Teen Book Club Planning Project
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Teen Book Club Planning Project Teen Book Club Planning Project Document Transcript

  • Hit the Books!Baldwinsville Public Library Teen Book Club: Project, Marketing, and Assessment Plan Jennifer Wiley and Lora VanDenBerghe IST 613: Planning, Marketing, and Assessment 4/28/11
  • IST 613 2 Table of ContentsProject Plan Introduction………………………………………………………………………….…… 3 Relationship to Library Strategic Planning………………………………………….…… 3 User Needs Assessment…………………………………………………………….......... 3 Relevant Literature……………………….………………………………………………. 5 Recommendations for Action…………….……………………………………………… 7 Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………...12Marketing Plan Introduction………………………………………………………………………………13 Relevant Literature……………………………………………………………………….13 Marketing Goals and Outcomes………………………………………………………….15 Target Audience………………………………………………………………………….16 Positioning Statement…………………………………………………………………....17 Key Messages……………………………………………………………………………17 Message Delivery Strategies……………………………………………………………..17 Mockups of Selected Marketing Methods……………………………………………….22 Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………...27Assessment Plan Introduction………………………………………………………………………………28 Goals of the Service……………………………………………………………………...28 Outcomes of the Service (In order of priority)…………………………………………..28 Relevant Literature……………………………………………………………………….28 Assessment Plans Per Outcome………………………………………………………….30 Timeline for Continuous Assessment……………………………………………………41 Impact Rubric……………………………………………………………………………42 Works Cited……………………………………………………………………………...43
  • IST 613 3 Project PlanIntroduction The idea of a teen book club is not a new one, but more often than not these projects endup being abandoned as teens lose interest and motivation. However, there has been an increasedtrend in recent years to fight this by giving the teens more control over their clubs. For theBaldwinsville Public Library, this creates the opportunity not only to create and maintain a bookclub, but to increase the use of the young adult section and to be a part of building a foundationfor life long library users. The “Hit the Books” club will serve to offer teens of the community a monthly forumthrough which to discuss books and participate in activities. Moreover, it will give teens theopportunity to step into monthly leadership roles and explore their creativity by designing theirown activities as well as developing critical thinking skills. The meetings will occur once amonth for a duration of time to be determined by the teens during the first meeting. In eachmeeting, the teens, under the supervision of Valerie Chism (Val) and the direction of a TeenLeader to be chosen each month, will discuss the reading in depth, participate in an activitydesigned by the Teen Leader to accompany the discussion, and select the next month’s book andTeen Leader. A Teen Liaison appointed during the first meeting to maintain the position for theyear will then perform informal assessments through interactions with the members throughoutthe rest of the month and relay the information to Val who will use the feedback to make changesnecessary for maintaining, and hopefully expanding, the group. This plan is aimed at giving asmuch control as possible to the teens while allowing Val to keep a flexible role as supervisor, tostep in as necessary.Relationship to Library Strategic Planning According to the current mission statement and long-range plan, the young adult sectionhas not been a priority of the library beyond educational support in the past. However, there hasbeen talk of adjusting both the mission statement and the long-range plan (neither of which hasbeen updated in over ten years) and this book club could serve to reinforce the importance ofincluding young adult recreational services in both. The current long-range plan does, however,include a goal for educational support for high school students. Our program supports this goalthrough the forms of improved critical thinking and reading skills. Furthermore, the current planalso supports a mission of providing materials to “support cultural, recreational, and leisureactivities” (Baldwinsville Public Library Board of Trustees). The book club will includemonthly activities in relation to the readings that will support this goal as well. It is difficult toassess how the online aspect of the program fits with these statements due to their age, but as itwill aid in the previously mentioned aspects of the club, it too has qualities that support the long-range plan (Baldwinsville Public Library Board of Trustees).User Needs AssessmentKey Internal Stakeholders: ● Young Adult Librarian: Valerie Chism (Val) is currently on staff as the dedicated Young Adult Librarian at Baldwinsville Public Library. She is heading up the project and will serve as the supervisor of the club. Her main responsibilities will be to guide discussion with the monthly Teen Leader and to make sure all administrative issues are taken care of, including the purchase of materials and reserving the room. The project will serve to
  • IST 613 4 increase the popularity and use of her department within the library and give her the opportunity to build relationships with the local teens. ● Director of the Library: Though she will not be working on the project directly, as director Marilyn Laubacher has interest in seeing increased use of the library by users of all ages. She will be responsible for approving many of the administrative actions required of Val. ● Teen Liaison: A designated teen of the group who will serve as the bridge between the other teens and the library staff during the duration of the project. He/she will consult with Val to help recruit and maintain a group of teens for the club and perform informal assessments monthly to ensure the needs of the teen members are being met.Key External Stakeholders ● Teen Members: These are teens who choose to join the book club and attend on a regular basis. They will learn valuable skills in critical thinking and creativity and will be given the opportunity to step into the role of “Teen Leader”, improving their leadership and public speaking skills by leading discussions and activities. They will also have a significant say in how the club is run, within the guidelines of the library, and what materials will be used. ● Teen Non-members: These are teens who choose not to join the book club. Though they may not be directly affected by the events of the club, they may indirectly be affected through their peers to read more or to use the library more. They may also have the opportunity to learn some of the skills gained through the club through interactions with friends who do choose to participate. ● Parents of Teens: Parents will have the opportunity to see their teens with new skills and the opportunity for brighter futures. ● Teachers of Teens: Teachers may see improved grades and increased interest in materials as teens develop critical thinking skills and a greater interest in reading.Service Users 10th/11th Grade Reader: Teens in the 10th or 11th grade who already enjoy reading for pleasure. 10th/11th Grade Non-Reader: Teens in the 10th or 11th grade who do not enjoy reading for pleasure, but who may be interested in other aspects of the teen book club. 12th Grade Reader: Teens in the 12th grade who already enjoy reading for pleasure. 12th Grade Non-Reader: Teens in the 12th grade do not enjoy reading for pleasure, but who may be interested in other aspects of the teen book club.Needs based on internal/external assessments At this point, any formal forms of assessment such as surveys are fairly old and outdated.However, there have been some teens who have expressed interest in the project to ValerieChism through word of mouth. We will suggest in the time line for the project that someassessment be taken early in the planning period.
