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    Jnicolino.webquest Jnicolino.webquest Presentation Transcript

    • The War of 1812 Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade American History Designed by; Joseph A. Nicolino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page *1
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The War of 1812 was the war that established the United States as a world power and forced Great Brittan to recognize that we were no longer a colony. The causes of the War of 1812 are something that is even harder for historians to understand. These causes varried, but the most accepted cause of the War of 1812 were the embargo acts and the non-intercorse acts. These were repealed by the Brittish parliament prior This document should be written with the student as the intended audience. Write a short paragraph here to introduce the activity or lesson to the students. If there is a role or scenario involved (e.g., "You are a detective trying to identify the mysterious poet.") then here is where you'll set the stage. If there's no motivational intro like that, use this section to provide a short advance organizer or overview. Remember that the purpose of this section is to both prepare and hook the reader. It is also in this section that you'll communicate the Big Question (Essential Question, Guiding Question) that the whole WebQuest is centered around.
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Describe crisply and clearly what the end result of the learners' activities will be. The task could be a:
        • problem or mystery to be solved;
        • position to be formulated and defended;
        • product to be designed;
        • complexity to be analyzed;
        • personal insight to be articulated;
        • summary to be created;
        • persuasive message or journalistic account to be crafted;
        • a creative work, or
        • anything that requires the learners to process and transform the information they've gathered.
      • If the final product involves using some tool (e.g., HyperStudio, the Web, video), mention it here.
      • Don't list the steps that students will go through to get to the end point. That belongs in the Process section.
      Title
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • To accomplish the task, what steps should the learners go through? Use the numbered list format in your web editor to automatically number the steps in the procedure. Describing this section well will help other teachers to see how your lesson flows and how they might adapt it for their own use, so the more detail and care you put into this, the better. Remember that this whole document is addressed to the student, however, so describe the steps using the second person.
      • First you'll be assigned to a team of 3 students...
      • Once you've picked a role to play....
      • ... and so on.
      • Learners will access the on-line resources that you've identifed as they go through the Process. You may have a set of links that everyone looks at as a way of developing background information, or not. If you break learners into groups, embed the links that each group will look at within the description of that stage of the process. (Note, this is a change from the older WebQuest templates which included a separate Resources section. It's now clear that the resources belong in the Process section rather than alone.)
      • In the Process block, you might also provide some guidance on how to organize the information gathered. This advice could suggestions to use flowcharts, summary tables, concept maps, or other organizing structures. The advice could also take the form of a checklist of questions to analyze the information with, or things to notice or think about. If you have identified or prepared guide documents on the Web that cover specific skills needed for this lesson (e.g. how to brainstorm, how to prepare to interview an expert), link them to this section.
    • Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] CATEGORY Excellent 5 Good 4 Acceptable 3 Okay 2 Poor 1 Presentation Well-rehearsed with smooth delivery that holds audience attention. Rehearsed with fairly smooth delivery that holds audience attention most of the time. Average Presentation Delivery not smooth, but able to maintain interest of the audience most of the time. Delivery not smooth and audience attention often lost. Organization Content is well organized using headings or bulleted lists to group related material. Uses headings or bulleted lists to organize, but the overall organization of topics appears flawed. Average organization Content is logically organized for the most part. There was no clear or logical organizational structure, just lots of facts. Content Covers topic in-depth with details and examples. Subject knowledge is excellent. Includes essential knowledge about the topic. Subject knowledge appears to be good. Average Content. Includes essential information about the topic but there are 1-2 factual errors. Content is minimal OR there are several factual errors. Mechanics No misspellings or grammatical errors. Three or fewer misspellings and/or mechanical errors. Average Mechanics Six misspellings and/or grammatical errors. More than eight errors in spelling or grammar. Attractiveness Makes excellent use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. to enhance the presentation. Makes good use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. to enhance to presentation. Average Attractiveness Makes use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. but occasionally these detract from the presentation content. Use of font, color, graphics, effects etc. but these often distract from the presentaion content. Paragraphs on slides and not bullet points.
