Virtualisation Academy - Private Cloud

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This is the presentation slide desk that I used at System Dynamics/Microsoft Ireland Private Cloud Computing Academy on November 26th, 2010.

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Virtualisation Academy - Private Cloud

  1. 1. System Dynamics Private Cloud Academy Aidan Finn aidan.finn@systemdynamics.ie Paul Hall Paul.Hall@systemdynamics.ie
  2. 2. 1/30/2015 2 System Dynamics - Overview  Established 1968  Acquired 1997 from UK parent by current management  Ireland’s largest indigenous IT Business Solutions Company  Winner of Deloitte Best Managed Companies Awards 2009 and 2010  Hyper-V and System Centre  SharePoint  ASP.NET, SQL, InfoPath
  3. 3. Private Cloud Academy  One of four modules • Module I: Hyper-V and Private Cloud Computing • Module II: Managing Hyper-V (14 January 2011) • Module III: Hyper-V and Data Protection Manager (18 March 2011) • Module IV: Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (20 May 2011)  Very important that we learn from today so please fill out your feedback forms.  There is a prize !!
  4. 4. About Aidan Finn  Infrastructure Team Lead at System Dynamics  http://www.systemdynamics.ie  Working in IT since 1996  MCSE & MVP (Virtual Machine)  Experienced with Windows Server/Desktop, System Center, virtualisation, and IT infrastructure.  Blog: http://www.aidanfinn.com
  5. 5. Mastering Hyper-V Deployment 600 pages of how to do a Hyper-V project A-Z
  6. 6. Also  Mastering Windows Server 2008 R2 (Sybex, 2009) - 4 chapters  Mastering Windows 7 Deployment (Sybex, TBA) - 6 chapters  10215A: Implementing and Managing Microsoft Server 2008 R2 Virtualization – Technical reviewer
  7. 7. Agenda  What makes Hyper-V different? (Level 100)  System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 (Level 300)  Microsoft’s private cloud (Level 300) • System Center Virtual Machine Manager Self- Service Portal 2.0  The future? (Level 100)
  8. 8. What Makes Hyper-V Different?
  9. 9. Introducing Hyper-V  Microsoft’s enterprise-ready hardware virtualisation platform  Features include: • Clustering for fault tolerance • Shared storage • Live Migration • Hardware integration for performance • Superior security • Dynamic Memory (Service Pack 1) • RemoteFX (Service Pack 1)
  10. 10. Architecture Applications Applications Applications Non- Hypervisor Aware OS Windows Server 2008, 2003 Windows Kernel VSC VMBus Emulation VMBus “Designed for Windows” Server Hardware Windows Server 2008, x64 Windows Kernel Xen-Enabled Linux Kernel Linux VSC Hypercall Adapter Parent Partition Child Partitions VMBus Hyper-V VSP VM Service WMI Provider VM Worker Processes OS ISV / IHV / OEM Hyper-V MS/ XenSource User Mode Kernel Mode Windows Server 2008, x64 Windows Kernel Windows Drivers Windows Drivers
  11. 11. Clustering VHD
  12. 12. Benefits of Hardware Virtualisation  Lower costs: • Licensing (even Microsoft!) • Power • Rack space • Hardware support • Capital expenditure  Easier management: • Rapid deployment of new machines • Dealing with files, not hardware  Greener computing
  13. 13. Etc, Etc, Etc  That’s no different to the others? • Citrix • VMware • RedHat • Oracle  Maybe … but they deal with the virtualisation stack  Hyper-V isn’t the endgame … it’s the start!