  • IST 613 5Potential Benefits, Opportunities, Costs, and Risks to the Users ● Opportunities: ○ The opportunity to have a monthly activity ○ The opportunity to get new exposure to reading and libraries ○ The opportunity to improve relationships with library staff and with peers ○ The opportunity to find an enjoyment of new authors or genres ● Benefits: ○ Development of critical thinking and creativity ○ Better leadership skills ○ Increased enjoyment of reading for pleasure ○ Improved public speaking skills ○ New skills learned through the monthly activities ○ An additional activity to put on a college application or resume ● Costs: ○ Transportation ○ Additional reading on top of normal schoolwork ○ Decreased free time due to meetings and additional reading or planning ○ Boundaries of comfort zone pushed from leadership and public speaking responsibilities ● Risks: ○ Lack of peer support may cause feelings of disconnect from friends ○ Complaints from other users of the library may make teens feel unwelcome ○ Inconsistent or limited attendance could force the club to shut down prematurely ○ Committing to an activity that later makes them feel overwhelmed ○ Being perceived as “smart” may lead to rejection by peers.Estimated Demand for Service Though there have been expressions of interest for book clubs, the library has not beensuccessful in getting any started and maintained. There has been some interest expressed morerecently in a less formal matter, but excitement also wanes fairly quickly. With these facts inmind, Valerie Chism believes six to eight teens is a reasonable expectation for attendance at thestart up of the club. Since a major problem in the past has been maintaining interest andattendance, setting an initial goal of one year with a similarly sized group seems realistic.Relevant Literature At the start of the planning process, one must remember: “[P]rograms should be as variedas the interests of the young adults” (New York Library Association, 1984, p. 13). The literaturesupports a process that begins with research of the basics such as space and staff, then adds theinput of teens, and culminates with a flexible creativity to best develop the program. First, the library must conduct research to determine which options best suit their userneeds. This research can look at the library’s own staff, time, (Vaillancourt, 2000, p. 26) budget(Jones et al., 2004, p 235) and space (Kunzel & Hardesty, 2006, p. 6) to determine where tobegin. Once the library has determined their existing strengths and weaknesses, they can begin
  • IST 613 6to decide what specifics for the club would be best for them and their community, givingthemselves as many options as possible at first (Jones et al., 2004, p. 228). Options include: willthe club all read the same book or will the teens each pick their own book and find connectinggenres or themes to discuss (Jones et al., p. 227); in what way will the room be set up (Brady,1985, p. 150); how much control will the teens have (Kunzel & Hardesty, 2006, p. 6); and whattype of behind the scenes support the club will require of the library staff (Kunzel & Hardesty,2006, p. 6). After the various options are determined, the library should outline the specificmethods of their program and set clear goals for themselves with steps they can clearly measureand set dates for each (Vaillancourt, 2000, p. 25). It is important to have these objectivesoutlined so that the library can look back and have a clear means of assessing the program lateron. Once the general research is done, teen input is an invaluable tool for building upon thegeneral data for a more successful program. Allowing teens to participate in the planningprocess, through aspects such as book selection, makes the experience more personal for them(NYLA, 1984, p. 13; Scharber, Melrose, & Wurl, 2009, p. 187). The library should considerincorporating the teens who have shown interest in such a program into the planning process,possibly selecting one of these teens to take the lead and guide activities and discussion (Jones etal., 2004, p. 227; Scharber et al., 2009, p. 187). Having a teen leader may be more appropriateand beneficial for the program then a librarian taking complete control (Kunzel & Hardesty,2006, p. 6). The more participation and inclusion teens feel helps to spread awareness for andgrow the program (Scharber et al., 2009, p. 187). The library must be open and willing to listento the input of the teens, so there is a better understanding of what they are interested in doingand getting out of their experience (Jones et al., 2004, p. 234). Once the basics have been established, it is time for the planning process to becomecreative. One must remain flexible in their planning in order to permit for the free flow ofcreativity, allowing for the needs and wants of the teens to better meet (Kunzel & Hardesty,2006, p. 5). Hall (2007, p. 33) suggests that once the list of reading material has beendetermined take the time to brainstorm ideas for book related activities. This activities couldinclude such programs as: crafts, movie showings, field trips, etc (Hall, 2007, pp. 33-34). Alongwith planning creative programs, the moderator must be flexible in the role that they play inleading others. They must be willing to adjust their own role to nudge, support, instruct, orintervene as needed in the program (Kunzel & Hardesty, 2006, p. 6). Regardless of the options that arise, it is important to keep the planning process short inorder to maintain enthusiasm and to start with a structured plan that can be changed to fit theneeds of the club (Scharber et al., 2009, p. 187). Careful planning and attention to the needs ofthe library’s own community are two factors necessary for success of any program. For a teenbook club though, the input of the actual teens the club would serve and the ability for the libraryto be both flexible and creative in meeting the needs of those teens are of the highest priority. Inthe end, the club should serve to be both informational and recreational in order to best serve theteens it was created for (NYLA, 1984, p. 13).
  • IST 613 7Recommendations for ActionGoals and Outcomes Goals Outcomes Engage teens in the library environment Increase in the number of young adult materials circulated within the year Create a fun, relaxed, safe space Increase use of the library’s teen space by teens Allow the club to be teen led Each month there is a different Teen Leader that leads the meeting’s discussion and activity More than 25% of the teens volunteer at some point within the course of the year Encourage critical thinking and creativity By the end of the first quarter, 25% of the teens actively contribute to the discussion topics during monthly meetings At least every other month the club will supplement discussion with a creative activity, developed by the teens in cooperation with Val Create sustainability for the club and Maintain an attendance of at least bring in a new flow of students six or more teens at each meeting for the year Each member recruits at least one friend to join the club by the end of the year Encourage participation in both a face-to- In addition to the monthly face and online environment meetings, an online discussion forum via Facebook will allow teens to continue discussions on their own time.
