design are effectively realized in Service Operation while controlling the risks of failure and disruption: Transition Planning and Support responsible for Planning all Service Transition Processes and coordinating the resources that they require. These Service Transition Processes are Change Management, Service Asset and Configuration Management, Release and Deployment Management, Service Validation and Testing, Evaluation, and Knowledge Management. Knowledge Management The Process responsible for gathering, analysing, storing and sharing knowledge and information within an Organization. The primary purpose of Knowledge Management is to improve Efficiency by reducing the need to rediscover knowledge. Evaluation: Service Testing and Validation Evaluation The Process responsible for Validation and Testing of a new or Changed IT Service. Ensures that the IT Service matches its Design Specification and will meet the needs of the Business. Release Management and Deployment Management The primary Objective of Release Management is to ensure that the integrity of the Live Environment is protected and that the correct Components are released Very closely linked with Configuration Management and Change Management, and undertakes the planning, design, build, and testing of hardware and software to create a set of release components for a live environment. Activities cover the planning, preparation and scheduling of a release to Customers and locations Responsible for Planning, scheduling and controlling the movement of Releases to Test and Live Environments.. Deployment Management is the Activity responsible for movement of new or changed hardware, software, documentation, Process, etc. to the Live Environment Service Asset and Configuration Management: Asset Management is the Process responsible for tracking and reporting the value and ownership of financial Assets throughout their Lifecycle. Configuration Management is responsible for maintaining information in the CMDB about Configuration Items required to deliver an IT Service, including their Relationships. This information is managed throughout the Lifecycle of the CI. Change Management: The Process responsible for controlling the Lifecycle of all Changes. The primary objective of Change Management is to enable beneficial Changes to be made, with minimum disruption to IT Services Covers the process of IT Change for all types of Change, from the Request for Change, to assessment, to scheduling, to implementing, and finally to the review. It is the Change Management process that produces approval (or otherwise), for any proposed Change.
  • IT Operations Management Function: Applications Management Function: Technical Management Function: Transition Planning and Support Service Desk Function The Service Desk differs from the other main areas of Service Management in that it is not a process but is the central point of contact for Customers to report difficulties, complaints or questions. Additionally the Service Desk extends the range of services allowing business processes to be integrated into the Service Management infrastructure by providing an interface for other activities such as Customer Change requests, maintenance contracts, software licenses, Service Level Agreements and Configuration Management. Many Call Centers and Help Desks naturally evolve into Service Desks to improve and extend overall service to the Customers and the business.
  • Request Fulfillment/Management: The Process responsible for managing the Lifecycle of all Service Requests. Event Management: The Process responsible for managing Events throughout their Lifecycle. Events are a change of state that has significance for the management of a Configuration Item or IT Service. Access Management Access Management is the process of granting authorized users the right to use a service, while restricting access to non-authorized users. It also has been called Identity or Rights Management in some organizations. Problem Management The Process responsible for managing the Lifecycle of all Problems. The primary objectives of Problem Management are to prevent Incidents from happening, and to minimize the Impact of Incidents that cannot be prevented The goal of Problem Management is to minimize the adverse impact of Incidents and Problems on the business that are caused by errors within the IT Infrastructure, and to prevent recurrence of Incidents related to these errors. In order to achieve this goal, Problem Management seeks to get to the root cause of Incidents and then initiate actions to improve or correct the situation. The Problem Management process has both reactive and proactive aspects. The reactive aspect is concerned with solving Problems in response to one or more Incidents. Proactive Problem Management is concerned with identifying and solving the underlying causes of Incident before they recur. Incident Management The primary goal of the Incident Management process is to restore normal service as quickly as possible following loss of service, and to minimize the adverse impact on business operations, thus ensuring that the best possible levels of service quality and availability are maintained. An Incident is defined as any event which is not part of the standard operation of a service and which causes, or may cause, an interruption to, or a reduction in, the quality of that service. The Process responsible for managing the Lifecycle of all Incidents. The primary Objective of Incident Management is to return the IT Service to Customers as quickly as possible.

