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Powerpoint Sports Coaching Presentation - Formally Introduced by Mr Jonathan Nelson Gregory # An Innovative Professional Coach/Student for the Future! #
 

Powerpoint Sports Coaching Presentation - Formally Introduced by Mr Jonathan Nelson Gregory # An Innovative Professional Coach/Student for the Future! #

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  • Please feel free to add your constructive comments to connect, network, add, develop and achieve better solutions towards a better future of the English Game.

    This also applies to other sporting activities that have great potential and development prospects to dominate other competitors & sports. LET PASSION BE THE DRIVE TO SUCCEED!!!!!

    Thanks 4 Your Time, Observations and Thoughts!!!!!!

    Cheers!!!
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  • Participants Needs for the session: Where fire assembly points are Direct/Show them toilet facilities, Where they can get refreshments Health and Safety Issues such as Not to wear Jewellery, See if they have any medical conditions or injuries, Wear Appropriate football gear such as shin pads, goal keeper gloves, football trainers Tell them delegated First Aid Staff.
  • (D) Self Check - Observing, evaluating on your own, responsibility
  • (C) Reciprocal - Observing, evaluating with partner, social, communication (D) Self Check - Observing, evaluating on your own, responsibility (F) Guided Discovery - Analysing, understanding, selecting
  • (A) Command Style - Observing, Replicating, Safety (D) Self Check - Observing, evaluating on your own, responsibility

Powerpoint Sports Coaching Presentation - Formally Introduced by Mr Jonathan Nelson Gregory # An Innovative Professional Coach/Student for the Future! # Powerpoint Sports Coaching Presentation - Formally Introduced by Mr Jonathan Nelson Gregory # An Innovative Professional Coach/Student for the Future! # Presentation Transcript

  • Sports Coaching Presentation Mr Jonathan Nelson Gregory
  • Goal: To demonstrate a delivered football coaching session to a group of children within a local sports/football academy setting.
  • Contents  The Coach:  Skills & Qualities For Effective Coaching  Responsibilities  FA Coaching Philosophy  Coaching Style’s  Learning Style’s  Coaching & Teaching Style’s Used
  • Contents  Coaching Strategies for Effective Coaching  Planning the Session  Sessions Main Aims & Objectives  The Warm Up  The Main Content  The Warm Down
  • Contents  Review of Learning  Evaluation (Reflective & Analytical)  What Went Well  What Didn’t Go So Well  How The Session Could Be Improved  Action To Take For Next Session A copy of the session/lesson plan will also be given to understand the organised criteria followed within the practice/training activity.
  • The Coach Coaching is a form of teaching as it primarily involves communicating, learning and maintaining positive relationships with those being taught   (Jones, 2004)
  • The Coach Safe Environment for Players Fun & enjoyable Learning experience
  • The Coach SKILLS & QUALITIES EFFECTIVE COACHING Communicate effectively, which is inclusive of listening Provide impartial, timely and constructive feedback Be a good planner Be analytical Create and maintain a safe coaching environment Possession of an enquiring mind in their coaching practice, and be motivated to increase Their coaching skills and knowledge. (Crisfield, 2003)
  • The Coach - Responsibilities  BE AWARE OF HEALTH & SAFETY POLICIES/CHECK LISTS  POSSESS A FIRST AID QUALIFICATION (respond to a range of emergency situations an  Treat common ailments or injuries.)  FIRST AID KIT (full stoked)  HAVE ADEQUATE INSURANCE COVER  ADEQUATE CHILD PROTECTION CERTIFICATE FOR THE AUTHORITY/ESTABLISHMENT YOU ARE WORKING FOR  BE FAMILIAR WITH THE FACILITIES:  Normal Operating Procedures (NOP’s) – Policies & Procedures on minor incidents such as recording incidents via an accident report logs/form.  Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP’s) - Policies & Procedures on major incidents such fi re and facility evacuation points.
