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An Introduction toBen Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rulesof Interface DesignJochen Wolters@jochenwolters
They hate poorlydesigned ones!Users don’t lovegreat user interfaces.Users don’t lovegreat user interfaces.
via http://daringfireball.com
DesignROI ?
∆$ = ∆t ✕$t
Give UpSelect ProductsCheck out(& Register)Sign UpLog In orContinueGive Up
$ ?$300MThe $300 Million Buttonsource: http://www.uie.com/articles/three_hund_million_button/Additional revenue in first ye...
DesignROI ?!!
Ben Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rules of Interface DesignFrom:“	Designing the User Interface:	 Strategies for Effective Huma...
1.	Strive for consistencyConsistent sequences of actions should be required insimilar situations; identical terminology sh...
1. Strive for consistency
“The World” rocker switch, dial , …1. Strive for consistency(scripts, script direction, …)Cultural Regionhome appliance, c...
1. Strive for consistency
1. Strive for consistency✔➜“information scent”consistent terminology is key
1. Strive for consistency
1. Strive for consistency
1. Strive for consistency
1. Strive for consistency
2.	Enable frequent users to use shortcutsAs the frequency of use increases, so do the usersdesires to reduce the number of...
2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts
2. Enable frequent users to use shortcutsLevel 1⌘C / ⌘VLevel 2Level 3
2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts
3.	Offer informative feedbackFor every operator action, there should be some systemfeedback. For frequent and minor action...
3. Offer informative feedback0,1 s 1,0 s 10 sExperiencingcause and effectTaking turns ina conversationTypical humanattenti...
3. Offer informative feedback
3. Offer informative feedback
4.	Design dialog to yield closureSequences of actions should be organized into groupswith a beginning, middle, and end. Th...
4. Design dialog to yield closure
4. Design dialog to yield closure
4. Design dialog to yield closuresource: http://www.headphone.com/
4. Design dialog to yield closure
5.	Offer simple error handlingAs much as possible, design the system so the usercannot make a serious error. If an error i...
3. Offer simple error handling
3. Offer simple error handling
5. Offer simple error handling
5. Offer simple error handling
6.	Permit easy reversal of actionsThis feature relieves anxiety, since the user knows thaterrors can be undone; it thus en...
6. Permit easy reversal of actions
6. Permit easy reversal of actions
6. Permit easy reversal of actions
6. Permit easy reversal of actions
7.	Support internal locus of controlExperienced operators strongly desire the sense thatthey are in charge of the system a...
7. Support internal locus of control
7. Support internal locus of control
7. Support internal locus of control
7. Support internal locus of controlmodal non-modalinspectordialog box
7. Support internal locus of controlquasi-modal⇧command⌃⌥⌘controloptionshift+keyclickormodifier keys
7. Support internal locus of controlclick and dragclick and drag + ⌘resizerotate
7. Support internal locus of control
7. Support internal locus of controlTime-outs arePURE EVIL
HotelAlarmClocksHotelAlarmClocks7. Support internal locus of control
7. Support internal locus of controlDear DHL customer,since no actions were initiated on your part for a longer period oft...
7. Support internal locus of control
8.	Reduce short-term memory loadThe limitation of human information processing inshort-term memory requires that displays ...
Understanding a simple sentence can — ifinterrupted with a tangent like this one, whichcontains just twenty words, but alr...
8. Reduce short-term memory load7 ± 2“Chunks” of Informationsource: http://www.musanim.com/miller1956/
8. Reduce short-term memory loadsource top: http://www.headphone.com/
8. Reduce short-term memory load
8. Reduce short-term memory loadDeck 3→
1. Strive for consistency2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts3. Offer informative feedback4. Design dialog to yield c...
Ben Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rules of Interface Designhttp://faculty.washington.edu/jtenenbg/courses/360/f04/sessions/sch...
Donald NormanTheDesign ofEverydayThings
http://www.slideshare.net/jochen_woltersThanks a lotfor interfacingwith me today!Find these slides at:An Introduction toBe...
