Testing the web

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Cucumber introduction

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  • About me:

    I build tools to manage large Rails deployments all day long. Not a bad job, eh?
  • Before we get into monitoring or cucumber, let’s talk about testing.

    In my career as a dev, my testing habits have evolved over time, largely inspired by available tools.

    I’m sure some of you have shared a similar journey - let’s take a quick look back.
  • Save in your editor / refresh in your browser / lather / rinse repeat.

    Occasional human preformed quality assurance

    Broken by design
  • Basically, BDD nirvana. Stakeholder-*writable* if you’re crazy.
  • For those of you that aren’t familiar with Cuke





























  • But what about production? We’re testing all the time in development, while we’re developing the that’s going to create revenue. But in production...
  • ...there’s actually revenue being earned. Why not test with the same veracity in production?



  • Search can fail when the rest of a site works fine due to many reasons:

    * search daemon may go down
    * the indicies may be corrupt
    * or things may fail in a more interesting kind of way...





  • Pingdom’s a relatively new tool that’s gained a good bit of traction. It’s a hosted monitoring service, that can test HTTP and many other types of services from a network of computers around the world. This covers the availability angle quite well
  • Cucumber’s served well for me in my experience in bringing stakeholders and developers together.
  • But with a couple quick edits
  • We have a tool that can help us bring together developers, operations, *and* stakeholders
  • Functionality





























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