KRISTIAN AUSTIN<br />KIMBERLY HENNE<br />JESSE NGUYEN<br />JESSIE OSTROW<br />BRITTANY TAIT<br />The Psychology of nigresc...
This stage focuses on the pre-existing identity<br />There are attitudes and characteristics that define this stage:<br />...
Low Salient Attitudes<br />Being Black does not contribute to their lives in any meaningful way. For some, other aspects o...
Miseducation<br />Products of a formal education system that is monoracial and monocultural (white and Western). <br />The...
Spotlight, or Race Image, Anxiety<br />Anxiety about being “too Black,” fulfilling stereotypes.<br />Changes language and ...
Requires established identity<br />Acts as defense to change in identity perception<br />Encounter: must have “the effect ...
Can be a single dramatic event<br />More common to be a chain of events<br />Must personalize event in order to have the i...
In this period of transition, a person begins to demolish their former identity while constructing a new identity. <br />P...
Immersion<br />Individual immerses herself in black culture<br />Joins new organizations and political parties focused on ...
Emersion<br />An emergence from the oversimplified and emotionally charged immersion experience<br />Understands that Blac...
Negative Consequences of Transitional Stage<br />Regression<br />Fixation at Stage 3<br />Dropping Out<br />Stage 3: Immer...
The new identity is internalized<br />Return to steady state of personality and cognitive style<br />Core personality is r...
Defense function becomes more sophisticated and flexible. Involves:<br />An awareness that racism is part of the American ...
Changes frame of reference<br />… in one’s social network<br />… in personal appearance<br />… in what one reads or views ...
Few differences between the psychology of Blacks at 4th and 5th stages<br />Main difference: sustained interest and commit...
Extended the implications of Cross’ model across the life span<br />Some people may find challenges unique to another life...
The Afrocentric movement is an attempt to codify and apply a non-western perspective to the analysis of Black life in the ...
Stage 1: Pre-Encounter<br />Stage 2: Encounter<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion<br />Stage 4: Internalization<br />Stage 5...
Stage 1: Pre-Encounter (Times New Roman Font)<br />Stage 2: Encounter (Arial Font)<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion (Lucid...
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  1. 1. KRISTIAN AUSTIN<br />KIMBERLY HENNE<br />JESSE NGUYEN<br />JESSIE OSTROW<br />BRITTANY TAIT<br />The Psychology of nigrescence<br />
  2. 2. This stage focuses on the pre-existing identity<br />There are attitudes and characteristics that define this stage:<br />Attitudes<br />Low Salience<br />Social Stigma<br />Anti-Black<br />Characteristics<br />Miseducation<br />A Eurocentric Cultural Perspective<br />Spotlight Anxiety<br />Assimilation-Integration<br />Value Structure and Orientation<br />Stage 1: pre encounter<br />
  3. 3. Low Salient Attitudes<br />Being Black does not contribute to their lives in any meaningful way. For some, other aspects of their lives (religion, career, social status) hold more importance.<br />Social Stigma Attitudes<br />Being Black is a stigma or problem. The experience is negative and centered on oppression.<br />Anti-Black Attitudes<br />Black as a “negative reference group”<br />Loathes other Black men and women, the community.<br />Takes a “blame the victim” approach to race relations.<br />Stage 1: pre encounter attitudes<br />
  4. 4. Miseducation<br />Products of a formal education system that is monoracial and monocultural (white and Western). <br />They don’t realize the importance of Black history in American culture or history in general.<br />Black anti-Black people have a negatively distorted view of Black history.<br />Believe that Black people came from a strange, uncivilized land and that slavery was a civilizing experience for them.<br />A Eurocentric Cultural Perspective<br />Despite those that think bi-culturally, more emphasis and value is put on Western concepts and art.<br />Black anti-Black men and women see Black art and concepts as “primitive.”<br />Stage 1: pre encounter Characteristics<br />
  5. 5. Spotlight, or Race Image, Anxiety<br />Anxiety about being “too Black,” fulfilling stereotypes.<br />Changes language and actions when around white people.<br />Black anti-Black people are above anxiety because they believe the stereotypes are true. Enslaved in a body and community they hate.<br />Assimilation-Integration<br />Assimilate into white culture since other disadvantaged, ethnically white groups have.<br />One-way change. White people simply have to accept, whereas Black people need to change their identities.<br />Value Structure and Orientation<br />Priority on organizations and causes that have low race salience.<br />Stage 1: pre encounter Characteristics<br />
  6. 6. Requires established identity<br />Acts as defense to change in identity perception<br />Encounter: must have “the effect of catching him or her ‘off guard’” (pg. 199)<br />Not encounter if it does not impact world view<br />Stage 2: Encounter<br />
