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    Josephnicolino.webquest Josephnicolino.webquest Presentation Transcript

    • The War of 1812 Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade American History Designed by; Joseph A. Nicolino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page *1
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] “ Twenty-nine years after the end of the American Revolution, conflict between Great Britain and the young United States flared up again. War broke out for a variety of reasons, including Britain’s seizure of American ships, impressment of American sailors into the British navy and restriction of trade between the United States and France. In June 1812 James Madison became the first U.S. president to ask Congress to declare war. Fought in three theaters, the conflict ended with the Treaty of Ghent in 1815”. “ In one of its most memorable episodes, as British troops entered the capital to burn the White House and other government buildings, first lady Dolley Madison refused to evacuate the White House until a portrait of George Washington was rescued. The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the U.S. national anthem, are another important legacy of the War of 1812. They were penned by the amateur poet Francis Scott Key after he watched American forces withstand the British siege of Fort McHenry”. The main point of this WebQuest is to understand why the War of 1812 was fought and what it accomplished . For this project, your WebQuest group is a group of historians trying to understand the War of 1812, each of you will have a separate responsibility and role in creating a presentation that will teach the class about the War of 1812. 2*
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Your group will be presenting to the class a brief overview of the War of 1812, This will include a Multimedia Presentation (PowerPoint) to show the class along with an outline of the major facts of the War of 1812 for each student to study for the quiz that will be given on the subject the following class period.
      • Your PowerPoint and Outline should both have these major points addressed:
        • Name two of the Major acts of Parliament that lead to the Declaration of War by the United States of America.
        • Why was the War of 1812 fought?
        • Where was the War of 1812 fought?
        • Who were the Nations that fought during the War of 1812?
        • Why was the War of 1812 such an important war for the United States?
        • Explain three major battles of the War of 1812 (Other then the defeat in Washington D.C.).
        • Describe in detail what occurred during defeat in Washington D.C.
      • Your PowerPoint must include a minimum of six images, and remember, both your PowerPoint and outline much not include any full sentences. Give only the bulleted points on both. Your PowerPoint and outline will be almost identical, only the outline will have no images, just the bulleted points from the PowerPoint.
      Title
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • To accomplish the task of this WebQuest, follow these steps,
      • First, you will be divided into groups of three students.
      • Once your group has formed, watch the three minute introduction to the War of 1812 at < http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/ > .
      • Now, you will choose your role in completing the task.
      • Student 1: The Battle Analyst
      • Responsibility is to find and present these facts to the class and build bulleted points:
          • Where was the War of 1812 fought?
          • Who were the Nations that fought during the War of 1812?
          • Explain three major battles of the War of 1812 (Other then the defeat in Washington D.C.).
      • Student 2: The Political Analyst
      • Responsibility is to find and present these facts to the class and build bulleted points:
          • Name two of the Major acts of Parliament that lead to the Declaration of War by the United States of America.
          • Why was the War of 1812 fought?
          • Why was the War of 1812 such an important war for the United States?
      • Student 3: The Detailer
          • Responsibility is less presentation to the class, more creating of PowerPoint and Outline
          • Describe in detail what occurred during defeat in Washington D.C.
          • You are in charge of putting together the PowerPoint and Outline for the presentation and finding a minimum of six images that will assist your group mates in presenting their parts of the project to the class.
      • 4. Once you have chosen your role, it is your responsibility to fulfill the role to the best of your ability. Your will be graded individually and not as a group, so make sure even if your group members are slacking on there responsibilities you are prepared for yours.
    • The Process Resources Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • 5. The resources that your group will use to find the information for your presentation are,
        • http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/
        • http://www.history.com/topics/war-of-1812
        • http://americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/the-war-of-1812.aspx
        • http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/1812/
      • Feel free to explore any of these websites and their associated links to find the information needed to complete your part of the task.