An Introduction to Ben Shneiderman's Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design
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An Introduction to Ben Shneiderman's Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design

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Shneiderman's Golden Rules explained via numerous everyday examples from both the digital and analog realms.

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Transcript of "An Introduction to Ben Shneiderman's Eight Golden Rules of Interface Design"

  1. 1. An Introduction toBen Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rulesof Interface DesignJochen Wolters@jochenwolters
  2. 2. They hate poorlydesigned ones!Users don’t lovegreat user interfaces.Users don’t lovegreat user interfaces.
  3. 3. via http://daringfireball.com
  4. 4. DesignROI ?
  5. 5. ∆$ = ∆t ✕$t
  6. 6. Give UpSelect ProductsCheck out(& Register)Sign UpLog In orContinueGive Up
  7. 7. $ ?$300MThe $300 Million Buttonsource: http://www.uie.com/articles/three_hund_million_button/Additional revenue in first year at $25B retailer
  8. 8. DesignROI ?!!
  9. 9. Ben Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rules of Interface DesignFrom:“ Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction.”
  10. 10. 1. Strive for consistencyConsistent sequences of actions should be required insimilar situations; identical terminology should be usedin prompts, menus, and help screens; and consistentcommands should be employed throughout.Workflows / ProcessesFunctionalityAppearanceTerminology
  11. 11. 1. Strive for consistency
  12. 12. “The World” rocker switch, dial , …1. Strive for consistency(scripts, script direction, …)Cultural Regionhome appliance, car,TV, …System TypeiPhone/iPad,Windows,car nav,…PlatformMS Word,WordPress, eBay, …App
  13. 13. 1. Strive for consistency
  14. 14. 1. Strive for consistency✔➜“information scent”consistent terminology is key
  15. 15. 1. Strive for consistency
  16. 16. 1. Strive for consistency
  17. 17. 1. Strive for consistency
  18. 18. 1. Strive for consistency
  19. 19. 2. Enable frequent users to use shortcutsAs the frequency of use increases, so do the usersdesires to reduce the number of interactions and toincrease the pace of interaction. Abbreviations, functionkeys, hidden commands, and macro facilities are veryhelpful to an expert user.Keyboard shortcutsHidden “Power User” featuresAutomation
  20. 20. 2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts
  21. 21. 2. Enable frequent users to use shortcutsLevel 1⌘C / ⌘VLevel 2Level 3
  22. 22. 2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts
  23. 23. 3. Offer informative feedbackFor every operator action, there should be some systemfeedback. For frequent and minor actions, the responsecan be modest, while for infrequent and major actions,the response should be more substantial.RelevantFits importance and urgencyComprehensible and meaningfulWithin appropriate context (time & place)
  24. 24. 3. Offer informative feedback0,1 s 1,0 s 10 sExperiencingcause and effectTaking turns ina conversationTypical humanattention spanRespond tomouse click,key press, …Open window,bring up progressbar / spinner, …Wake machine,load file into app,start printing, …
  25. 25. 3. Offer informative feedback
  26. 26. 3. Offer informative feedback
  27. 27. 4. Design dialog to yield closureSequences of actions should be organized into groupswith a beginning, middle, and end. The informativefeedback at the completion of a group of actions givesthe operators the satisfaction of accomplishment, asense of relief, the signal to drop contingency plans andoptions from their minds, and an indication that theway is clear to prepare for the next group of actions.Grouping of actionsExplicit completion of an actionWell-defined options for the next step
  28. 28. 4. Design dialog to yield closure
  29. 29. 4. Design dialog to yield closure
  30. 30. 4. Design dialog to yield closuresource: http://www.headphone.com/
  31. 31. 4. Design dialog to yield closure
  32. 32. 5. Offer simple error handlingAs much as possible, design the system so the usercannot make a serious error. If an error is made, thesystem should be able to detect the error and offersimple, comprehensible mechanisms for handling theerror.Error prevention over error correctionAutomatic detection of errorsClear error notificationsHints for solving the problem