  14. 14. What Makes Hyper-V Different?  Hyper-V is an enabler  New, improved, easier, more efficient management: • Backup • Monitoring • Helpdesk, change control, and process • Workflow and process • Deployment • Management  It allows us to change how we do IT infrastructure: Microsoft System Centre
  15. 15. Backup and Recovery  Backup is just way too hard right now  System Center Data Protection Manager 2010  Backup virtual machines at the storage level every night  Backup business data every 15 minutes  Secondary site replication  “Bare metal recovery” of a VM is similar to restoring a Word document  Data consistencey: Volume Shadow Copy Service
  16. 16. Storage Level Backup
  17. 17. Monitoring  We need to monitor more than just the virtualisation layer  System Center Operations Manager 2007 R2  Monitor the complete infrastructure: • Network (3rd party now, see OpsMgr 2012) • Servers and storage (OEM) • Virtualisation (in cooperation with SCVMM/PRO) • Operating System (MS: Windows and Linux) • Services and applications (OEM and 3rd party) • Azure
  18. 18. More Than The Usuals  Data warehouse and reporting  Client perspective monitoring • Know about problems before the users do  Distributed application monitoring • ITIL/MOF view of a “service” • Modeled based on components and dependencies  Service level agreement (SLA) monitoring • Based on distributed applications • Dashboard and reporting
  19. 19. Complete Vertical and Horizontal Monitoring
  20. 20. Helpdesk, Change Control, and Process  System Centre manages IT infrastructure  Humans play a role in this process  Need a system to unify human and machine in the process  System Center Service Manager 2010 • Helpdesk • Configuration management database • Define processes, control and track compliance • Built in processes for ITIL • Integrates with System Center family
  21. 21. Automated Workflow  Many actions are repeated and follow scripts  They require systems integration  Microsoft System Center Opalis • Automate best practices • Allow the datacenter to respond to changing requirements • Integrates System Center, Active Directory, and 3rd party products  For example: request new deployment in Service Desk, and Opalis orchestrates the process
  22. 22. System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2
  23. 23. Virtualisation Management  You can manage all aspects of Hyper-V with built-in tools: • Hyper-V Manager • Failover Clustering Manager  System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2 provides a central point for managing many host servers. • Easier administration • More automation • P2V • Cross hypervisor support & V2V
  24. 24. VMM Components  VMM Server: The VMM service • 1 server • Cannot be clustered  Library: Stores virtualisation assets • A file share • 1 default one of VMM server • Place local to Hyper-V hosts • Can be a clustered file share • Should not be replicated, e.g. DFS-R
  25. 25. VMM Components Continued  Database: A SQL Server/Express database • Stores VMM data • Also contains metadata for files in library  Self-Service Portal: End user provisioning of VMs • An IIS website  Admin Console: Includes PowerShell module for VMM  Agent: Installed on every managed host
  26. 26. VMM Architecture  5-10 Hosts • Single server: 2 GB RAM, 40 GB disk  11-20 Hosts • Single server: 4 GB RAM, 50 GB disk  21-150 Hosts • VMM server: 4 GB RAM, 150 GB disk • Library server: ? GB disk  >150 Hosts • VMM server: 8GB RAM, 50 GB disk • Library server: ? GB disk • Database server: ? GB RAM, ? GB disk
  27. 27. VMM Scalability  VMM can really scale  Up to 400 hosts  Up to 8,000 virtual machines
  28. 28. Supported Hosts  Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V  Hyper-V Server 2008 R2  Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V  Windows Server 2003/R2 Virtual Server 2005 R2 SP1  VMware vCenter 2.5 & VirtualCenter 2.0.1 • ESX Server 3.5 • ESX Server 3.0.2 • ESX 3i  VMware vSphere 4.0 (VI3 features only)
  29. 29. Taking Control of Hosts  Add host via wizard • Will automatically deploy Virtual Server 2005 R2 SP1 to W2003 hosts if required • Will enable Hyper-V role if required • Will add a cluster if you select a cluster node  VMware • Add the vSphere management server • Optionally import library contents* • Add additional ESX hosts
  30. 30. Host Groups  A way to organize managed hosts  Used for: • Configuring policy • Delegating administrative access  Group hosts based on: • Delegated administration • VM placement • Common policies  A cluster cannot span host groups
  31. 31. PRO  Performance and Resource Optimization  Integration with Operations Manager 2007 via PRO management packs • Built-in MS management packs • OEM/partner management packs • Self-authored  OpsMgr detects fault/performance issue  VMM uses Intelligent Placement • Relocate VMs to most suitable host in the Hyper-V cluster
