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Global exchange for growth 03242010 v2
 

Global exchange for growth 03242010 v2

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  • WHAT DO WE DO??? In the past real estate and IT were separate functions…and sat in different part of the org chart. The REALITY today is how corporate RE and IT have evolved into a single organization. under WORKPLACE SOLUTIONS Another aspect of Real Estate to consider is how it is evolving in relation to IT. Today’s Enterprise infrastructure consists of half Real Estate and half IT. In the future, we see the lines between Real Estate and IT blurring. This would mean that service providers should be able to provide services for both RE and IT.
  • WHAT HAS CHANGED? 1) A major change has been the nature of work…has gone from individual to collaborative. In the past 80% of work was individual and 20% collaborative and that has inversed to 80% collaborative and 20% individual 2) Infrasture has changed…it is wirelss and mobile. In the 60’s cubes mades sense from a space planning perspective but now with the shift in worktype… NO DEDICATED SPACE is the way to go. EX: in cisco all we really need is the network and a laptop
  • They reported that they spend 55% of their work time at their desks and 45% of their time away from the desks. Offices were observed occupied only 24% of the time. Average occupancy of offices on Mondays was observed at 19% while average occupancy on Fridays was observed to be 3% higher at 22% Cubicles were observed occupied only 28%. Average occupancy of cubicles on Mondays was 30%; average occupancy on Friday was 20%.
  • WHAT IT IS Next generation workplace – generic term and initiative, tied to WPRs’ vision – Transform the Work Experience Cisco Connected Workplace - developed & improved over 6 years Space, Technology, & Policy elements Space : variety of workspaces, lower panels, collaboration, shared, provisioned based on need, historic use Tech : laptops, ubiquitous high-density wireless, IP telephony with Extension Mobility, Multi-Function Printers Policy : needs-based use of resources (hot desking), occupant groups self-manage space with support from WPR Successes – deployed with Sales, G&A Locations in SJ: SJ-11/2 (IBSG, IT, ConC), SJ-14/3 (Customer Service), SJ-SYC3 (IT, LR), SJ-MR (Cisco Services, Ops)   Benefits: Space becomes flexible, elastic >> BU & corporate agility e.g. Dan Smoot: added 23% more people for free, no MAC costs Higher use More collaboration Higher client sat Higher productivity   Costs: Same as a standard refresh of furniture etc Address it in stages if desired – furniture first   Opportunities: “ Rightsize” RE portfolio   Risks / Concerns: Services – parking, restrooms
  • As measured on multiple projects, totaling approx 500k sq ft: SJ-11/2, SJ-14/3, McCarthy Ranch Bldgs 2 & 3 Numbers& composition of bookable meeting rooms typically the same in each environment Unassigned assets encourage “green” use of workspaces – employees can use any asset for as long as needed, giving it back to the pool for others when finished
  • Pictures of just some of the available workspaces… Open Plan Workstations have much more access to natural light, enable teams to easily co-locate and collaborate at will Dens give teams a “home base” in the neighbourhood and can be used for a variety of tasks, from individual work to team work, study, etc APRs provide non-bookable, enclosed workspaces for ad hoc meetings as well as private or confidential conversations Recreation spaces give workers an opportunity to interact socially, take a break, and “decompress”
  • In 2006, Cisco initiated a collaborative program with the Clinton Foundation, committed to the Clinton Global Initiative, in conjunction with three founding cities; San Francisco, Amsterdam and Seoul. In 2008, four European cities joined CUD: Birmingham, Hamburg, Lisbon and Madrid.
  • The Connected Urban Development blueprint includes solutions in the following areas: Teleworking for businesses as well as city workers. Successful implementation will depend on the availability of a citywide broadband infrastructure. Intelligent traffic management . IP-based solutions offer dynamic traffic management and rerouting of private transportation. Promoting public transportation . Increase use of public transportation by feeding real-time information to smartphones and PDAs. Reducing municipal CO 2 emissions . Implement intelligent building management and “connected workplace” concepts. Building smart communities . Cultivate citizen involvement in innovative green solutions. All of these solutions are built upon a foundation of connected civil, building, and network infrastructures.