  • IST 613 8Monthly Budget Expense Cost Notes Books $50 The plan is to purchase paperback copies of the books for each teen. Additional copies may be found through inter-library loans Refreshments $20 Administrative Costs $100 Room, utilities, etc. Library Personnel $100 Time spent to read the book, time spent at monthly meeting and at mid-month meeting Marketing $35 Reprinting of any necessary marketing materials, time spent by staff reprinting and redistributing those materials Items for activity $0-$20 These costs will be determined month by (optional) month in meetings with the Teen Leader Total Minimum of $305- $325/month ($3660-3900/year)Responsible Parties Valerie Chism: Young Adult Services Librarian o Arranging for and facilitating meetings o Marketing o Develop discussion and/or activity of the month’s meeting o Purchasing books, refreshment, materials for activities, etc. o Selection of next month’s book o Assessment of teens after the meeting Teen Liaison o Communicate concerns and issues of teens with Valerie o Informal assessment of teens throughout the year o Marketing Teen Leader o Meet with Valerie mid-way through the month o Develop and lead discussion and/or activity of the month’s meeting Teen Members o Come to and participate in monthly meetings o Select Teen Liaison and monthly Teen Leader
  • IST 613 9 o Select books Custodial Staff o Set up and straighten up the roomAction Plan and Timeline May 2011 o This project will begin in May 2011. A majority of this month will be spent doing an informal assessment of the current teen users of the library and marketing the program. Marketing should take place at the library, in local schools, and within the community o The first meeting for the club will be held on the last Thursday of the month from 4 to 5 PM. This meeting will be a discussion of what the teens are interested in getting out of the club, what they want to read, and how they want the meetings to be run. A Teen Liaison for the club should be selected, as well as a Teen Lead for next month’s meeting. Book selection for the next two months should be determined so the books can be ordered. This will allow for the July book to be distributed during the June meeting. Task Timeline Responsible Party/Parties Assessment of teen users May 1-25 Valerie Chism (Val) Marketing May 1-25 Val Reserve room May 1 Val First Teen Book Club May 26, 4-5 PM Val meeting Chose Teen Liaison May 26 Val, teen members Chose Teen Leader May 26 Val, teen members Determine book for next two May 26 Val, teen members months Decide on general meeting May 26 Val, teen members time Purchase book for June May 27 Val meeting Distribute June book As soon as it comes in Val June 2011 - June 2012 o This program will benefit by following a year long cycle. At the end of the year, it will be important to assess the program in full, making adjustments for the next
  • IST 613 10 year. The Teen Liaison will play a vital role in helping in the assessment of the program during this entire time period. o A monthly timeline can be followed for each month of the program. With in the beginning of the month the next month’s book needs to be ordered, marketing materials updated, room reserved, and book read. In the middle of the month Val should have a meeting with that month’s Teen Leader. Together they will determine the discussion topics and possible activities for the month’s meeting. The week of the meeting refreshments and any needed materials for the activity should be purchased. The room should also be set up prior to the meeting. o During the monthly meeting, details for upcoming meetings should be determined. The next month’s Teen Leader and a book for the meeting in two months should be chosen. The book for the following month should be distributed to the teen members. Finally, an informal assessment of the teen members feelings and feedback should take place before leaving the meeting. The Teen Liaison will then continue to make informal assessments throughout the month. Task Timeline Responsible Party/Parties Order book for next month First day of the month Valerie Chism (Val) Marketing Beginning of and Val, Teen Liaison throughout the month Read book for this month Beginning of and Val, teen members throughout the month Reserve room Beginning of the month Val Teen Leader meeting Middle of the month Val, Teen Leader Determine discussion and/or Middle of the month Val, Teen Leader activity (during Teen Leader meeting) Purchase food and materials Within the week of the Val for activity club meeting Initial set up the room Day of the club meeting Custodial Staff Club meeting Last Thursday of the Val, teen members month (time to be determined during May meeting) Select next Teen Leader During club meeting Teen members Select book for meeting in During club meeting Teen members, Val two months Distribute next months book During club meeting Val Informal assessment After the meeting Val, Teen Liaison
  • IST 613 11Pilot-Test We do not feel that a pilot-test is appropriate for this project.Scalability The initial goal is to have six to eight teens. Through marketing efforts and word of mouth,we hope to increase that number throughout the year. After maintaining the club for a few yearsand building those numbers, the library hopes to be able to host a larger event modeled afterRochester’s Teen Book Festival, a day long event which brings authors and teens together tocelebrate reading.SWOT Strengths Weaknesses Dedicated Young Adult Librarian Other librarians hesitant toward Small community (close teens proximity, community center, etc) Limited availability of books in Room with kitchen space and the system technological equipment Limited space Teen Liaison Lack of funding Opportunities Threats Relationship with schools Over-programmed/Program- Offering exciting activities phobic users Increased teen involvement (in the Lack of interest library/community) Unable to attract new students Developing skills through once the current group graduates activities Lack of transportationLimitations and Assumptions Limitations o Low attendance of teens o Unavailable books o Tight budget o Limited space o Limited availability of time Assumptions o Teens will be interested in the club o Teens will be interested in being leaders o Teens will be willing to provide input during initial meeting and feedback throughout
  • IST 613 12 Works CitedBaldwinsville Public Library Board of Trustees. (1998). 1998 - 2000 Mission Statement and Long Range Plan. Retrieved from http://www.bville.lib.ny.us/mission.htmBrady, J. (1985). Programming for young adult. In A. Gagnon & A. Gagnon (Ed.), Meeting the challenge: Library Services to Young Adults (pp. 147-152). Ottawa, Ontario: Canadian Library Association.Hall, S. (2007). How I learned to run a really popular book club (and what I learned about its effect on students reading skills and attitude). Teacher Librarian, 35(1), 32-36. Retrieved from Research Library. (Document ID: 1379474741).Jones, P., Gorman, M., & Suellentrop, T. (2004). Connecting young adults and libraries (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.Kunzel, B., & Hardesty, C. (2006). The teen-centered book club: Readers to leaders. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?id=qjPlMTfGxWoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Tee n-Centered+Book+Club&source=bl&ots=5LzYMnI1SS&sig=PPv5ClGaF7NpJZLYcEQ- pdvieAc&hl=en&ei=OyVcTZXEMZCdgQe6lZXwDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=resul t&resnum=4&ved=0CDQQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=falseNew York Library Association. (1984). Standards for youth services in public libraries of New York State. New York: New York Library Association.Scharber, C. (2009). Online book clubs: Bridges between old and new literacies practices. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 52(5), 433-437. doi:10.1598/JAAL52.5.7Scharber, C. M., Melrose, A., & Wurl, J. (2009). Online book clubs for preteens and teens. Library Review, 58(3), 176-195. Retrieved from Research Library. (Document ID: 1858574591).Vaillancourt, R.J. (2000). Bare bones young adult services: Tips for public library generalists. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.