      • If you use any outside websites for images and other items, be sure to put them in a References Slide in your PowerPoint and in a References Section in your outline for the class.
      • If you notice how Ohio plays a major role in the conflict and as a group include a slide in your presentation on Ohio’s role, your whole group will receive an extra credit point on this assignment.
    • Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] 3* CATEGORY Excellent 5 Good 4 Acceptable 3 Poor 2 Unacceptable 1 Presentation Well-rehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention. Rehearsed with fairly smooth delivery that holds audience attention most of the time. Delivery is acceptable and maintains the interest of the audience most of the time. Delivery not smooth, but able to maintain interest of the audience some of the time. Delivery not smooth and audience attention often lost. Organization Content is well organized using headings or bulleted lists to group related material. Uses headings or bulleted lists to organize, but contains minimal mistakes. Overall organization of topics appears logical for the most part. Content is logically organized, but has noticeable flaws that distract the audience. There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts. Content Covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good. Includes essential knowledge about the topic, but has a factual error. Includes essential information about the topic but there are 2-3 factual errors. Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. Mechanics No misspellings or grammatical errors. Three or Five misspellings and/or mechanical errors. Five to Six Misspellings and or grammatical errors. Seven to nine misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Ten or more errors in spelling or grammar. Attractiveness Makes excellent use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. to enhance the presentation. Makes good use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. to enhance to presentation. Attractive appearance, but is difficult to look at for extended periods of time. Makes use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. but occasionally these detract from the presentation content. Use of font, color, graphics, effects etc. but these often distract from the presentation content. Paragraphs on slides and not bullet points.
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Together your group will accomplish a good presentation to help your fellow students learn and understand the War of 1812. Remember, you must use the websites given as resources for your presentation, but you can also branch out and find your own resources if needed. Your in class presentation will be graded individually, but the group contribution as a whole will be graded using the rubric, but if one section is missing because your other group member did not do their part it will not affect your grade. Hopefully you are able to use this WebQuest to explore the War of 1812 in more detail and get a deeper understanding of why the war was fought and what it accomplished, because it was a significant war in American History, even though many people forget it even occurred.
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] 1. Cannon Image, < http://www.eurotrader1.com/miniatures.htm >. 2. The History Chanel Website, < http://www.history.com/topics/war-of-1812 >. 3. Rubric Created using Rubistar, < http://rubistar4teachers.org/ >. 4. PBS, The War of 1812, < http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/ >. 5. The Smithsonian Website on the War of 1812, < http://americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/the-war-of-1812.aspx >. 6. Web Guides, The War of 1812, < http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/1812/ >. 7. PowerPoint Retrieved from Springboard, < http://springboard.uakron.edu >. 8. Wikispaces.com, < http://wikispaces.com >. 9. Joseph Nicolino’s Wiki, < https://jnicolino.wikispaces.com/ >. The Template and Training Materials for this WebQuest comes from, The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group
    • The War of 1812 (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Standards Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10th Grade American History Designed by Joseph A. Nicolino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page *1
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Standards Credits Teacher Page
      • Text Types and Purposes
      • 1. Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
      • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
      • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
      • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
      • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
      • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.
      • 2. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.
      • Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
      • Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
      • Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.
      • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.
      • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
      • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).
    • Curriculum Standards Continued (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Standards Credits Teacher Page
      • Production and Distribution of Writing
      • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
      • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
      • Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
      • Research to Build and Present Knowledge
      • Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
      • Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
      • Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      • Range of Writing
      • Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Standards Credits Teacher Page 1. Cannon Image: < http://www.eurotrader1.com/miniatures.htm >. 2. Common Core Standards for High School History, < http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf >. 3. PowerPoint Retrieved from Springboard, < http://springboard.uakron.edu >. 4. Wikispaces.com, < http://wikispaces.com >. 5. Joseph Nicolino’s Wiki, < https://jnicolino.wikispaces.com/ >. The Template and Training Materials for this WebQuest comes from, The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group