  • 1. Global energy consumption is increasing, and cities are responsible for more than 75% of this consumption. • Buildings are responsible for 62.5% of total electricity consumption, 36% of total primary energy use, and 30% of total greenhouse gas emissions. • This is causing global climate change , through the use of fossil fuels. And it is irreversibly impacting our natural resources. The ecological footprint (see Wikipedia) per capita is 2.3 hectares or 1.4 earths. The ecological footprint of Western society is between 5 and 8 hectares, meaning 3 to 5 earths (US). So, it takes 5 earths to provide the current Western population with energy, water, food, building material and other consumables to maintain current consumption and lifestyle. www .leeds.ac.uk/socenv/weblog/82.html   2. •Productivity is negatively impacted by increased commute time and expenses, more stress on workers, and other factors. Pressure to increase productivity is causing cities to look at ways to improve collaboration . • Technology helps organizations achieve collaboration without the expense and pollution of bringing workers to the city, as it essentially brings the city (in the form of other people and information) to the workers.   3. The way we work is changing . There are now more workers and fewer employees. Work patterns are more ‘fluid’ and is moving away from fixed “9 to 5” schedules. Work and workers are becoming central, while buildings are not. • Also, the global talent pool has evolved , as more workers are available and easily accessible from outside the country. • And the number of knowledge workers and mobile workers has increased , and these workers are demanding collaborative, flexible forms of work. Technology can provide the tools needed to help these workers do their jobs — without increasing mobility demands and putting pressure on travel and transportation. • There is greater demand to improve the quality of life and health of workers and employees alike. Telecommuting and flexible work schedules are on the rise.
  • Smart Work Center (SWC) is a public and state-of-the-art work environment with high speed Internet connectivity, flexible work stations in an innovative IT environment embedded in a socially conducive service setting. Mobile workers avoid travel and traffic congestions with the effect of reducing CO 2 emissions and a more efficient use of time and resources. “ A Smart Work Center (SWC) is an office center within a close proximity of a residential community, that allows workers to be positioned centrally and pervasively within the context of their work, their peer work groups and relevant work processes with the help of innovative IT solutions and high-end connectivity, and offers them flexible work stations embedded in a socially conducive service setting. By doing so, workers can benefit by avoiding physical traffic, which in turn means fewer CO 2 emissions and a more efficient use of time and resources.” By Bas Boorsma Additional benefits include: Shift from individually assigned work space to a more open environment Less space is needed per employee Reducing real estate expenses Reducing building energy consumption
  • The next-generation Smart Work Center will evolve into a cohesive, comprehensive work and community center, integrating healthcare, education, government, and socially-inclusive services for the elderly and for underprivileged people, such as the disabled, minorities, and children. Aging professionals, women re-entering the workforce, elderly residents wanting life-long learning, and others who want work processes with flexible hours and less travel can all benefit from this socially-conducive, socially-innovative environment.
  • The next-generation Smart Work Center will evolve into a cohesive, comprehensive work and community center, integrating healthcare, education, government, and socially-inclusive services for the elderly and for underprivileged people, such as the disabled, minorities, and children. Aging professionals, women re-entering the workforce, elderly residents wanting life-long learning, and others who want work processes with flexible hours and less travel can all benefit from this socially-conducive, socially-innovative environment.

Global exchange for growth 03242010 v2 Global exchange for growth 03242010 v2 Presentation Transcript

  • Bringing Collaboration to Life Global Exchange for Growth Relina Bulchandani Director, Internet Business Solutions Group Global Lead Connected Real Estate March 24, 2010
  • Agenda
    • Cisco Real Estate
    • Shifting Workforce
    • Cisco Connected Workplace
    • Proof of Concept
    • Smart Work Centers
    • Innovation Centers & Community Hubs
    • Questions
  • Cisco’s Real Estate Portfolio A Laboratory for Innovative Real Estate and Technology Solutions Portfolio 23M sq ft 56% owned Persons housed 75,000+ Countries 90+ Buildings 595+
  • Shifting Workforce Traditionalist
    • Trait: Paternalistic
    • Leadership Style: Top-down
    • Career: Pay dues, build legacy
    • Value: Loyalty
    • Rewards: Job security and recognition
    Boomer
    • Trait: Optimistic
    • Leadership Style: Consensus
    • Career: Competitive; change agents
    • Value: Opportunity
    • Rewards: Money, title and perks
    Generation X
    • Trait: Skepticism
    • Leadership Style: Competence
    • Career: Resourceful, self-manage
    • Value: Freedom
    • Rewards: Transferable benefits, flexibility and balance
    Millennials (Gen Y)
    • Trait: Empowered
    • Leadership Style: Non-hierarchical
    • Career: Cutting-edge vs. experience
    • Value: Diversity and social responsibility
    • Rewards: High pay, interesting work and work/life balance
    Born 1928–1945 Born 1946–1964/5 Born 1965/6–1980 Born 1980–2000 Source: Based in part on “Meeting the Challenges of Tomorrow's Workplace,” CEO Magazine, 2005
  • Cisco Today: Boomer Leadership; Gen X and Millennial Workforce (All Generation View – Cisco Population Worldwide) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Traditionalist Boomer Generation X Millennials FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 FY08 Current FY09 FY10 FY11
  • Cisco Tomorrow: Millenials Pass Boomers Market Transition: New Source of Productivity (Data represents Cisco global population) Millennials are largest US generation (75M) since Baby Boomers (80M). Gen Xers = 40M.