Transcript

  • 1. What Every Project Manager should know about ITIL’s Service Lifecycle Framework Daniel Cayouette PMP - daniel@cayouette.com Sept 19, 2009
  • 2. Presentation Objectives
    • This presentation will provide a high-level view of ITIL and will identify where the ITIL Service Lifecycle Framework and the PMBOK Guide complement each other.
    • Understanding of ITIL will help the IT project manager over the lifecycle of their projects, from defining a better project charter focused on IT services to a smoother transition to operations and an increased satisfaction of all stakeholders.
    • The role of an IT PMO as the Voice of IT and its role with Service Level Management will also be discussed as a key enabler to align IT to the business.
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 3. Outline
    • Intro to ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library)
      • Methods Used to Manage IT Services
      • ITIL V3 Processes and Services Lifecycle
      • A Service-based Approach
      • Strategic Benefits
      • What ITIL is Not (key to managing expectations)
    • Benefits to a Project Manager
      • ITIL and the PMBOK Guide
      • Stakeholders: How ITIL can help to Identify them
      • IT PMO – Voice of IT
      • IT PMO : Service Strategy and Design
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 4. Intro to ITIL (IT Infrastructure Library) © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 5. Methods Used to Manage IT Services Somewhat old information and a small sample size Source: INS 2006, 227 global IT Professionals. ITIL Framework Adoption Trends Companies w/ Rev > $1B 2004 – 13% 2006 – 40% 2008 – 60% Source: Forrester 2005 How Critical is ITIL to IT Process Management? Companies w/ Rev > $1B Critical – 41 % Somewhat Critical – 45% Not So Critical – 13% Not at all Critical – 1% Source: INS 2006 Source: INS 2006, 227 global IT Professionals.
  • 6. ITIL v3 - Service Lifecycle Framework Defines everything that IT does in a holistic way Source: © http://www.itil.org
  • 7. A Service-based Approach
    • Focus on services that support business objectives
    • Services are managed according to business value
    • Maintain the balance between quality and cost
    • Effectiveness and efficiency
    Transition to IT Service Management Key Enabler to align IT to the Business Source: © Nortel ITIL Program
  • 8. Strategic Benefits
    • Provides a documented framework for IT best practices (V3 April 2007)
    • The best practices in ITIL can be adopted in an evolutionary manner
    • Provides a holistic, connected and integrated approach to IT
    • Provides a common language / terminology
    • Improves communication and information flow between IT departments
    • Provides a model for IT business alignment
    • Improves interfaces between IT and its customers and suppliers
    • Improves user productivity & morale
    • There are hundreds of thousands of IT professionals worldwide who know, and use, ITIL
    • Numerous opportunities for sharing and learning; e.g. the ITIL users forum – itSMF
    • Affords graduated levels of Certification for individuals.
    • The basis for the ISO 20000 Certification for Companies
    • Growing number of tools to support implementation
    • A growing community of resources, vision and common reference
    Source: © Nortel ITIL Program
  • 9. What ITIL is Not (key to managing expectations) Source: © Nortel ITIL Program What ITIL is NOT What ITIL IS A proprietary method or formula A framework of best practices as used in the industry A set of templates or processes A set of recommendations for approach and process activities Easy to adopt / A magic bullet Involves a long term commitment to cultural change A project A state of mind – there is no fixed end For only certain areas of IS – e.g. just the Help Desk Requires the participation of the whole IS organization Something consultants can do for you Something you have to build / own yourself with help as required An exclusive answer Works in concert with your existing organization & other methods A new organization chart Roles based rather than organization hierarchy based An add-on or overlay An ongoing activity of everyone in the organization
  • 10. ITIL V3 Processes and Services Lifecycle Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation Continual Service Improvement 7 Step Improvement Process Service Reporting Service Measurement Financial Management Service Portfolio Mgmt. Demand Management Strategy Generation Service Level Mgmt Availability Mgmt Capacity Mgmt IT Service Continuity Management Information Security Management Supplier Management Change Mgmt Service Asset and Configuration Mgmt Release and Deployment Mgmt Transition Planning & Support Service Validation & Testing Evaluation Knowledge Mgmt Service Desk Function Incident Management Problem Management Access Management Event Management Request Fulfillment Technical Management Function IT Operations Management Function Application Management Function Service Catalogue Management Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications From ITIL V2 New in ITIL V3 Functions Legend:
  • 11. Benefits to a Project Manager © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 12. ITIL and the PMBOK Guide
    • Structure will look familiar to PMPs
      • 5 Lifecycle Model books vs. 5 Process Groups & 9 Knowledge Areas
      • ITIL: 23 Processes & 4 functions vs. PMBOK V4 42 processes
      • Common to PMBOK Guide processes and ITIL processes:
        • Inputs
        • Methods and techniques
        • Outputs
      • Each ITIL Process also defines
        • Value to the business
        • Policies, principles and basic concepts
        • Interfaces
        • Triggers
        • Activities
        • Key Performance Indicators
        • Challenges, Critical Success Factors and risks
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 13. Stakeholders: How ITIL can help to Identify them
    • PMBOK v4 brought more focus on stakeholders as a key to project success
    • ITIL can help in identifying stakeholders
      • Each project will typically touch one or more Services and Processes
        • Each Service has a Service Owner
        • Each Process has a Process Owner and many Process Managers