  • The Coach - Responsibilities  IMPLEMENT THE SPORTS CODE OF PRACTICE which reflects the key principles:  Your Rights  Relationships  Responsibilities – Personal Standards  Responsibilities – Professional Standards Note: The Code of Practice has been developed by SPORTS COACH UK (Website: www.sportscoachuk.org.) Other resources are available to ensure a good professional coaching practice within your sporting environment and include the following:
  • The Coach - Responsibilities  Safeguarding and Protecting Children (formerly Good Practice and Child Protection)  Equity/Ethics in Your Coaching  The Responsible Sports Coach  Coaching and the Law.  CONDUCT A RISK ASSESSMENT (prior to delivering a session assessing the risk to the coach/s and participants). This includes assessing/recording any issues regarding:  Sports Equipment  Sports Facility/Venue
  • The Coach - Responsibilities IMPORTANT! - BEFORE THE FOOTBALL SESSION STARTS ALWAYS ENSURE THE PARTICIPANTS HAVE: CORRECT FOOTWEAR CORRECT CLOTHING ENSURE PERSONAL JEWELRY/ITEMS ARE REMOVED ENSURE THAT ANY INJURIES OR ILLNESSES ARE ACCOUNTED FOR ALWAYS OUTLINE THE SAFTY IMPLICATIONS WITHIN THE SESSION I.E. WHY WARM UPS AND COOL DOWNS ARE IMPORTANT. REMIND THEM THAT EVERYONE HAS A RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE SAFTY OF OTHERS AND TO RESPECT AND USE THE DEDICATED ACTIVITY AREAS APPROPRIATLY. (Robinson, 2010)
  • The Coach – FA Philosophy FUTURE GAME PLAYING PHYLOSOPHY Outlines a vision for the English game following principles dedicated to future players: In Possession Out of Possession With the Ball Without the Ball Outlines a coaching approach in line with the playing philosophy: Incorporating specialist age appropriate coaches Incorporating more effective youth coaches Work to understand individual needs in regards to a person’s learning development (adopting more/best methods suited to the individual)  (Learning, FA: An Introduction to Coaching Handbook, 2009)
  • The Coach – Coaching Style A coaching style is the way in which the coach delivers his or her coaching session. A coaching style will vary from person to person and situation to situation as the coach adapts their behaviour to meet the specific needs of the performer (Robinson, Effective Coaching, 2010)   Autocratic Command Style – Coach makes all the decisions for the participants   Democratic Interactive Style – Participants discuss and negotiate different issues (concerning game play)   (Mcmorris, 2006)
  • The Coach – Coaching Style  Reproductive Teaching Styles – Pupils are expected to reproduce information or skills given to them or demonstrated by the teacher.    Productive Teaching Styles – Pupils are expected to produce knowledge or skills which they were previously unfamiliar. Referred to as guided discovery or problem solving style.   (Curtner-Smith, 2001)  
  • Learning Styles – How Do We Learn?  Visual -  Auditory - Listening  Reading  Kinestheics – Carry out physical activity The Do-ers
  • Areas of Learning/Development  MOTOR DEVELOPMENT  MOVEMENT/SKILL ACQUISITION  COGNITIVE LEARNING  CHILDHOOD GROWTH (AGE)   (Gallahue, 2007)
  • Learning Styles  The Behaviourist Learning Theory  The Cognitivist Learning Theory  The Constructivist Learning Theory  Social Learning Theory  Humanism Learning Theory
  • Learning Styles Two main schools of thought and their associated theories have predominated in education and sport settings since the nineteenth century (Morgan, 2008) THE BEHAVIOURISM THEORY THE CONSTRUCTIVIST THEORY
  • Learning Style - Behaviourist  The acquisition of a new behaviour through conditioning  Classical conditioning, where the behaviour becomes a reflex response to stimulus.  Operant conditioning, where there is reinforcement of the behaviour by a reward or a punishment.  Stimulus – object or event in the environment  Response – reaction to stimulus conscious or unconscious intentional or reflex mental, physical, glandular  Reward – encourages continued responses  Punishment – decreases probability of the responses, by applying unpleasant stimuli or removing stimuli for reinforcing.
  • Learning Style - Constructivist  Learners construct knowledge for themselves and build new ideas or concepts based upon current knowledge and past experience.    In turn this helps the coach to understand what the children already know when they come into an activity/session (understanding the child's cognitive development).
