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Need for change in Education in U.S.A

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The intent of this presentation is make you aware about the need for change in Education in U.S.A

The intent of this presentation is make you aware about the need for change in Education in U.S.A

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • 1. Do We Need a Change in Education?
    • Data proves reality.
    • The following two table represent two high schools in Fort Bend County.
    • Look at the data and reflect why one school is doing significantly better than the other one.
  • 2. School One
    • School One
    • W White/Non-Hispanic 39.9%
    • B Black/Non-Hispanic 18.2%
    • H Hispanic 10.4%
    • A Asian/Pacific Islander 31.4%
    • N American Indian/Alaska Native 0.2%
  • 3.  
  • 4. School Two
    • School Two
    • W White/Non-Hispanic 0.5%
    • B Black/Non-Hispanic 84.8%
    • H Hispanic 14.1%
    • A Asian/Pacific Islander 0.4%
    • N American Indian/Alaska Native 0.2%
  • 5.  
  • 6. Our Students are failing at High School
    • 1.23 million students of the Class of 2007 failed to graduate with their peers. That’s 30% of all students.
    • The groups with the lowest graduation rates are: Native Americans, Hispanics, and African Americans.
  • 7. Our Students are failing at High School
    • In 2003-2004 one third of the students failed to make the transition from 9 th to 10 th grade.
  • 8. Minorities Still at a Disadvantage
  • 9. Minorities Still at a Disadvantage
  • 10. Job Hunting is Tougher Than Ever
    • A research done by Alexander Mann Solutions, shows the following data:
    • Only 24 percent of students that graduated from university in 2009 are working in a role that requires a degree since leaving the university.
    • Just Imagine looking for a job with only a High School diploma.
  • 11. Gap Between Rich and Poor
    • 36 million Americans live in poverty.
    • 15 million live in extreme poverty, this means income equals $10,307 for a family of four.
    • 35 million people lack access to adequate food because they can not afford groceries.
    • Forty-seven million Americans are uninsured.
  • 12. Gap Between Rich and Poor
    • Forty million people in 2005 did not receive any type of health care. This includes some people with insurance as well as those who had none due to high cost.
    • Living in the richest country in the world and allowing millions of people to lack of the basic needs for a decent life, does not speak well of a standing leadership.
  • 13. Education Gap Between Rich and Poor Children
    • Books available for middle-class children were about 12 books per child in 2005.
    • Books available for poor-class children were about one book per every 355 children in 2005.
    • The gap grows when they are out-of-school because some have more opportunities to visit museums, specialized camps, library visits, etc.
  • 14. Can We Compete Globally?
    • A Harvard survey done in 2007 showed that 58% of men and 43% of women were going into finance or consulting.
    • Science and engineering degrees are what we need in order to compete in the world.
    • The days for the Wall Street cash machine are over.
  • 15. Can We Compete Globally?
    • “ Even though Massachusetts is ranked number one in student achievement, they are still not equipped to compete globally.” - Paul Grogan, president of The Boston Foundation.
    • In Japan students are capable of competing in math, science and are fluent in three languages, according to Dr. Dana Mohler-Faria.
  • 16. Fierce Competition for Young Americans
    • Young American face substantial competition entering the labor market.
    • In this global economy, employers could look for skillful workers all over the world to meet their firm’s needs.
  • 17. Fierce Competition for Young Americans
    • Unfortunately, High Schools students perform worse on international standardized tests more than students in other industrialized countries.
  • 18. How many did not Graduate from High School?
  • 19. ACT by the numbers
    • 30 percent of Texas seniors took the ACT in 2007.
    • 62 percent of test takers scored as likely to succeed in a college English composition class.
    • 41 percent scored as ready to succeed in a college algebra class.
    • 24 percent scored as prepared to succeed in college biology.
    • Source: Texas Education Agency
  • 20. Providing More Rigor in High Schools
    • Curriculum is disconnected from real life.
    • High Schools are impersonal systems where nobody cares about them.
    • “Project-Based Learning”(PBL) frame provides alternatives for these challenges.
    • Visit Buck Institute for Education for more PBL information.
  • 21. Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers: “ First and importantly, academic rigor is not about teaching children to correctly fill in bubbles on a test, but challenging them to think outside of the box. It’s about giving students a robust, solid and high-quality education through rich curriculum that pushes them to realize their full, God-given potential. Students should be engaged in all elements of a well-rounded education: the arts and physical fitness, knowing about different people and places, thinking critically and arguing logically, and appreciating the value of active citizenship. For the adults – educators, parents, policymakers and the community at large – academic rigor means working collaboratively and taking shared responsibility to provide every child an opportunity to succeed in life.”
  • 22. Do We Need More Mathematics?
    • Statistics show that our students were number one in completing college; now we are number 18 among 29 countries.
    • One reason is that our students arrive to college increasingly unprepared.
    • Greg Tobin, Pearson’s president of mathematics and statistics noted the following:
  • 23. Do We Need More Mathematics?
    • “ One of greatest predictors of whether or not a student will proceed to college and graduation is whether or not they complete three or more years of mathematics in high school,”
    • “ You’d go into class, sit down, the teacher would work problems at the board and then they’d say ‘Your homework is problems X, Y and Z out of your book,”
  • 24. One Solution for Mathematics Problem
    • Use technology, more specific web-base math education applications.
    • Students should work collaboratively to solve the problem.
    • They should be engaged and participate.
    • They should get instant feedback.
    • Community learning environments should be created.
  • 25. More Education Better Opportunities Source: U.S. Department of Education and National Center for Education Statistics. (2008)
  • 26. More Education Better Opportunities
    • The salary difference in 1980 between Bachelors degree and High School diploma or GED was $7,500.
    • The salary difference in 2006 between Bachelors degree and High School diploma or GED was $20,000.
  • 27. More Education Better Opportunities
    • The salary difference between 1980 and 2006 with Bachelors degree was $1,100 .
    • The salary difference between 1980 and 2006 with and High School diploma or GED was minus $11,400 .
  • 28. Education is a Lifetime Treasure and Gives Freedom.

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