  32. 32. PRO Illustrated
  33. 33. The Library  The heart of VMM  It will need plenty of disk • Consider cheaper & bigger disk  Store: • Templates • ISO • VHD • Offline VMs • PowerShell scripts • Hardware profiles • Answer files
  34. 34. Constrained Delegation  Required to allow VMs to directly mount library ISO files  Active Directory administration • Open properties of each Hyper-V host computer object • Delegation tab -> Use Any Authentication Protocol • Add -> Enter library server name -> select CIFS
  35. 35. Templates  Used as a reference to quickly create new virtual machines  Time saver for admins  Basis of self-service VM provisioning  Links/contains: • VHD • Hardware profile • OS deployment customization • Quota value
  36. 36. Creating a Template 1. Create a reference VM 2. Mount Windows ISO and install 3. Configure the OS (app. Install and patching) 4. Shut the VM down 5. Use VMM to “Create Template” • Runs SYSPREP • Stores a new template in the library/location of your choice • Removes the reference VM
  37. 37. Patching Library Contents  Virtual Machine Servicing Tool 3.0 (free download)  Integrates WSUS/ConfigMgr with VMM  Requires a host identified as a maintenance host.  Patches: • Template VHDs in the library • VHDs in the library • Offline VMs on host/in library
  38. 38. Administration & Delegation  Much easier to do this in VMM than in Hyper- V (via AzMan)  User Roles are created from user role profiles: • Administrator: Cannot create new user role. Reinforces the importance of this user role. • Delegated administrators: Delegate rights to host groups/libraries • Self-Service User: Can use the Self-Service Profile
  39. 39. Self-Service Portal  “What is the delay in deploying my server?”  Web interface that non-VMM administrators can use to deploy their own VMs • Aimed at branch IT, faculty IT, application managers/developers/testers, etc  Let end users deploy/manage their own VMs  Remove IT from the process • Manage the “compute cluster”  End up with happier end users
  40. 40. Configuring Self-Service Portal Access  Administrators configure: • Library template quota value • Self-service user role membership • Template permissions • Host group availability • Task access • Library access • Quota to restrict VM sprawl  Delegated users log in and deploy/manage VMs for themselves
  41. 41. Problems with Self-Service Portal  Doesn’t provision: • Networking placement • IP configurations • SAN • Load balancers  Quota isn’t comparable to resource usage  Isn’t extensible  Does not provide cross-charging  No dashboard for administrators/accountants  But isn’t this starting to get closer to cloud computing?
  42. 42. Private Cloud Computing
  43. 43. What is Cloud Computing?  NIST (USA National Institute of Standards and Technology) definition is commonly referenced  “Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources”
  44. 44. Essential Characteristics  On-demand self-service  Broad network access  Resource pooling  Rapid elasticity  Measured service
  45. 45. Types of Cloud Computing  Software-as-a-Service (SaaS): Subscribe to a multi-tenant application such as Office365, Salesforce, etc  Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS): a computing environment that you can build an application on. No OS access.  Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)*: A computing environment where we provision virtual machines with OS access
  46. 46. Location, Location, Location  Choose the most suitable location for applications and data: • Regulations, contracts, privacy, trust, capacity, etc  Public cloud: Multi-tenant environment on the Internet such as Azure, AWS, etc  Private cloud: Shared pool of resources, or compute cluster, built in internal data centre and shared with internal business units  Cross-premises (hybrid) cloud: Infrastructure is a mix of private cloud and public cloud
  47. 47. The Forecast is Cloudy!  Cloud computing is here to stay  IT infrastructure exists to provide applications  We must optimise how we do that  A private cloud • Enables us to focus on infrastructure management • Allows the business to deploy IT when they need it • Centralise IT infrastructure and delegate access
  48. 48. Example  A University  Centralised IT infrastructure • A compute cluster (Hyper-V/SAN/Networks) • Systems management and virtualisation skills  Faculties are consumers of IT services • Faculty IT subscribe to compute cluster resources • Central IT charges faculty based on utilisation  Costs are minimised  Deployment is rapid and flexible
  49. 49. Microsoft’s Private Cloud  System Center Virtual Machine Manager Self Service Portal 2.0 *gasp for air here* (SCVMM SSP 2.0)  Free download  Leverages: • VMM 2008 R2 • PowerShell • Library resources
