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The Modern Age
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The Modern Age

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    The Modern Age The Modern Age Presentation Transcript

    • The Modern Age 1915 - 1945
    • Major Events of this Era
      • World War I:1914-1918
      • The United States experienced prosperity as its economy boomed:
      • But in 1929, the stock market crashed, beginning the Great Depression.
      • Twelve years later, World War II took place.
      • The devastation of World War I brought an end to the optimism immediately preceding World War II.
      • Most people felt uncertainty, disjointedness, and disillusionment.
      • People sought to find new ideas that were more applicable to twentieth century life.
      • The quest for new ideas extended into the world of literature: a major new literary movement known as “Modernism” was born.
    • Modernism
      • The movement experimented with a wide variety of new approaches.
      • It reflected the fragmentation of the modern world, omitting the expositions, transitions, resolutions, and explanations used in literature.
      • The themes of these works were usually implied, creating uncertainty in interpretation.
      • Prose and poetry frequently no longer followed formulaic patterns, thus confusing readers.
    • Imagism 1909 - 1917
      • Imagists rebelled against the sentimentality of nineteenth century poetry.
      • They demanded clear expression, concrete images.
      • Their models often came from the Greek and Roman classics.
      • Famous Imagists include
      • Ezra Pound
      • H.D.
      • and Amy Lowell
    • The Expatriates
      • This term refers to a number of American writers who became exiles, a “lost generation”, who became disillusioned by World War I , and they chose to live in Europe, especially in Paris.
      • They include several famous writers:
    • Ernest Hemingway
    • F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • T. S. Eliot