  33. 33. 3. Offer simple error handling
  34. 34. 3. Offer simple error handling
  35. 35. 5. Offer simple error handling
  36. 36. 5. Offer simple error handling
  37. 37. 6. Permit easy reversal of actionsThis feature relieves anxiety, since the user knows thaterrors can be undone; it thus encourages exploration ofunfamiliar options. The units of reversibility may be asingle action, a data entry, or a complete group ofactions.No interference with workflowMore freedom for the userSingle-action undo vs. action history
  38. 38. 6. Permit easy reversal of actions
  39. 39. 6. Permit easy reversal of actions
  40. 40. 6. Permit easy reversal of actions
  41. 41. 6. Permit easy reversal of actions
  42. 42. 7. Support internal locus of controlExperienced operators strongly desire the sense thatthey are in charge of the system and that the systemresponds to their actions. Design the system to makeusers the initiators of actions rather than theresponders.The user commands, the system obeysStrongly relies on Informative Feedback“The Principle of Least Surprise”
  43. 43. 7. Support internal locus of control
  44. 44. 7. Support internal locus of control
  45. 45. 7. Support internal locus of control
  46. 46. 7. Support internal locus of controlmodal non-modalinspectordialog box
  47. 47. 7. Support internal locus of controlquasi-modal⇧command⌃⌥⌘controloptionshift+keyclickormodifier keys
  48. 48. 7. Support internal locus of controlclick and dragclick and drag + ⌘resizerotate
  49. 49. 7. Support internal locus of control
  50. 50. 7. Support internal locus of controlTime-outs arePURE EVIL
  51. 51. HotelAlarmClocksHotelAlarmClocks7. Support internal locus of control
  52. 52. 7. Support internal locus of controlDear DHL customer,since no actions were initiated on your part for a longer period oftime, we have automatically closed your session for securityreasons.Please start DHL Online Postage with a new shopping cart.Your DHL TeamNew Shopping Cart
  53. 53. 7. Support internal locus of control
  54. 54. 8. Reduce short-term memory loadThe limitation of human information processing inshort-term memory requires that displays be keptsimple, multiple page displays be consolidated,window-motion frequency be reduced, and sufficienttraining time be allotted for codes, mnemonics, andsequences of actions.Clear structure: windows, dialogs, app in its entirety“Recognition over Recall”Implicit help
  55. 55. Understanding a simple sentence can — ifinterrupted with a tangent like this one, whichcontains just twenty words, but alreadynoticeably challenges your short-term memory— become a problem.8. Reduce short-term memory loadUnderstanding a simple sentence can — ifinterrupted with a tangent like this one, whichcontains just twenty words, but alreadynoticeably challenges your short-term memory— become a problem.
  56. 56. 8. Reduce short-term memory load7 ± 2“Chunks” of Informationsource: http://www.musanim.com/miller1956/
  57. 57. 8. Reduce short-term memory loadsource top: http://www.headphone.com/
  58. 58. 8. Reduce short-term memory load
  59. 59. 8. Reduce short-term memory loadDeck 3→
  60. 60. 1. Strive for consistency2. Enable frequent users to use shortcuts3. Offer informative feedback4. Design dialog to yield closure5. Offer simple error handling6. Permit easy reversal of actions7. Support internal locus of control8. Reduce short-term memory loadBen Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rules of Interface Design
  61. 61. Ben Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rules of Interface Designhttp://faculty.washington.edu/jtenenbg/courses/360/f04/sessions/schneidermanGoldenRules.htmlBruce “Tog” Tognazzini’sFirst Principles of Interaction Designhttp://www.asktog.com/basics/firstPrinciples.htmlJakob Nielsen’sTen Usability Heuristicshttp://www.useit.com/papers/heuristic/heuristic_list.htmlDieter Rams’Ten Principles for Good Designhttps://www.vitsoe.com/gb/about/good-design
  62. 62. Donald NormanTheDesign ofEverydayThings
  63. 63. http://www.slideshare.net/jochen_woltersThanks a lotfor interfacingwith me today!Find these slides at:An Introduction toBen Shneiderman’sEight Golden Rulesof Interface DesignJochen Wolters@jochenwolters | http://uiobservatory.com
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