Joe Bouthillier Luminosity
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Joe Bouthillier Luminosity

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Lumosity and Alzheimer's.

Lumosity and Alzheimer's.

What are the benefits of the game service for your brain versus other activities? Is there anything truly special about Lumosity?

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Joe Bouthillier Luminosity Joe Bouthillier Luminosity Document Transcript

  • I've heard of a few games out there that may be good to help keep your mind sharp and help protect it from Alzheimer's.! ! luminosity categoriesI believe there is a multitude of activities you can participate in to help keep your brain active and sharp. Luminosity is a collection of simple games categorized into different areas of your brain or mind: Attention, Flexibility, Memory, Speed, and Problem Solving.! ! While they are backed by a whole lot of marketing a scientific team substantiated with studies, there doesn't seem to be anything truly special about Luminosity itself. Yes it is good to keep your brain active and to indulge in these simple tasks or games, though many of them you can find the equivalent online for free.! ! Luminosity makes me wonder whether playing regular video games would have a similar effect on the productivity or lucidity of one's mind. I believe it would, in the sense that video games ask you to be directly engaged, and to concentrate on a super - immediate level.! ! There are a few games in Luminosity which are pointed at specific areas which are meant to trick the mind, and over time you become used to them, and attempt to build on your previous performance.! ! Something they would use is the Stroop Effect, a psychological test which asks the participant to read the written word of the color and to ignore the color the word is typed in. For instance you would see the word "blue" in green, "red" in yellow, "black" in brown, and so on. Luminosity would offer you a similar game.! ! So essentially they ask $14 a month for minimum one year subscription to give you access to various brain teasers. You would be expected to regularly engage in these games, track your "score" and improve upon them over time.! ! Though the games are pointed at specific conundrums (perhaps too strong a word...) for your mind to grapple with, there are plenty of other ways of getting the same exposure. And in a strange way, playing a regular video game, which asks you to be more invested in the experience, may have a bigger reaction with your brain than these sodoku, crossword like time killers.! ! Try out the free trial of luminosity and see what you really think. I recommend trying it, and trying other things while you are at it. As in learn a new craft, pick up a real video game, or learn a new kind of math. For all it costs, and all it is marketed up to be, Luminosity seems sort of superficial.