      • Service Level Management identifies the Business primes that have agreed to and expect specific service levels
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 14. Stakeholders: Service Catalog Management
    • Service Catalog has 2 categories:
      • Business Services Catalog
        • A Business service identifies functionality in business terms
        • Services typically are at a higher-level compared to applications
            • e.g. Return to Repair, Order to Cash, Idea to Market
      • Technical Services Catalog
        • Underpins Business Services
        • Are not typically visible to the business
      • Catalogs includes
        • Service Pipeline (future)
        • Active Services
        • Retired Services
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 15. IT PMO as the Voice of IT – IT PMO roles within ITIL Customer End Users Service Desk Service Portfolio Management (IT PMO) Service Owners (Business and Technical Services) Manages and Operates the Services in the Service Catalog Source: © Nortel ITIL Program
    • IT PMO can be in a good position to be r esponsible for
      • Executing Service Level Management and Service Strategy
      • Managing the Service Pipeline
      • Major changes to business services and applications
  • 16. Projects and Service Strategy & Design
    • Service Strategy
      • Provides IT specific guidance for project selection and portfolio management
      • Integrates with the Define Project charter process
    • Service Design
      • Integrates with Project Planning process group
      • Identifies areas of scope that needs to be considered and assessed for IT projects that introduce and change Services:
        • Suppliers, Security, Service Continuity, Capacity, Availability, Service Levels, Service Catalog
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 17. ITIL V3 Processes and Services – Service Strategy
    • Service Strategy: focused on envisioning and conceptualizing the set of services which help achieve business objectives
      • Strategy Generation – creates strategic plans to achieve defined objectives, including long-term planning to achieve an overall vision through analysing and defining the market, the opportunities, the needs, and the desired outcomes
      • Demand Management – seeks to understand and influence customer demand for services through analysis of patterns of demand and identification of potential service level packages to support or modify demand, and to provision appropriate capacity
      • Service Portfolio Management – considers services in terms of the value they provide to the business, and manages the entire lifecycle of all services in a portfolio based on this value proposition, including those in the pipeline, live services, and those retired
      • Financial Management – concerned with three main financial processes of budgeting, IT accounting, and charging strategies, including consumption-based billing for consumed services and selected service levels; supports the identification of the financial value of IT services and the value of the underlying assets in provision of these services, and supports operational forecasting
    Legend: Green = new process in ITIL V3.0 Key links to Define Charter Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation
  • 18. ITIL V3 Processes and Services – Service Design
    • Service Design – focused on design, development and continuity of services , their availability and continuity, achievement of service levels, and conformance to standards and regulations:
      • Supplier Management – manages suppliers and their service provision for quality and value
      • Information Security Management – aligns IT security with business security, and ensures it is effectively managed in all services and activities
      • IT Service Continuity Management – implements cost effective and agreed risk reduction measures to lower the chance of major disasters occurring, or the impact if they do occur; identifies and plans recovery measures according to agreed priorities and timelines
      • Capacity Management – integral to IT performance and capacity issues, including from a long-term strategy perspective; researches and ensures timely provision of cost-justifiable IT capacity in all areas, matched to current and future agreed needs
      • Availability Management – focuses on design, implementation, measurement, and management of IT infrastructure availability
      • Service Level Management - identifies and agrees to business customer service level needs, monitors and reports on performance to these, and instigates actions to eradicate poor service, in order to maintain and improve service quality
      • Service Catalogue Management – catalogues IT-provided services with associated service provision information, service levels, prices for services and service levels, and enables self-help; allows if appropriate for the customer to order or change services
    Legend: Green = new process in ITIL V3.0 Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation
  • 19. Projects and Service Transition
    • Service Transition
      • Provides guidance on what is needed for a successful project transition to production/operations
      • Focus on Releases turns changes into projects that adds business value
      • The PMBOK’s Organization Assets translates to the ITIL Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS)
      • KM is a critical component of capturing the knowledge of your projects for use by the Service Operations Functions to enable sustained benefits
        • A bug report sometimes turns out to be really design-intent or a feature request depending on the scope of the projects that introduced and/or changed that service
        • Making that determination at Level 2 or Level 1 is much cheaper with a faster resolution than leaving it to Level 3 to assess
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 20. Separating Incidents from Service Requests
    • Incident (Negative value)
      • Incident is any event which is not part of the standard operation of a service and which causes or may cause disruption to or a reduction in the quality of services and Customer productivity.