  • Collaboration via “virtual work practices” is rapidly evolving As our employee population changes, so do our work styles
  • Virtual & Physical Solutions Are Converging Integrating Space, Technology and Services Enterprise Infrastructure LEGACY Enterprise Infrastructure TODAY
  • The Way People Work Is Changing Work Done in the Office Is Increasingly Collaborative Group Work Working Alone WORK STYLES Source: Gartner Dataquest, 2002 Cisco Two Major Changes Are Driving The Need For a New Workplace Design Infrastructure is More Mobile You no longer need to be in one place to be productive
    • Lap-tops & other mobile devices
    • Web-based applications
    • Wireless Network
    • Internet Based Telephony and Video
    • Collaboration Software
    • VPN and Network Security
    Percentage of Individual’s Work Product That Will Depend on Group Input 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
  • Meanwhile, our space allocation remains the same — and is underutilized Data as at Q4FY09 includes only partial Scientific Atlanta, WebEx and Ironport portfolios, excludes offline buildings
  • Cisco’s Solution – Connected Workplace
    • A group-assigned environment with a variety of shared open and closed workspaces that give teams and individuals choices to support their work.
    • Key physical attributes include: no more than seated height privacy at open workstations, closed door spaces that emphasize collaboration, and personal storage that is separated from the individual workspace.
    • Day-to-day space use is established and managed by the occupants in tandem with WPR.
    Group-assigned Variety, Choice Seated Privacy Collaborative Distributed Storage Group-managed “ ” SPACE + TECHNOLOGY + POLICY
  • Typical Results * Excludes specialty spaces, labs, etc Typical floor in San Jose Traditional Cisco Connected Workplace Usable Area 49,000 sq. ft. 49,000 sq. ft. Work Space 70% individual 30% individual 30% collaborative 70% collaborative Use Pattern Traditional, Assigned Flexible, Unassigned Design Capacity 300 (fixed) 440 (nominal) Enclosed Meeting Spaces 16 72 Usable Area / Capacity* 163 sq. ft. 111 sq. ft. Chargeback per Employee $5,162 per year $2,596 per year
  • audio privacy den recreation workstation
    • CUD Goals
    • five Year Cisco commitment
    • work with major cities to develop innovative solutions using ICT (information and communications technology) to reduce carbon dioxide emissions
    • to forge blueprints, models, policies and practices that help to create a successful, connected, competitive, attractive and sustainable 21 st century city
    • the development and exchange of relevant thought leadership and replicable methodologies between CUD Cities and beyond.
    Connected Urban Development (CUD)
  • Connected Urban Development (CUD) www.connectedurbandevelopment.org Business Transformation Enabled by Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Three founding cities: In 2008, four new cities joined: 2006 Seoul San Francisco Amsterdam Madrid Birmingham Hamburg Lisbon
  • Connected Urban Development A Blueprint for City Transformation Broadband Platform – 4 th Essential Infrastructure IP-Enabled Homes and Offices, Roads, Utilities, Workplace Design Sustainable Urban Planning Connected & Sustainable Work Smart Work Centers Digital Swarming & Hub Pavilions Connected Workplaces Connected Workforce Connected & Sustainable Buildings Homes Office Buildings Public Spaces Public Transit Hubs Hospitals and Schools Connected & Sustainable Mobility Smart Transportation Pricing Personal Travel Assistant Connected Public Transportation Connected & Sustainable Energy Renewables & co-Generation Urban Monitoring & Measurement Citizens Energy Efficiency Sustainable Socio - Economics Active Citizenship & Eco Maps Innovative Green Business Models and Sustainability Clusters
  • Mega Trends Impacting the Urban Work Environment
    • Energy and Sustainability:
    • Quest for sustainable modes of work and transport
    • Access:
    • Urban Mobility
    • Access to work, information and education for all – the remote, the aging, the newly started
    • Changing the Way We Work & ICT:
    • Work follows the worker
    • Push to improve quality of life
    • Collaboration and autonomy
    • A work force in flux
    Copyright © 2007, 2008 , 2009 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco Highly Confidential
  • Bring Information to the User, Not the User to the Information
  • Why move people and information, if you can move information alone?