  7. 7. Can be a single dramatic event<br />More common to be a chain of events<br />Must personalize event in order to have the impact of “Encounter”<br />Reactions will vary, but many feel confusion, alarm and anxiety<br />Stage 2: Encounter<br />
  8. 8. In this period of transition, a person begins to demolish their former identity while constructing a new identity. <br />Person has made the decision to change, but still in process of transformation<br />They begin to reject aspects of their familiar identity<br />In becoming familiar with their new identity, they immerse themselves in idealistic visions of Blackness<br />Weusior “Black” anxiety<br />Old identity is “bad” and new ideas are “good”<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion <br />
  9. 9. Immersion<br />Individual immerses herself in black culture<br />Joins new organizations and political parties focused on Black issues<br />Drops membership in Pre-encounter oriented groups<br />Individuals in this stage zealously embrace Black culture as liberation from whiteness<br />Focuses on black culture, including music, art, literature, and dress styles<br />May turn to creative expression<br />Primary communication mode for early converts is confrontation/bluntness <br />Blacker-than-thou syndrome <br />Individual becomes especially community-minded<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion <br />
  10. 10. Emersion<br />An emergence from the oversimplified and emotionally charged immersion experience<br />Understands that Blackness and Black identity are complex<br />May switch memberships to organizations considered more committed to Blackness<br />Prepares to internalize a new identity<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion <br />
  11. 11. Negative Consequences of Transitional Stage<br />Regression<br />Fixation at Stage 3<br />Dropping Out<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion <br />
  12. 12. The new identity is internalized<br />Return to steady state of personality and cognitive style<br />Core personality is re-established<br />Shift from how others see you to how you see yourself<br />Conception of Blackness tends to become more open, expansive and sophisticated<br />Person perceives themselves to be completely changed<br />More of an effect on group identity<br />Stage 3: INternalization<br />
  13. 13. Defense function becomes more sophisticated and flexible. Involves:<br />An awareness that racism is part of the American experience<br />An anticipatory set – regardless of one’s station in American society they can be the target of racism<br />We-developed ego defenses that can be employed when confronted with racism<br />A system blame and personal efficacy orientation helping person see that circumstances create racism, not the self<br />2 extremes<br />A person underestimates the importance of racism<br />A person is overly sensitive, seeing racism where it doesn’t exist<br />Stage 3: INternalization<br />
  14. 14. Changes frame of reference<br />… in one’s social network<br />… in personal appearance<br />… in what one reads or views on television<br />… in historical and cultural perspective<br />Ideology<br />Nationalists<br />Bicultural<br />Blackness & Americanness<br />Multicultural<br />Stage 3: INternalization<br />
  15. 15. Few differences between the psychology of Blacks at 4th and 5th stages<br />Main difference: sustained interest and commitment<br />A more differentiated look at Internalization-Commitment awaits future research<br />Stage 5: internalization - commitment<br />
  16. 16. Extended the implications of Cross’ model across the life span<br />Some people may find challenges unique to another life-span phases stimulated by recycling through some of the previous stages<br />“In recycling, a person searches for new answers and continued growth in his or her thinking about what it means to be Black.  Depending on the nature and intensity of the new encounter, recycling may vary from a mild refocusing experience to passage through full-blown Encounter, Immersion-Emersion and Internalization stages.” (p.221)<br />Parham’s Concept of Recycling<br />
  17. 17. The Afrocentric movement is an attempt to codify and apply a non-western perspective to the analysis of Black life in the United States.<br />The two paradigms should remain distinct<br />“Everyone who has a Black identity may not be Afrocentric, as defined by Afrocentric theorists, and Afrocentricity does not incorporate all legitimate interpretations of Blackness” (page 222).<br />Nigrescence and Afrocentricity<br />
  18. 18. Stage 1: Pre-Encounter<br />Stage 2: Encounter<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion<br />Stage 4: Internalization<br />Stage 5: Internalization-Commitment<br />Which stage corresponds to your scenario?<br />
  19. 19. Stage 1: Pre-Encounter (Times New Roman Font)<br />Stage 2: Encounter (Arial Font)<br />Stage 3: Immersion-Emersion (Lucida Fax Font)<br />Stage 4: Internalization (Arial Black Font)<br />Stage 5: Internalization-Commitment (Courier New Font)<br />Which stage corresponds to your scenario?<br />

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