    • Service Request (Positive value)
      • A Service Request is
        • A) a Request for Information (RFI) or advice
        • B) a Request for Administration Assistance (RFA)
        • C) a Request for Change (RFC) – integrates with Change Management
    Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications
  • 21. ITIL V3 Processes and Services – Service Transition
    • Service Transition is focused on moving new or changed services into the live production environment - how requirements of :
      • Transition Planning and Support – plans all service transition processes listed below, and coordinates the resources they require
      • Knowledge Management – gathers, analyses, stores, and shares information within an org. about services and support (also integral to Service Catalogue)
      • Evaluation – assesses new or changed IT services to ensure risks are managed to determine if to proceed with a change, and to compare actual to intended outcomes
      • Service Validation and Testing – validates and tests new or changed services, ensuring it matches design specifications, and will meet business needs
      • Release and Deployment Management – creates a set of release components (i.e., plan, design, build and test hardware, software, documentation, etc.); plans for release (includes preparation and scheduling of a release to customers and location); deploys to live environment
      • Service Asset and Configuration Management – performs full lifecycle management of IT and service assets (acquisition through disposal); maintains information and relationships about configuration items required to deliver an IT service; ensures that changes are controlled
      • Change Management – controls the lifecycle process of change to the environment, from requests for change, through assessment and approval, scheduling, implementation, and post-implementation review – enables beneficial changes with minimum disruption
    Legend: Green = new process in ITIL V3.0 Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation
  • 22. ITIL V3 Processes and Services Lifecycle – Continuous Improvement
    • Continual Service Improvement is focused on evaluating services and identifying ways to improve their utility and warranty in support of business objectives :
      • Combines principles, practices and methods from quality management, Change Management, and capability improvement
      • Focuses on both incremental and large-scale improvements in service quality, operational efficiency, and business continuity
      • Links improvement efforts and outcomes with service strategy, design, and transition
      • Employs a closed-loop feedback system based on the “Plan, Do, Check, Act” (PDCA model)
      • Integrates with the PMI Quality knowledge area
      • Improvements plans become projects
    Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation Continual Service Improvement
  • 23. Continual Service Improvement
      • Focused on changing data to information, knowledge and wisdom
        • Works well with other data focused methodologies such as six sigma
        • Starts with an alignment and identification of vision and goals
        • 7 steps:
          • Define what you should measure
          • Define what you can measure
          • Gather the data
          • Process the data (into information)
          • Analyze the data (into knowledge)
          • Present and use the information (wisdom)
          • Implement corrective action
    Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications
  • 24. ITIL V3 Processes and Services -
    • Service Operation is focused on managing services on an ongoing basis to ensure their utility and warranty objectives are achieved. It consists of both functions (below) and processes (next chart):
      • IT Operations Management Function – service providers which perform the daily activities needed to manage IT services and the supporting IT infrastructure, including operations control and facilities management
      • Application Management Function – the function which manages applications through their lifecycle
      • Technical Management Function – the function responsible for providing technical skills (and defining roles of support groups, tools, processes and procedures) in support of IT services and management of the IT infrastructure
      • Service Desk Function – the single and central point of contact for customers to report difficulties, complaints or questions, to place service requests, and to initiate appropriate other processes (such as Incident Management); handles communications with the user community on the status of their incidents
