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Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
Rh Bill
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Rh Bill

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Philippine RH Bill

Philippine RH Bill

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  • 1. Maria Cristina B. Daligcon Poverty, Population Growth and the Reproductive Health Bill
  • 2. Is Population Growth the Real Culprit? On one extreme, there are those who say that there is no population problem and hence, there is nothing the government needs to do about it. >> On the other hand, some view population growth as the principal cause of poverty
  • 3.
    • Despite the conflicting opinions, there are some common grounds on the following:
    >> Is Population Growth the Real Culprit?
    • Population is not the primary cause of lower living levels
    • It’s not numbers but quality of life
      • Population intensifies underdevelopment
  • 4. Is Population Growth the Real Culprit? Poverty is a complex phenomenon, and many factors are responsible for it such as: >> 1. Bad governance 2. High wealth and income inequality 3. Weak economic growth
  • 5.
    • Despite the conflicting opinions, there are some common grounds on the following:
    >> Is Population Growth the Real Culprit?
    • Population is not the primary cause of lower living levels
    • It’s not numbers but quality of life
      • Population intensifies underdevelopment
  • 6. Gini Concentration Ratios by Region: 2003 and 2006 =============================================== Region | 2006 | 2003 ------------------------------------------------------------- Philippines 0.4580 0.4605 National Capital Region 0.3988 0.4021 Cordillera Administrative Region 0.4418 0.4296 I - Ilocos 0.3953 0.3926 II - Cagayan Valley 0.4216 0.4410 III - Central Luzon 0.3994 0.3515 IVA - CALABARZON 0.4082 0.4036 IVB - MIMAROPA 0.4106 0.4358 V - Bicol 0.4428 0.4660 VI - Western Visayas 0.4326 0.4370 VII - Central Visayas 0.4639 0.4707 VIII - Eastern Visayas 0.4828 0.4580 IX - Zamboanga Peninsula 0.5054 0.5197 X - Northern Mindanao 0.4806 0.4817 XI - Davao 0.4225 0.4574 XII - SOCCSKSARGEN 0.4006 0.4774 XIII - Caraga 0.4452 0.4303 Autonomous Region 0.3113 0.3578 in Muslim Mindanao ------------------------------------------------------------ Source: 2003 and 2006 Family Income and Expenditure Survey National Statistics Office Republic of the Philippines Gini Coefficients are aggregate inequality measures 0 = perfect equality 1 = prefect inequality 0.50-0.70 = highly unequal income distribution 0.36-0.49 =relatively unequal income distribution 0.20-0.35 =relatively equal income distribution
  • 7.
    • Despite the conflicting opinions, there are some common grounds on the following:
    >> Is Population Growth the Real Culprit?
    • Population is not the primary cause of lower living levels
    • It’s not numbers but quality of life
      • Population intensifies underdevelopment
  • 8. Why the Need for Population Policy? >> Population Momentum Population growing rapidly in the past is likely to grow rapidly in the future.
  • 9. Why the Need for Population Policy? >> Two Basic Reasons
      • 1. Age structure of LDC/DC populations
  • 10. Population Pyramids: Ethiopia and the United States, 2005 >>
  • 11. Youth Dependency Ratio The proportion of youths (under age 15) to economically active adults (ages 15 to 64). IMPLICATION: The more rapid the population growth rate, the greater the proportion of dependent children in the total population and the more difficult it is for people who are working to support who are not >>
  • 12.
    • Philippine population reflected a 2.04percent average annual growth rate in the 2000-2007 period.
    • The 2007 dependency ratio was 66 for every 100 people working.
    • Half of the population were below 22 years old.
    >>
  • 13. Why the Need for Population Policy? >> Two Basic Reasons
      • 1. Age structure of LDC/DC populations
      • 2. High birth rates cannot be altered
      • overnight
  • 14.
    • Projections indicate that if total fertility rate continues to decline by 0.2 children every five years, replacement fertility of 2.1 per woman would be reached only by 2040.
    >>
      • High birth rates cannot be altered overnight
    • The effects of Population momentum would persist for another 60 years before population ceases to grow, by which time the Philippines’ total population would be 240 million.
  • 15. The Demographic Transition Stage I: High birthrates and death rates Stage II: Continued high birthrates, declining death rates Stage III: Falling birthrates and death rates, eventually stabilizing >>
  • 16. The Demographic Transition in Western Europe >>
  • 17. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043) OBJECTIVE/S: 1. To uphold and promote respect for life, informed choice, birth spacing and responsible parenthood in conformity with internationally recognized human rights standards. 2. To guarantee universal access to medically-safe, legal and quality reproductive health care services and relevant information even as it prioritizes the needs of women and children. >>
  • 18. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • Coverage of RH.
    • Information and access to natural and modern family planning
    • (2) Maternal, infant and child health and nutrition
    • (3) Promotion of breast feeding
    • (4) Prevention of abortion and management of post-abortion complications
    • (5) Adolescent and youth health
    • (6) Prevention and management of reproductive tract infections, HIV/AIDS and STDs
    >>
  • 19. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043) Coverage of RH. (7) Elimination of violence against women (8) Counseling on sexuality and sexual and reproductive health (9) Treatment of breast and reproductive tract cancers (10) Male involvement and participation in RH; (11) Prevention and treatment of infertility and (12) RH education for the youth. >>
  • 20. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • Controversies
    • The Catholic hierarchy has maintained its traditional stance against modern family planning methods particularly modern (“also referred to as artificial”) contraceptives
    • It is also labeled by some parties as “pro-abortion”, “anti-life”, and “immoral”.
    >>
  • 21. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • Controversies
    • The State acknowledges the difficulties posed for development by rapid population growth especially among the poorest Filipinos
    >>
  • 22. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • What People Say
    • The poor prefer smaller families, but they are unable to achieve their preference.
    • On the average, among the poorest 10% of women of reproductive age, 44% are unwanted
    • Average health spending per capita drops from PhP3,389 to PhP582
    >> Source: NSO Family Planning Survey, 2006
  • 23. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • What People Say
    • Larger families make less investments in human capital per child – investments that are crucial in breaking the chain of intergenerational poverty.
    • Average annual spending on education falls from PhP8, 212 for a one-child family to PhP 2,474 for a family with nine or more children.
    >> Source: FIES 2006 and LFS 2007
  • 24. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043)
    • Some Ambiguities in the RH Bill
    • Should the State subsidize family planning by the unmarried?
    • =It obliges the LGUs to spend on reproductive health care services half of the 20% of the IRA allotted to local government projects
    • 2. It fails to explicitly identify the poor and the uneducated as its target population, which could have implications for the cost-effectiveness of the program.
    >>
  • 25. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043) Some Ambiguities in the RH Bill 3. If Reproductive health and sex education in public schools should be compulsory, at what grade level should it start? 4. The notion of two children being the ideal family size (section 16 of RH Bill) may be difficult to defend. >>
  • 26. The Reproductive Health Bill (HB #5043) Synthesis: A sound population policy must be part of good governance to promote faster economic growth and reduce poverty. A well-funded national family planning programs that provide accurate information and access to all methods of contraception, is pro-poor, pro-women, pro-people and pro-life. >>
  • 27. Salus Populi Suprema Lex – The Welfare of the People is the supreme law >>
  • 28. Thank You! >>

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