  • IST 613 13 Marketing PlanIntroduction It is not enough to simply plan and start a book club. With out people to attend theprogram it will quickly become an unsuccessful attempt and a loss for the library. Therefore it isimperative to the success of any program to have a marketing plan in place to promote theprogram to the public. However, it is not simply about putting the word out on your program, itis important to have a specific target audience to focus your marketing on so that creativematerials can be developed to catch their attention. The “Hit the Books” club will focus its marketing efforts on teenagers in 10 through 12grade at Baldwinsville’s Baker High School. A key to making this a successful marketing planwill be the placement of relevant materials in both the library and school settings. Marketingmaterials will begin with print items, such as flyers and bookmarks, as well as a group Facebookpage. From there, additional materials may be added and updates made to initial materials asneeded. It will be important to the success of the “Hit the Books” club to make sure the programis marketed to the right audiences in the right settings.Relevant Literature No program will even get off the ground without some level of promotion, let alonesucceed. Although libraries usually have a small, if any, budget for marketing, it is important tofind ways of getting information about the program out to the teens (Jones et al., 2004, p. 261).For teen book clubs, this requires a lot of awareness of and attention to the target audience.Every community has a unique group of teens and the library must be aware of those uniqueaspects in order to get the most out of their marketing. The literature offers several wayslibraries have attempted to do this. First there are the basic methods of advertisement that have proven to be tried and true.Many libraries have utilized quick blurbs in newspapers. For example, an ad printed in theAsbury Park Press (2011) for the Middletown Public Library of New Jersey reads: Teen Book Club at the Middletown Public Library, 2/13 from 2-3 in the teen zone. This group will meet the 2nd and 4th Sunday of each month. For the first meeting on 2/13, bring a bok [sic] youve already read to discuss with the group. Other standard methods of marketing used by libraries include flyers and posts to thelibrary’s website (Jones et al., 2004, pp. 262-263). As steady as these methods may be, librariansmay get stuck on them and not explore other options that may be more suitable for drawing theattention of teens (Jones et al., 2004, p. 263). In order to appeal to teens, “messages need to be very verbal and very visible” (Jones etal., 2004, p. 262). This is a factor that flyers, websites, and newspaper ads may not always beable to meet. In order to supplement these forms of marketing, librarians can borrow methodsfrom other businesses when they are pushing something new. The staff should stay excitedabout the program throughout and share their excitement with teens who visit the library or,while helping teens, librarians can develop an “add on” phrase like retail stores may use (Jones etal., 2004, p. 262). Additionally, marketing is another step within the process of developing a
  • IST 613 14program in which utilizing input from teenagers could be invaluable (Jones et al., 2004, p. 263).Asking a teen to help with the design and layout for an advertisement could bring an elementinto the process that may escape many librarians on their own (Jones et al., 2004, p. 262). Andnever underestimate word of mouth (Jones et al., 2004, p. 262). Some other methods of marketing that may attract the attention of teens include:newspaper book reviews of teen books, billboards, ads in yearbooks or newsletters, cable accessTV, date due slips, e-mail lists for teens, team up with a fast food restaurant, raffles, posters andbookmarks, reading lists, customer loyalty programs, mailing lists, mouse pads, parades, bus ads,school visits, student ambassadors, and many more. (Jones et al., 2004, p. 263-268). Using methods beyond print may also be a beneficial way to attract teens to the program,catching them while they are online, a common place for them. These methods include podcastsand advertisements on social networking sites (Scharber, Melrose, & Wurl, 2009, p. 187). Marketing is the link between the work that the library has done in planning a programand the teens who will utilize the program. It is most important while determining the methodsof advertisement that the library will use to keep in mind who the program is for. If theadvertisement fails to attract the attention of teens or does not show up in areas they frequent,they will also fail to do any promotion for the book club.
  • IST 613 15Marketing Goals and OutcomesGoals OutcomesEncourage teens to attend this new program ● At least 4 inquires about the club per week during May 2011 ● Initial attendance of at least 6 teens
  • IST 613 16Provide a steady attendance for the club ● Have at least 6 teens at each monthly meeting for a year ● Teens are kept updated on what is planned for upcoming meetingsEncourage new teens to join the club ● After the initial year there will be at least 5 new members ● Each member brings at least one friend to the club with them at least onceEmphasize to teens the aspects of the club ● Teens not typically interested in readingbeyond simply “reading” join for the opportunity to take a leadership role, socialize with other members, and participate in activitiesCreate an Internet awareness for the club ● Initially have at least six teens following the Facebook page ● Teen followers post on the Facebook page at least once a monthTarget AudienceUsers 10th/11th Grade 10th/11th Grade 12th Grade 12th Grade Readers Non-Readers Readers Non-ReadersDemographics -15-17 years old -15-17 years old -17-18 years old -17-18 years old -Predominately -Predominately -Predominately -Predominately English speaking English speaking English speaking English speaking Caucasians Caucasians Caucasians Caucasians
  • IST 613 17Lifestyle -Students -Students -Students -Students -Possible part time -Possible part -Possible part -Possible part jobs time jobs time jobs time jobs -After school -After school -After school -After school activities activities activities activities -Socializing with -Socializing with -Socializing with -Socializing with friends friends friends friends -Dating -Dating -Dating -Dating -Deciding on -Deciding on post-graduation post-graduation plans plansLibrary Usage -Minimal -Rare -Minimal -Rare -Use for both -Use only for -Use for both -Use only for pleasure and academics pleasure and academics academics academicsInformation -Homework -Homework -Homework -HomeworkNeeds -Study space -Study space -Study space -Study space -Materials for -Materials for -Materials for pleasure reading pleasure reading SAT and college -Materials for application help SAT and college application helpCommunication -Instant -Instant -Instant -InstantPreferences messaging messaging messaging messaging -Test messaging -Test messaging -Test messaging -Test messaging -Facebook and -Facebook and -Facebook and -Facebook and Twitter Twitter Twitter Twitter -E-mail -E-mail -E-mail -E-mailCompeting -After school -After school -After school -After schoolService activities activities activities activitiesAlternatives -Part time jobs -Part time jobs -Part time jobs -Part time jobs -Socializing -Socializing -Socializing -SocializingPositioning Statement The “Hit the Books” teen book club will provide Baldwinsville teens with theopportunities not only to experience reading in a social setting, but to expand their skills incritical thinking, creativity, and leadership. By leaving many of the decisions in the hands of theteens, this forum will provide a place for them to feel a sense of control and ownership, not oftenoffered to them. By providing the teens with the opportunity to be hands on in the library, thebook club will also serve to create lifelong library habits and users. Parents and teachers willbenefit from seeing their children/students succeed in new areas of development.