    Legend: Blue = a new functional group in ITIL V3.0 Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation
  • 25. ITIL V3 Processes and Services -
    • Service Operation is focused on managing services on an ongoing basis to ensure their utility and warranty objectives are achieved. It consists of both functions (previous chart) and processes (below):
      • Request Fulfillment – manages the lifecycle of all Service Requests
      • Event Management – manages events (i.e., a change of state significant for the management of a configuration item or IT service) through their lifecycle
      • Access Management - grants authorized users the right to use a service, while restricting access to non-authorized users
      • Problem Management - seeks the root cause of Incidents; initiates actions to improve or correct the situation; identifies and solves Problems / Known Errors before Incidents occur
      • Incident Management – detects and records incidents; classifies and performs initial support; does investigation and diagnosis; performs resolution and recovery; assumes responsibility for incident ownership, monitoring, tracking and communication
    Legend: Green = new process in ITIL V3.0 Source: © Nortel ITIL Program & ITIL V3 Core Publications Service Strategy Service Transition Service Design Service Operation
  • 26. Leading Change – John P. Kotter
    • 8 steps for effective change
      • 1) Establishing a sense of urgency
      • 2) Creating the guiding coalition
      • 3) Developing a vision and strategy
      • 4) Communicating the change vision
      • 5) Empowering employees for broad-based action
      • 6) Generating Short-term wins
      • 7) Consolidating Gains and Producing more change
      • 8) Anchoring New approaches in the culture.
    © 1996 John P. Kotter
  • 27. Best Service is No Service - How to Liberate Your Customers from Customer Service, Keep Them Happy, and Control Costs
      • Challenge customer Demand for service Instead of coping with it
        • 1) Eliminate Dumb Contacts
        • 2) Create Engaging Self-service
        • 3) Be proactive
      • 4) Make it really easy to contact your company
      • 5) Own the actions across the company
      • 6) Listen and act
      • 7) Deliver great service experiences
        • a) Companies are stuck with service expectations that have forgotten who the customer is
        • b) Companies are stuck obsessing about Speed, Not Quality, as an overall measure of Service (If so, they have the wrong metrics)
        • c) Companies are stuck thinking that faster is more efficient
    © 2008 Bill Price, David Jaffe
  • 28. Stakeholders: “Process Ownership” vs “Process Execution”
    • Process Ownership *
    • Owns and provides the process design
      • Develops, documents, implements, and improves process design
      • Ensures process is understood and adopted
      • Manages interfaces with other processes and handles exceptions
    • Serves as the overall champion and advocate for the process
      • Represents process within the organization and ensures alignment
    • Monitors process performance and the environment, initiating action as appropriate
      • Sets process performance requirements
      • Accountable for process performance (effectiveness and efficiency)
    • Process Execution
    • Executes select process activities per the design
    • Self-directed member of a “process team” with the context and empowerment to make decisions
    • Appropriately takes initiative to meet customer needs
    • Performs work, solves problems, has ownership of results
    • Acts with understanding of the customer, business and process
    • Contributes to continuous process improvement
    Source: © Nortel ITIL Program
  • 29. References to learn more
    • Official site - http://www.itil-officialsite.com/home/home.asp
    • Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_Technology_Infrastructure_Library
    • ITIL certification paths: http://www.itil-officialsite.com/Qualifications/ITILV3QualificationScheme.asp
      • ITIL Foundation Level
      • ITIL Intermediate Level - Service Lifecycle & Service Capability Streams
      • ITIL Expert Level
      • ITIL Master
    • ITIL® and IT Service Management http://www.itil.org.uk/index.htm
    • ITIL V3 Glossary of terms - http://www.best-management-practice.com/officialsite.asp?DI=575004&FO=1230366
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette
  • 30. Q&A
    • Feel free to send follow up questions:
      • daniel@cayouette.com
    © 2009 Daniel Cayouette