  50. 50. Features of SSP 2.0  Private cloud computing  Cross-charging based on utlisation  Extensible VM actions: PowerShell, VBS, CMD  Configure network binding • Static IP addresses or DHCP  Delegated administration  Provision SAN/Network load balancers
  51. 51. SSP 2 Architecture
  52. 52. Service Accounts  SSP 2.0 Server • Domain user account • Local administrator on SSP 2.0 service server • VMM administrator  Portal application pool • Domain user account • Non-administrator
  53. 53. Hardware Requirements  Single server deployment • 4 GB RAM, 50 GB disk  Portal server • 4 GB RAM, 2 GB disk  SSP server • 4 GB RAM, 2 GB disk  Database server • 4 GB RAM, 50 GB disk
  54. 54. Software Requirements  Portal server • Windows Server 2008 R2 • IIS • .NET 3.5 SP1  SSP server • Windows Server 2008 R2 • .NET 3.5 SP1 • PowerShell 2.0 • MSMQ (Directory Integration) • VMM 2008 R2 Administrator Console
  55. 55. Software Requirements Continued  Database server • Windows Server 2008 R2 • SQL Server 2008
  56. 56. Configure SSP 2.0  Settings • Specify VMM server • Add devices (SAN/Load Balancers) • Add networks • Add domain names • Specify resource (memory & disk) costs • Specify environments (production, UAT, etc)  Add templates & costs  Share the URL
  57. 57. The Process Administrator Business User Delegated User Request business unit Approve Request infrastructure Request service Request service role(s) Request template(s) Specify delegated users Approve Build virtual machine(s) Build virtual machines(s)
  58. 58. The Cloud Model
  59. 59. The Cloud Model Continued  Private Cloud • VMM, SSP 2.0, compute cluster  Business unit • Contains infrastructures  Infrastructure: • Specify total memory/disk • Defines costs • Contains services • Defines templates
  60. 60. The Cloud Model Continued  Service: • Specify memory/disk • An application architecture, e.g. N-Tier • Defines all networks • Host Group* • Library* • Custom costs*  Service Role • A network tier in the application architecture
  61. 61. User Roles  DCITAdmin • SSP 2.0 administrators  BUITAdmin • Business unit administrators • Request infrastructures and services/roles  AdvancedOperator • Deploy/Create/Delete virtual machines, etc  BusinessUser • Deploy virtual machines, etc  Custom defined roles
  62. 62. Dashboard  A SharePoint website  Deployment Reporting: • Business units • Infrastructure • Service • Service Roles  Utilization Reporting  Chargeback Reporting
  63. 63. Requirements  SCVMM SSP 2.0  SharePoint Service 3.0 SP2/SharePoint Server 2007 SP2  SQL Server 2008  .NET 3.5  IE7/IE8  Application pool user account: • Non administrator domain user
  64. 64. Customising the SSP Dashboard  Requires some SharePoint knowledge • Choose data sets • Bar graphs • Pie charts • Gauges • Data grids • Score cards • Delegated access via SharePoint site
  65. 65. The Future
  66. 66. Azure VM Role  Announced recently at PDC 2010  IaaS cloud computing in Azure  Deploy and virtual machines  Can use other VM services • SQL • AppFabric  Includes Server App-V • Service virtualisation • Allows zero downtime VM OS patching
  67. 67. Cross-Premises Cloud  VPN connectivity between on-premises and Azure  At PDC 2009, Bob Muglia announced future feature • Migrate VMs from private Hyper-V cloud to Azure  Azure VM Role management site • Looks very like VMM 2012 (vNext)
  68. 68. VMM 2012  Successor to VMM 2008 R2  RTM in H2 2011  Adds Service Templates • Define tiers of a server architecutre • Specify elasticity, e.g. 2-5 web servers • Specify networking • Deploy Server App-V, MSDeploy, SQL Apps
  69. 69. VMM 2012 Continued  Server App-V • Virtualise services, e.g. SQL or IIS • Patch VM templates • Deployed VMs are swapped out  Fabric management • Build Hyper-V hosts/clusters • Provision SAN and network  Seems to include much of SSP 2.0 approach  A private cloud infrastructure management solution
  70. 70. Action  Contact us for virtualisation assessment • 1 free day of consulting for today’s attendees (per organization) • Help you determine the right strategy for you • Complete the process and get one free copy of Mastering Hyper-V Deployment  Paul.Hall@systemdynamics.ie  01 4830355
  71. 71. One for everyone in the audience... Who completes a virtualisation assessment !
  72. 72. Private Cloud Academy  One of four modules • Module I: Hyper-V and Private Cloud Computing • Module II: Managing Hyper-V (14 January 2011) • Module III: Hyper-V and Data Protection Manager (18 March 2011) • Module IV: Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (20 May 2011)  Very important that we learn from today so please fill out your feedback forms.  There is a prize !!
  73. 73. Did I Stay On Schedule? Sales •http://www.systemdynamics.ie •Paul.Hall@systemdynamics.ie Aidan Finn •Aidan.Finn@systemdynamics.ie •@joe_elway •http://www.aidanfinn.com

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