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Put a couple of sentences here that summarize what they will have accomplished or learned by completing this activity or lesson. You might also include some rhetorical questions or additional links to encourage them to extend their thinking into other content beyond this lesson.
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Cannon Image: < http://www.eurotrader1.com/miniatures.htm >. List here the sources of any images, music or text that you're using. Provide links back to the original source. Say thanks to anyone who provided resources or help. List any books and other analog media that you used as information sources as well. Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials.
    • The War of 1812 (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10th Grade American History Designed by Joseph A. Nicolino [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Conclusion *1
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Begin with something that describes the origin of the lesson. For example: This lesson was developed as part of the San Diego Unified School District's Triton Project, a federally funded Technology Innovation Challenge Grant. In this second paragraph of the introduction, describe briefly what the lesson is about. Remember, the audience for this document is other teachers, not students. Evaluation Conclusion
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Describe the grade level and course that the lesson is designed to cover. For example: &quot;This lesson is anchored in seventh grade language arts and involves social studies and math to a lesser extent.&quot; If the lesson can easily be extended to additional grades and subjects, mention that briefly here as well. Describe what the learners will need to know prior to beginning this lesson. Limit this description to the most critical skills that could not be picked up on the fly as the lesson is given. Evaluation Conclusion
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • What will students learn as a result of this lesson? Describe the outcomes succinctly. Use the language of existing standards. For example:
      • Social Studies Standards Addressed
        • Recognize the relationships among the various parts of a nation's cultural life.
        • Learn about the mythology, legends, values and beliefs of a people
        • .
      • Most lessons don't just teach a block of content; they also implicitly teach one or more types of thinking. In addition to describing learning outcomes within traditional subject areas, describe what kind of thinking and communications skills were encouraged by this lesson. Inference-making? Critical thinking? Creative production? Creative problem-solving? Observation and categorization? Comparison? Teamwork? Compromise?
      Evaluation Conclusion
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page You can paste in the process description given to students in the “ student ” process slide and then interleave the additional details that a teacher might need. Describe briefly how the lesson is organized. Does it involve more than one class? Is it all taught in one period per day, or is it part of several periods? How many days or weeks will it take? Is it single disciplinary, interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary or what? If students are divided into groups, provide guidelines on how you might do that. If there are misconceptions or stumbling blocks that you anticipate, describe them here and suggest ways to get around them. What skills does a teacher need in order to pull this lesson off? Is it easy enough for a novice teacher? Does it require some experience with directing debates or role plays, for example? If you're designing for a one-computer classroom or for pre-readers and are creating a facilitated WebQuest in which the teacher or an aide controls the computer and guides discussion, you can link from here to the Teacher Script page which would contain a printable script for the facilitator to follow. Variations If you can think of ways to vary the way the lesson might be carried out in different situations (lab vs. in-class, for example), describe them here. Evaluation Conclusion
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Describe what's needed to implement this lesson. Some of the possibilities:
        • Class sets of books
        • E-mail accounts for all students
        • Specific software (how many copies?)
        • Specific hardware (what kind? How many?)
        • Specific reference material in the classroom or school library
        • Video or audio materials
      • If the lesson makes extensive use of specific websites, it would be appropriate to list, describe and link them here.
      • Describe also the human resources needed. how many teachers are needed to implement the lesson. Is one enough? Is there a role for aides or parents in the room? Do you need to coordinate with a teacher at another school? With a partner in industry or a museum or other entity? Is a field trip designed in as part of the lesson?
      Evaluation Conclusion
    • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page How will you know that this lesson was successful? Describe what student products or performances you'll be looking at and how they'll be evaluated. This, of course, should be tightly related to the standards and objectives you cited above. You may want to just copy and paste the evaluation section of the student page ( Evaluation ) into this space and add any clarifications needed for another teacher to make use of this lesson. Evaluation Conclusion
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Make some kind of summary statement here about the worthiness of this lesson and the importance of what it will teach. Evaluation Conclusion
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Cannon Image: < http://www.eurotrader1.com/miniatures.htm >. List here the sources of any images, music or text that you're using. Provide links back to the original source. Say thanks to anyone who provided resources or help. List any books and other analog media that you used as information sources as well. Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Conclusion