  • IST 613 18Key Messages ● 10th/11th Grade Reader: Get together with your friends to discover new books and activities! ● 10th/11th Grade Non-Reader: Discover the social side of reading! ● 12th Grade Reader: Discover new books and get the opportunity to take charge of your book club! ● 12th Grade Non-Reader: Looking to have the chance to take charge and boost your college applications? Try the book club! ● Other Librarians: See new lifelong users develop! ● Parents: Watch your kids develop new skills to succeed!Message Delivery Strategies ● Tools: ○ Word of Mouth: Promotion of the club through teens talking to peers, teachers talking to students, and library staff talking to teen users. ○ Boxing Glove Keychains: Keychains to be distributed to club members with miniature boxing gloves imprinted with the club logo. ○ Newspaper Ad: Informative blurb to be printed in the Baldwinsville Messenger to inform the public about the start up of the club. ○ Fliers: Eye-catching fliers to be posted in the library’s teen area and circulation desk, as well as around the high school. ○ Facebook Page: An online informative page on a social media site already used by many teens that will give further details about the club and opportunities for the teens to get involved. ○ Traditional Bookmarks: Imprinted with informative designs (graphics provided) and left in the open for the teens to pick up in the library’s teen area and at the circulation desk. ○ Magnetic Bookmarks: Imprinted with the club’s logo and distributed to club members with their books. ○ Water Bottles: Imprinted with the club’s logo and distributed to club members. ○ USB Bands: USB wristbands imprinted with the club’s logo and distributed to club members. ○ T-shirts: Imprinted with the club’s logo and distributed to club members. ● Action Plan & Timeline ○ May 2011 ○ This will be the initial month of Marketing for the “Hit the Books” club. Initial marketing material will include: Fliers, bookmarks, group Facebook page and a news release in the Baldwinsville Messenger. Once those materials have been developed, they will need to be placed both in the Library and the High School. It
  • IST 613 19 is encouraged that the Librarian go personally to the High School and talk to students. ○ Due to production time estimated from Janway.com taking up to five weeks, it is suggested that personalized items, especially the boxing glove keychains, are ordered in the beginning of May.Task Timeline Responsible Party(ies)Order boxing glove keychains May 1 ValProduce initial marketing May 1 - 8 Valmaterials (flyers andbookmarks)Write, send, and print May 1-8 Valnewspaper ads for BaldwinsvilleMessengerCreate a Facebook page for the May 1 - 8 ValprogramDistribute marketing materials May 9 - 26 Val, librarianswithin the library: teen space,circulation desk, etc.Distribute marketing materials May 9 - 13 Val, teachersat Baker High SchoolMake any needed updates May 27 Val, Teen Liaisonmarketing material for the nextmonth’s meeting ○ June 2011 - 2012 ○ For the subsequent months, it will be important to update any necessary marketing material, such as fliers and the Facebook page. Updates to the fliers should happen as soon as possible after the monthly meeting. The Facebook page should be updated as often as necessary to reflect the most recent updates, including topics of discussion or activities as they are decided during the mid- month meeting (see the Project Plan).
  • IST 613 20 ○ At the beginning of the month it will also be necessary to develop and order any additional marketing items, such as the boxing glove chains, water bottles, etc. This will allow time for the product to be produced and delivered. These additional marketing materials will be used in the months to come to further promotion of the club.Task Timeline Responsible Party(ies)Make needed updates to flyers Beginning of the month Val, Teen Liaisonand redistributeMake needed updates to Beginning and through out the Teen LiaisonFacebook page monthDiscuss new and improved Beginning of the month Val, Teen Liaisonmarketing materialsOrder additional marketing Beginning of the month Valmaterials from outside vendor ● Budget ○ The designs for the materials have already been created, therefore no additional time or resources are necessary for the creation of the marketing designs. ○ The initial marketing plan only includes materials to be used in bulk for the general public while the additional marketing plan includes materials to be distributed to members of the club to help maintain and grow attendance.Initial Marketing ToolsExpense Cost NotesTime $20 Pay for time spent for production and distribution of materials by the library staff
  • IST 613 21Flyers $20 75 to be hung around the library and in the high school. Materials required: ● color and black ink ● paperBookmarks $25 100 to be left in the Teen Space of the library Materials required: ● color and black ink ● card stockBoxing Glove $345.00 ($1.15 Pricing from Garrettspecialties.com for a minimum bulkKeychains per keychain) order of 300 keychainsNewspaper Ad $25 Ad in the Baldwinsville MessengerTotal for May $90 + cost of Keychains are optional, though suggested, and pricing keychains ($435) may be flexible depending on the sourceAdditional Marketing Tools ● These tools are options for additional marketing materials that could help promote peer to peer marketing. These are not meant to be purchased all at once, but as interest for them arises. Pricing found was based on the minimum option for bulk order.Expense Cost NotesMagnetic Bookmarks $162.50 ($.65 per bookmark) Pricing from Janway.com for a bulk order of 250 bookmarksUSB Memory Bands $335.50 ($6.70 per band) Pricing from Janway.com for a bulk order of 50 bands at 512 MBWater Bottles $294.00 ($.98 per bottle) Pricing from Janway.com for a bulk order of 300 bottlesT-shirts $198.00 ($5.50 per shirt) Pricing from Janway.com for a bulk order of 36 adult sized white t-shirts ● Responsible Parties ○ Valerie Chism (Young Adult Service Librarian): As the young adult librarian Val has access to the tools of library. Additionally, Val has connections to the high schools and local teens through her position and has already formed some relationships with both. ■Produce initial marketing materials
  • IST 613 22 ■Create and monitor group Facebook page ■Get Press Release printed in the Baldwinsville Messenger ■Order additional marketing materials from an outside vendor ■Set up marketing material in the teen space at the library ■Promote the program at Baker High School ■Update marketing materials for future months ■Help to develop additional marketing material ○ Teen Liaison: Has existing relationships with other teens and a working relationship with Val ■Help to develop additional marketing material ■Update the group Facebook page ○ Librarians: Have access to a variety of locations within the library and are aware of the areas of highest traffic. ■Place marketing material through out the library ○ Teachers: Have existing relationships with the teens and may already have a working relationship with Val. ■Allow Val to come into the school and promote the programMockups of Selected Marketing Methods Logo: for general marketing and additional items (keychains, water bottles, t-shirts, USB bands, and magnetic bookmarks)
  • IST 613 23 Newspaper Ad
  • IST 613 24 Traditional Bookmarks
  • IST 613 25 Flyers
  • IST 613 26
  • IST 613 27
  • IST 613 28 Works CitedAsbury Park Press. (2011). Teen book club at the Middletown Public Library. Retrieved from http://www.app.com/article/20110202/GETPUBLISHED/102020357/Teen-Book-Club- Middletown-Public-LibraryGarrett Specialities (1998-2010). Garrett Specialties: A promotional product comapny. Retrieved from http://www.garrettspecialties.com/boxing-glove-keychain-p-12227.htmlJanWay Company (2011). Librarians’ #1 Choice Custom Printed Fundraising and Promotional Items. Retrieved from http://173.163.132.77/index.aspJones, P., Gorman, M., & Suellentrop, T. (2004). Connecting young adults and libraries (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.Scharber, C. M., Melrose, A., & Wurl, J. (2009). Online book clubs for preteens and teens. Library Review, 58(3), 176-195. Retrieved from Research Library. (Document ID: 1858574591).