  • Adopted from the Mosston and Ashton Teaching Styles (Mosston, 2002)   Style Essential Characteristics Focus/Learning Aspects Teaching Style Learning Theory/Outcome A Command Teacher makes all decisions Motor Development Reproductive Behaviourist             B Practice Pupils practice teacher prescribed tasks Motor Development and Autonomy Reproductive Behaviourist             C Reciprocal Pupils work in pairs. One as the teacher and the other as the learner Social, Motor and Cognitive Reproductive Behaviourist             D Self Check Pupils evaluate there own performance against a set criteria Motor, Cognitive and Independence Reproductive Behaviourist             E Inclusion Teacher provides alternative levels of difficulty for pupils Motor, Cognitive and Differentiation Reproductive Behaviourist             F Guided Discovery Teacher plans a target and leads the pupils to discover it   Cognitive and Motor Development Productive Constructivist             G Convergent Discovery Teacher presents a problem and pupils find the correct solution Cognitive, Motor, Social and Affective Development Productive Constructivist             H Divergent Discovery Teacher presents a problem and pupils find their own solution Cognitive, Motor, Social and Affective Development Productive Constructivist             I Individual Programme Teacher decides content and pupils plan and design the programme Cognitive, Personal (Autonomy), and Motor Development Productive Constructivist             K Self Teaching Pupils take full responsibility for the teaching and learning process Personal (Autonomy), Cognitive, Affective and Motor Development     Productive Constructivist
  • Teaching & Learning Styles Used Within the Planned Session Teaching Style – Reproductive Style (A) Command Style - Observing, Replicating, Safety (B) Practice Style - Replicating, Refining, Adapting at own pace (C) Reciprocal - Observing, evaluating with partner, social, communication (D) Self Check - Observing, evaluating on your own, responsibility (F) Guided Discovery - Analysing, understanding, selecting
  • Teaching & Learning Styles Used Within the Planned Session  Learn faster and more efficiently  Intentional – design and control so that all pupils find are motivated.  Operant conditioning – behaviour governed by its consequences and rewards (praise)  Behaviour is directed towards a purpose of a goal
  • Coaching Style  Coach Led  Coach drives learning  Gives information  Provides answers  Solves problems  Student  Replicates, Observes & Adapts Tasks  Asks questions  Seeks help and advice - Communicates  Evaluates their own responsibilities
  • Coaching Strategies for Effective Coaching  ADAPTION& DIFFRENTIATION – The ability to create a series of progressive learning activities that allow every player access to the practice.  The coach will at times need to adapt the coaching environment to meet the needs of his or her performers. This will depend on a number of factors, which include group size, group composition, ability, fitness, skill level and the coach’s experience.  The STEPS concept (FA Introduction to Coaching)– Space, Task, Equipment, Position and Speed –can be adapted to account for a range of needs.  
  •  COMMUNICATE & INSTRUCTION - Being able to communicate effectively by verbal (instruction) and non verbal (body language, facial expressions, gestures) communication.  Body – head, trunk, hands, hips, knees, feet.  Boat – direction, speed, angle, edge, trim.  Blade – shaft/blade angle, position, penetration, cadence/RPM.  Brain – mental state, knowledge.  Background – environment. Coaching Strategies for Effective Coaching
  • Coaching Strategies for Effective Coaching  DEMONSTRATIONS – Demonstrate or perform a particular task effectively  OBSERVATION - What to look and what the coach needs to consider regarding the problem that he or she is observing. This could be from a technical or tactical view that may analyse if the  skill execution is correct, if the technique used is ineffective or if the coach recognizes  why technical errors are occurring and knows how to correct such errors.  FEEDBACK  (Robinson, Effective Sports Coaching, 2010)
  • Planning the Session THE AIM S AND OBJECTIVES OF THE FOOTBALL SESSION THE SKILL/TECHNICAL ASPECT OF : DRIBBLING RUNNING WITH THE BALL THE TACTICAL ASPECT OF:  KEEPING POSSESSION
  • Planning the Session THE SESSION PLAN INCLUDES: ■ Who the group are (Later child hood – children) ■ Individual needs ■ How many players (11 players) ■ age of players (Age 10 and 11 Years) ■ gender (Male & Female) ■ session aims and objectives ■ length of session (1 hour) ■ venue (St Thomas’s Community Network) ■ facility and equipment needs (Balls, Cones, Bibs) ■ medical information (Consent Forms) ■ health and safety issues (HEALTH & SAFETY / RISK ASSESSMENT Procedures/Forms) ■ availability of support staff (Michael Jennings-Bell & Jonathan Gregory)
  • The Warm Up  15 minutes (Duration)  Fun Activity – Robin Hood  The players have to run and retrieve as many balls as possible from the middle of the playing area and return the ball within the designated square/area of their team. The team with the most balls wins.