    • A Smart Work Center (SWC) is an office center within a close proximity of a residential community, that allows workers to be positioned centrally and pervasively within the context of their work, their peer work groups and relevant work processes with the help of high end broadband powered innovative IT solutions, next generation video connectivity and collaboration tools, and offers them flexible work stations embedded in a socially conducive service setting.
    • Smart Work Centers help substitute phyical traffic by bringing work to the worker rather than the conventional opposite practice. Smart Work Centers provide enhanced access to work, data and services to the remote, the commuting, the elderly and the newly started. Smart Work Centers help forge an innovative and connected urban work environment, spurring job creation and enterprise incubation
    Smart Work Center
  • Smart Work Center: an Integrated Service Concept
    • Flexible work stations/ conference rooms
    • Lounge work places
    • Telepresence facilities
    • Restaurant/ Business Club/ Catering
    • Child day care
    • Bank
    • IT Support
    • Notary and legal advice
    • Employment agency
    • Easy physical access, close proximity to highway
  • Smart Work Center Concept
  • CUD Smart Work Center – Facts Amsterdam Almere
    • CUD Smart Work Center Pilot launched in Almere, the Netherlands, September 2008
    • Launching Customers SWC Pilot: Cisco, HP, IBM, Municipality of Amsterdam, Ministry of Transport & Waterworks
    • Scaling Effort to result in 10+ SWCs in the Netherlands in 2009. A national umbrella organization is being launched in order to manage standards, collective reservation systems and interoperability of ICT solutions
    • CUD Replication efforts (planning, sourcing and in some case actual implementation) under way in Korea, Lisbon, Buenos Aires, Germany, France, United States, Kenya and New Dehli
  • Smart Work Center for all Social Innovation: Enhancing a community based platform Inclusive | Citizen Experience | Society | Inclusive | Citizen Experience | Society | Healthcare Education Aging Well Government
  • Amsterdam The Hague Rotterdam Almere SWC in 2008: One Proof of Concept & Pilot
  • Amsterdam The Hague Rotterdam Almere 2010
  • Double U Chain of SWCs, Portfolio Approach, forging a distributed work environment Idistributed Work – International Hub – Access for all – Bringing work to the Worker Governance Public Telepresence One Stop Shop Booking Tool WorkSnug Market Organizer Standards, Label Independent Platform
  • MySmartWorkSpace Reservation Tool
    • SWC Wherever, Whenever: Work
    • Space follows the Worker
    • Multimodal
    • Selection, Reservations & Payments
    • ‘ One-Stop-Shop’ for Employers,
    • SWC users
    • Integration into EcoMaps
  • www.w-smartwork.nl
  • Public Telepresence
  •  
  • Double U Fact Sheet
    • Initiated by City of Amsterdam and Cisco under CUD, founded by Cisco, ABN AMRO, Rabobank and several SWC providers. Double U is a foundation under Dutch law.
    • Public Launch of Double U and Double U tool on March 23, 2010
    • Double U commences with 21 SWCs, with 30 more ready to become part of the Double U network throughout 2010, totaling over 50 SWCs throughout the Netherlands
    • Double U to facilitate and embed a public Telepresence network. First SWC to feature Telepresence is Amsterdam Bright City (June 2010)
    • Double U to feature ‘Worksnug’ as part of its portfolio. Worksnug is an augmented reality smart phone application mapping public work locations
  • Global SWC Replication efforts CUD Cities Non-CUD Cities San Francisco PBC – Bay Area Venga - Idaho Buenos Aires Lisbon France Kenya New Dehli Korea/Seoul Germany The Netherlands New South Wales Dubai
  •