  • IST 613 29 Assessment PlanIntroduction It is not enough to simply run a program, your stakeholders want to make sure that theprogram is of actual worth. Therefore, assessment of the program, to see whether it is achievingits goals or not, is vital to the programs continuation. When dealing with teens, assessment may become a bit difficult. One may find thatsurveys may not be your best choice because teens are very unlikely to take them seriously.Therefore, to assess the outcomes of the Hit the Books! Teen Book Club, we have recommendeda combination of observation methods and recording of data.Goals of the Service ● Engage teens in the library environment ● Create a fun, relaxed, safe place ● Allow the club to be teen led ● Encourage critical thinking and creativity ● Create sustainability for the club and bring in a new flow of students ● Encourage participation in both a face-to-face and online environmentOutcomes of the Service (In order of priority) ● Maintain an attendance of at least six or more teens at each meeting for the year ● By the end of the first quarter, 25% of the teens actively contribute to the discussion topics during monthly meetings ● Each month there is a different Teen Leader that leads the meeting’s discussion and activity ● More than 25% of the teens volunteer to be the Teen Leader at some point within the course of the year ● Each member recruits at least one friend to join the club by the end of the year ● Increase use of the library’s young adult space by teens ● At least every other month the club will supplement discussion with a creative activity, developed by the teens in cooperation with Val ● Increase in the number of young adult materials circulated within the year ● In addition to the monthly meetings, an online discussion forum via Facebook will allow teens to continue discussions on their own time.Relevant Literature Once a program has begun, it is time to start assessing and evaluating the impact theprogram is having on the users. “Assessment is gathering information...; evaluation is using thatinformation to make judgements” (Asselin, 2003, p. 52). It is important that this gathering ofinformation is an ongoing process (Vaillancourt, 2000, p. 28) that can be collected during everyinteraction (Asselin, 2003, p. 53). Once this information has been collected it should be used tomake improvements to the program (Asselin, 2003, p. 52).
  • IST 613 30 The literature suggests using multiple forms of assessment (Asselin, 2003, p. 53). Formscan range from formal to informal; including such techniques as note taking (Vaillancourt, 2000,p. 26), reviewing attendance, questionnaires (Brady, 1985, p. 151), informal interviews,eavesdropping and the reading of body language (Jones et al., 2004, p. 241). These assessmentsshould be done by the personnel whom is responsible for the implementation and improvementof the program (Brady, 1985, p. 151). If an informal interview is chosen to gain information there are a few things to consider.First, try not to interview the teens that are familiar to the library staff. It is best to obtain theinsight of less frequent users, so the program can be improved to benefit the non-user. Second,make sure that questions are established beforehand, however, feed off or the teens answers todetermine further questions. Finally, it is important that the person asking the questions remainsrelaxed in order to make a relaxed environment for the teen to respond. (Jones et al., 2004, p.241) If a questionnaire format is chosen instead, there are some things to consider. Use amixture of open ended and close-ended questions. Make sure there are a variety of optionsavailable, or space available for suggestions. Be aware of the length, if it becomes too long theteens will lose interest. (Jones et al., 2004, p. 240) Before making changes to the program the library should consider that they should notsolely rely on the information that has been obtained from the users. No one likes to take longsurveys, or be asked numerous questions at one time. A desire to just finish may cause answersto be “silly” and not helpful for the assessment. Another concern with surveys is that there is thepossibility that the right questions were not asked, therefore making it difficult to get the help inevaluation. (Jones et al., 2004, p. 240) As mentioned in the planning section of this literature review, it is important to get theteens involved from the beginning. It is just as important to hear directly from them in theassessment and evaluation of the program (Vaillancourt, 2000, p. 26). Therefore, the library willfind that in order to have a successful program for teens, it is important to give them the lastword (Hall, 2007, p. 35).
  • IST 613 31Assessment Plans Per Outcome Outcome 1Outcome: Maintain an attendance of at least six or more teens at each meeting for the yearTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Attendance records will be kept during each meetingEvidence CollectionRecommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & There is no alternative for this method of assessmentToolsAnalysis of Evidence The number of teens in attendance at each monthly meeting will(Data Plan) be recorded and charted over the course of the yearHow Assessors Will There will be at least six teens in attendance at each meeting overKnow the Outcome Has the course of the year.Been MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if there are more than sixDecision Making teens in attendance at each meeting over the course of theIndicators year. This will indicate that the club has developed sustainability. ● The outcome will not have been met if less than six teens are in attendance at each meeting. This will indicate that marketing methods need to be increased and that a conversation needs to be held between the teens and Val or the Teen Liaison to determine what changes are necessary. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if more than eight teens are in attendance at each meeting. This may indicate that less marketing is necessary for the next month and that re-evaluation of materials needed for following meetings needs to be done.Recommendations for A formal report including a graph representing the attendance forReporting the meetings to be available to the board of trusteesResponsible Parties Val will be responsible for recording meeting attendance and analyzing and charting the data
  • IST 613 32Timeline ● Every month, Val will record the number of teens in attendance at the meetings. ● At the end of the year, Val will analyze the numbers for signs of sustainability and chart the results. Outcome 2Outcome: By the end of the first quarter, 25% of the teens actively contribute to the discussion topics during monthly meetingsTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for A tally will be kept on the attendance record of the number ofEvidence Collection times each teen participates in the discussion.Recommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & ● Survey completed at the end of the quarter asking teensTools how much they felt they contributed to the monthly topics of discussion.Analysis of Evidence A tally of each teens participation on the discussion topics will be(Data Plan) recorded and analyzed every quarterHow Assessors Will At least 25% of the teens are observed as actively engaged in theKnow the Outcome Has discussion topic by the end of the first quarter.Been MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if at least 25% of theDecision Making teens are observed as actively engaged in the discussionIndicators topics by the end of the first quarter. This will indicate an improvement in critical thinking and creativity on the part of the teens. ● The outcome will not have been met if less than 25% of the teens are observed as actively engaged in the discussion topics by the end of the first quarter. This will indicate that a conversation needs to be held between Val and the teens or the teen liaison and the teens to determine what changes need to be made. This may also indicate that some teens need additional encouragement to contribute.