  • Main Technical Activity 1 TRAFFIC LIGHTS – 20 minutes (Duration)   Players dribble in designated area and wait for instructions from the coach.   The coach must call out specific instructions relating to three cones of different colours. RED, YELLOW and GREEN.  When the RED cone is called the players must stop with their foot on the ball.   When the YELLOW cone is called the players must change direction/turn with the ball.   When the GREEN cone is called the players must increase their speed whilst dribbling/running with the ball.
  • Main Technical Activity 2 SEE IT DO IT – 20 minutes (Duration)   Team A (7 players) must keep possession of the ball from the other players who will defend or intercept play (3 players)   An awarding point will be linked to the succession of the number of passes for example reaching a 10 pass target without an interception.  
  • Warm Down  5 minutes (Duration)  Slow Jog Around Playing Area     Stretching Exercises
  • Warm Down  Two Leg Hamstring Stretch 1. With both feet together and legs fully extended, reach forward with both hands towards your toes. 2. Tuck your chin towards your chest to increase the stretch. 3. Keep your toes pointed towards the sky.  Classic Quadriceps Stretch 1. Standing one leg, grab your opposite ankle and pull your heel into your buttocks. 2. Your bent knee should sty parallel with your standing leg rather then being pulled behind. 3. Push your hips out to increase the stretch and remember not to grab the ankle joint.  4. Repeat for the opposite side. 
  • Warm Down  Standing Groin Stretch 1. Stand with your legs wider than shoulder width apart. 2. Shift your weight onto one side as you bend your knee. 3. Reach with one hand towards your outstretched foot. 4. You should feel the stretch right down the inside of your outstretched leg.  5. Repeat for the opposite side.   (Soccer Stretching Exercises, 2013)
  • Progression’s  Development and extension of a skill as well as the understanding of the task itself    By planning for progression the teacher/coach will aim to bring about the development and extension of learner’s skills and understanding   Gives direction and structure to learning  Start with what learner(s) ‘can do’, then adapt to can do with help, then can do on your own.  Identifies small achievable steps – motivating.  Supports development across a series of activities and series of lessons  (Bailey, 2000)
  • Progression Stages  SKILL SHOULD BE PRACTICED IN STAGES – FOUNDATION STAGE, INTERMEDIATE STAGE, ADVANCED STAGE OVER A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF SESSIONS (Koger, 2005).  SKILLS ARE FOLLOWED FROM INSTRUCTION THE PROGRESSED FOR THE PLAYER TO WORK ON THEIR OWN INITIATIVE NY MAKING THERE OWN DECISIONS  SKILLS CAN BE INTRODUCED  APPLYING SKILLS IN DIFFERENT SITUATIONS
  • Progression Stages  APPLY SKILLS STRATEGICALLY/TACTICALLY  DRILLS CAN BE DONE IN A SMALLER OR LARGER AREA  GROUPS/TEAMS CAN BE CHANGED TO SUIT THE ACTIVITY e.g. 3 v 4,4 v 6, 5 v5.
  • Review of Learning  A - Command, B - Practice Style and the D- Self Check These learning styles will be reviewed through progression stages as individual develops and improves Dribbling Skills and Running with the ball. This will cover: Main Activity Content 1 – Traffic Lights
  • Review of Learning  C – Reciprocal, D - Self Check and F - Guided Discovery These learning styles will be reviewed through observation as individual/group develops and improves ball possession. This will cover: Main Activity Content 2 – See It Do It
  • Review of Learning  A – Command Style and D – Self Check  Warm up and Cool Down will be reviewed by observation - stretching exercises
  • Evaluation – What Went Well  Teaching style appropriate for the session – Warm-up, Activity, Warm Down  Identified the equipment needed for the session  Checked the safety of the facility following the correct procedures  Communicate clearly to the participants the information they need for the session – Session Brief  Encouraged Participants with positive feedback e.g. “You are doing well”, Don’t worry about you mistakes” etc.  Players responded well to feedback  Progression were met to the practice/session activities  Listened to Feedback as I questioned there knowledge e.g. “what did you learn from todays session?” “Did the session today?”.