  • IST 613 33Recommendations for A formal report including a graph representing the number ofReporting teens participating in discussion topics to be available to the board of trusteesResponsible Parties Val will be responsible for keeping a tally of the teens’ participation in discussion topics during meetings and analyzing the data quarterly.Timeline ● Every month, Val will observe and tally how often each teen in attendance participates in the discussion. ● Every quarter, Val will analyze the numbers for signs of increased use and chart the results. Outcome 3Outcome: Each month there is a different Teen Leader that leads the meeting’s discussion and activityTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Meeting Minutes will be recorded by Val or a teen memberEvidence Collection designated for the task at each meeting with a notation of who is leading discussion during that month’s meetingRecommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & General observation by Val of different teens showing interest inTools being the Teen LeaderAnalysis of Evidence A record of the Teen Leaders will be kept in the monthly Meeting(Data Plan) Minutes to be compiled into a report at the end of the year.How Assessors Will There will be a Teen Leader for each monthly meeting.Know the Outcome HasBeen MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if every month over theDecision Making course of the year there is a Teen Leader for the meeting.Indicators This indicates the teens are in control within club. ● The outcome will not have been met if more then two months go by with out a Teen Leader. This indicates that there needs to be increased effort by Val to encourage teens to take the lead.
  • IST 613 34 ● The outcome will have been exceeded if teens begin to compete for the leadership role. This indicates that a voting method may need to be put in place.Recommendations for A formal report to be available to the board of trusteesReportingResponsible Parties Val will be responsible for keeping Meeting Minutes that include a record of who is the Teen Leader for the month.Timeline ● Every month, Val will record the Teen Leader in the monthly Meeting Minutes ● At the end of the year, Val will compile a list of Teen Leaders for the year. Outcome 4Outcome: More than 25% of the teens volunteer to be the Teen Leader at some point within the course of the yearTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for See Outcome 3Evidence CollectionRecommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & General observation by Val of different teens showing interest inTools being the Teen LeaderAnalysis of Evidence See Outcome 3(Data Plan)How Assessors Will At least 25% of the members of the club will have volunteered atKnow the Outcome Has some point to be the Teen LeaderBeen MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if 25% of the teensDecision Making volunteer to be the Teen Leader at some point over theIndicators course of the year. This indicates the teens have a sense of control within the club.
  • IST 613 35 ● The outcome will not have been met if less than 25% of the teens volunteer to be the Teen Leader at some point over the course of the year. This indicates that there needs to be increased effort by Val to encourage the teens to take the lead. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if 100% of the teens volunteer to be the Teen Leader at some point over the course of the year. This may indicate a need for the development of an advanced monthly schedule of Teen Leaders.Recommendations for See Outcome 3ReportingResponsible Parties See Outcome 3Timeline See Outcome 3 Outcome 5Outcome: Each member recruits at least one friend to join the club by the end of the yearTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Attendance records will be kept during each meeting with specialEvidence Collection notation for members bringing a friend.Recommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & There is no alternative for this method of assessmentToolsAnalysis of Evidence The number of friends in attendance at each monthly meeting(Data Plan) will be recorded and charted over the course of the year.How Assessors Will There is at least one friend in attendance per member over theKnow the Outcome Has course of the year.Been Met
  • IST 613 36Results Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if there is at least oneDecision Making friend in attendance per member over the course of theIndicators year. This will indicate that the club has developed sustainability. ● The outcome will not have been met if less than 50% of the members bring a friend. This will indicate a conversation needs to be held between the teens and Val or the Teen Liaison to determine what changes are necessary. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if every member brings more than one friend over the course of the year. This may indicate the need for the development of a second group.Recommendations for A formal report including a graph representing the number ofReporting friends in attendance for the meetings to be available to the board of trusteesResponsible Parties Val will be responsible for recording friends in the monthly meeting attendance and analyzing the dataTimeline ● Every month, Val will record the number of friends in attendance at the meetings. ● At the end of the year, Val will analyze the numbers for signs of sustainability and chart the results. Outcome 6Outcome: Increase use of the library’s young adult space by teensTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Observation and recording of the number of teens using the teenEvidence Collection space every week. This will be done by Val keeping a weekly tally from her desk, which is within the young adult space. In order to make sure the tally is consistent a head count will be performed at the same time every day.Recommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot Assessment
  • IST 613 37Alternative Methods & ● Surveys filled out by teens about how they use the youngTools adult space ● Informal talks with teens in the libraryAnalysis of Evidence The number of teens using the young adult space on a weekly(Data Plan) basis will be recorded and charted over the course of the yearHow Assessors Will There will be at least a 5% increase in the weekly number ofKnow the Outcome Has teens in the young adult space of the library over the course ofBeen Met the yearResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if there is more than aDecision Making 5% increase in the number of teens observed using theIndicators young adult space. This will indicate that the book club has succeeded in encouraging further use of the young adult section of the library. ● The outcome will not have been met if there is less than a 5% increase in the number of teens observed using the young adult space. This will indicate a need within the book club for the library staff to actively encourage increased use of the young adult section of the library. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if there is more than a 20% increase in the number of teens observed using the young adult space. As there has already been some thought as to moving the teen space into the basement which is planned to undergo renovations, this may be used as further evidence of a need for a larger young adult space.Recommendations for A formal report including a graph representing the number ofReporting teens in the young adult space to be available to the Board of TrusteesResponsible Parties Val will be responsible for keeping a weekly account of teens in the young adult space and analyzing the data.Timeline ● Every week the tally of teens using the young adult space will be compiled and kept in a file. ● Every quarter, Val will analyze the numbers for signs of increased use and chart the results.
  • IST 613 38 Outcome 7Outcome: At least every other month the club will supplement discussion with a creative activity, developed by the teens in cooperation with ValTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Meeting Minutes will note if an activity has taken place duringEvidence Collection the monthly meeting that was developed in part by the teensRecommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & There is no alternative for this method of assessmentToolsAnalysis of Evidence Activities developed in part by the teens will be noted in Meeting(Data Plan) Minutes and compiled into a report at the end of the year.How Assessors Will At least six meetings have activities developed in part by theKnow the Outcome Has teens over the course of the year.Been MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if at least six meetingsDecision Making have activities over the course of the year developed inIndicators part by the teens. This will indicate that the teens are developing stronger skills in creativity. ● The outcome will not have been met if less than six meetings have activities over the course of the year developed in part by the teens. This will indicate that more needs to be done to stimulate the teens’ creative thinking within the club meetings and within the mid- month meetings Val has with monthly Teen Leaders. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if there is an activity for every meeting over the course of the year developed in part by the teens. This may indicate the need to set aside a second day in the month for just holding activities related to the monthly reading.Recommendations for A formal report including a compilation of the activitiesReporting developed in part by the teens to be available to the Board of Trustees.
  • IST 613 39Responsible Parties Val will be responsible for keeping the monthly Meeting Minutes that will include notation on the activities developed in part by the teensTimeline ● Every month, Val will take notes on the activities developed in part by the teens ● At the end of the year, Val will compile her notes on the activities into a formal report Outcome 8Outcome: Increase in the number of young adult materials circulated within the yearTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Circulation records of young adult materials from the circulationEvidence Collection desk will be collected weekly and analyzed each quarter for signs of increased circulation.Recommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & There is no alternative for this method of assessmentToolsAnalysis of Evidence The number of young adult materials circulated on a weekly(Data Plan) basis will be recorded and charted over the course of the year by the library staffHow Assessors Will There will be at least a 2% increase from last year in the weeklyKnow the Outcome Has number of young adult materials circulated over the course of theBeen Met yearResults Scenario & ● The outcome will have been met if there is more than aDecision Making 2% increase in the circulation of young adult materials.Indicators This will indicate that the book club has succeeded in encouraging further use of the young adult materials of the library. ● The outcome will not have been met if there is less than a 2% increase in the circulation of young adult materials. This will indicate a need within the book club for the library staff to actively encourage increased use of the
  • IST 613 40 young adult materials of the library. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if there is more than a 7% increase in the circulation of young adult materials. This will indicate the possible need for a discussion concerning an increase in the budget for collection development of young adults materials.Recommendations for A formal report including a graph representing the circulation ofReporting young adult materials to be available to the Board of Trustees at the end of the year.Responsible Parties ● Circulation records will be kept by the circulation staff ● Val Chism will be responsible for analyzing the circulation dataTimeline ● Every week the number of young adult materials circulated will be extracted from the circulation records and kept in a separate file. ● Every quarter, Val will analyze the numbers for signs of increased use and chart the results. Outcome 9Outcome: In addition to the monthly meetings, an online discussion forum via Facebook will allow teens to continue discussions on their own timeTarget Audience: Teens (10th/11th graders readers and non-readers, 12th grade readers and non-readers)Methods & Tools for Observation and monitoring of the wall posts and comments asEvidence Collection well as the number of teens following the Hit the Books! Facebook page by the Teen LiaisonRecommendations for No pilot test for this assessment is necessaryPilot AssessmentAlternative Methods & ● Record of the emails received from FacebookTools notifications from the Hit the Books! Facebook page ● Surveys asking the teens how often they use the the online forum and how useful and/or easy they find it ● Informal assessment through conversations between the teens and both Val and the Teen Liaison about the use of the Facebook page
  • IST 613 41Analysis of Evidence The number of wall posts, comments, and teen followers will be(Data Plan) recorded every month and graphed for analysis of its usefulness for the club each quarter.How Assessors Will There will be at least a 10% increase each quarter in the numberKnow the Outcome Has of posts on the Facebook pageBeen MetResults Scenario & ● The outcome will reach expectations if there is at least aDecision Making 10% increase each quarter in the number of posts on theIndicators Facebook page. This will indicate that the online forum is viable option for supplementing the monthly meetings of the book club. ● The outcome will fail to have met expectations if there is less than a 10% increase each quarter in the number of posts on the Facebook page. This will indicate that the online forum is not a viable option to supplement the monthly meetings of the book club and it may need to be scrapped. ● The outcome will exceed expectations if there is more than a 30% increase each quarter in the number of posts on the Facebook page. This may indicate that offering a separate online only club is a viable option.Recommendations for A formal report including a chart of the use of the Facebook pageReporting by the members of the teen book clubResponsible Parties ● The Teen Liaison will be responsible for keeping track of the information being posted on Facebook by fellow teens ● Val will be responsible for taking the raw data from the Teen Liaison and creating a chart for the Board of Trustees.Timeline ● Every month, the Teen Liaison will compile the number of posts on the Facebook page and the number of teens following the page. ● Every quarter, Val will take the raw data from the Teen Liaison and create a chart.
  • IST 613 42Timeline for Continuous AssessmentThe project period has been determined to be for the duration of a year. Each outcome will needto be assessed at the given time during each subsequent project period.Outcome: Assessment Period:Maintain an attendance of at least six or more teens at each meeting To be assessed at thefor the year end of each year.Each month there is a different Teen Leader that leads the To be assessed at themeeting’s discussion and activity end of each year.More than 25% of the teens volunteer to be the Teen Leader at To be assessed at thesome point within the course of the year end of each year.Each member recruits at least one friend to join the club by the end To be assessed at theof the year end of the year.Increase use of the library’s young adult space by teens To be assessed quarterly through out the year.At least every other month the club will supplement discussion with To be assessed at thea creative activity, developed by the teens in cooperation with Val end of the year.Increase in the number of young adult materials circulated within To be assessed quarterlythe year through out the year.In addition to the monthly meetings, an online discussion forum via To be assessed quarterlyFacebook will allow teens to continue discussions on their own through out the year.time
  • IST 613 43Impact RubricIndicators: Preliminary: Progressing: Exemplary: Data Source:Attendance Attendance of 6 Attendance of 7- Attendance of Attendance teens at each 8 teens at each more than 8 teen Records meeting meeting at each meetingParticipation At least 25% of At least 50% of 100% of the Attendance the teens the teens teens contribute Records, contribute to contribute to to meeting Meeting Minutes meeting meeting discussion discussion discussionLeadership At least 25% of 50% of the teens 100% of the Meeting Minutes the teens volunteer to be teens volunteer volunteer to be Teen Leader to be Teen Teen Leader each month Leader each each month monthCirculation of 2% increase in 5% increase in 7% increase in LibraryYoung Adult the number of the number of the number of CirculationMaterials young adult young adult young adult Records materials materials materials circulated per circulated per circulated per month month monthUse of the 5% increase in 10-15% increase 20% increase in Weekly TallyLibrary’s Teen the number of in the number of the number ofSpace teens counted in teens counted in teens counted in the teen space the teen space the teen space per week per week per weekOnline 10% increase of 20% increase in 30% increase in ObservationComponent the number of the number of the number of posts on and posts on and posts on and followers of the followers of the followers of the online forum per online forum per online forum per quarter quarter quarter
  • IST 613 44 Works CitedAsselin, M. (2003). Assessment issues and recommendations. Teacher Librarian. 30(5), 52-53. Retrieved from Research Library. (Document ID: 348079561)Brady, J. (1985). Programming for young adult. In A. Gagnon & A. Gagnon (Ed.), Meeting the challenge: Library Services to Young Adults (pp. 147-152). Ottawa, Ontario: Canadian Library Association.Hall, S. (2007). How I learned to run a really popular book club (and what I learned about its effect on students reading skills and attitude). Teacher Librarian, 35(1), 32-36. Retrieved from Research Library. (Document ID: 1379474741).Jones, P., Gorman, M., & Suellentrop, T. (2004). Connecting young adults and libraries (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.Vaillancourt, R.J. (2000). Bare bones young adult services: Tips for public library generalists. Chicago, IL: American Library Association.