  • Evaluation – What Didn’t Go So Well  Communication could have been clearer to participants – Coaching points  More preparation on coaching points  More confidence to step in, take control and explain specific factors towards tactical scenario’s  Watch my time keeping is regards to the sessions activity times e.g. warm ups, cool downs etc.  Need to think like a coach and not as a player (limit my involvement within game type activities.
  • Evaluation – How the session could be improved  Felt that one pupil who had autism was disruptive to the group. Sometimes is a positive way asking questions. Sometimes in a negative way not taking part or not doing the activity that was set. Could have dealt with situation better by learning extra skills towards specific medical problems/disabilities.  Could introduce individual progression levels to monitor performance on skills learnt – Monitor skills to see if an individual has developed basic/foundation skills, intermediate or advanced  Plan Sessions in Advance e.g. plan for a session of six weeks to follow and elaborate on progression factors.  Gain feedback from other coaches experiences  Gain more practical coaching experience
  • Evaluation – Action To Take For Next Session  Continue Self Reflection to improve the delivery of future sessions  Observe progression stages - Group/Individual  Communicate more effectively and know what I am going to say – ‘THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK’  Evaluate and Improve Body Language  Focus on Teaching Points e.g. look up when dribbling, close control dribbling etc  Ask the participants what they have learnt  Ask participants if they have understood the various drills/warm up, warm down activities  Keep a smile on my face when delivering a coaching session 
  • References  Soccer Stretching Exercises. (2013, July 07th). Retrieved from Sport Fitness Advisor: http://www.sport-fitness- advisor.com/soccer-stretching.html  Bailey, R. (2000). Planning and Preperartion in Teaching. Teaching Physical Education, 5-11.  Cassidy, T. J. (2004). Understanding Sports Coaching The Social, Cultural and Pedagogical Foundations of Sports Coaching. Oxon: Routledge.  Cook, M. (2009). 101 Youth Football Drills Age 12 to 16. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd.  Cook, M. (2009). 101 Youth Football Drills Age 7 to 11. London: A & C Black Publishers Ltd.  Crisfield, P. C. (2003). The Successful Coach; Guidelines for Coaching Practice. Sports Coach UK Ltd, 3.  Curtner-Smith, M. D. (2001). Teachers use productive and reproductive teaching styles. Educational Research, Volume 43(3), 334 - 340.  Gallahue, D. &.-D. (2007). Developmental Physical Education for All Children. United Kingdom: Human Kinetics.  James, W. B. (1995). Learning Styles: Implications for Distance Learning. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 19- 32.  Jennings, M. &. (2010). Soccer Step By Step. New York: The Rosen Publishing Group.  Jones, R. A. (2004). Sports Coaching Cultures: From Practice to Theory. . London: Routledge.  Koger, R. (2005). Teaching the Techniques and Skills. In 101 Great Youth Soccer Drills (pp. 13-14). New York: McGraw Hill.  Learning, F. A. (2009). FA: An Introduction to Coaching Handbook. Leeds: FA Official Products.  Learning, F. A. (2013, July 02). The Future Game. Retrieved from FA.com/FA Learning.  Mcmorris, T. H. (2006). Coaching Styles. In Coaching Science Theory into Practice (p. 56). West Sussex: John & Wilsons Limited.  Morgan, K. (2008). Pedagogy for Coaches. In R. L. Jones, An Introduction to Sports Coaching from Science and Theory to Practice (p. 4). London: Routledge.  Mosston, M. &. (2002). Teachning Physical Education. San Francisco: Pearson Education Inc.  Robinson, P. E. (2010). Effective Coaching. In Foundations of Coaching (pp. 50-51). Oxon: Routledge.  Robinson, P. E. (2010). Effective Sports Coaching. In Foundations of Sports Coaching (pp. 51-62). Oxon: Routledge.  Robinson, P. E. (2010). The Coach. In Foundations of Sports Coaching (pp. 39-46). Oxon: Routledge. 