WRITING DIALOGUE:
Enhancing Your Narrative
Through Conversation
WHAT IS DIALOGUE?
A written
conversation
between two or more
people or characters
Stephen King says
dialogue “brings
cha...
WHY USE DIALOGUE?
Provides
information
• Reveals character
traits and
relationships
• Subtly reveals
background
informatio...
FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION
Use double quotation marks
(“ ”) to enclose spoken words
Start a new paragraph when
the speaker c...
FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.)
*passage taken from Dress Your Family in
Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris.
FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.)
Use commas with dialogue
tags. This comma should
appear inside the quotation
marks.
Use t...
FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.)
TIPS
Break up dialogue with actions
Don’t over use dialogue tags
Use other phrases besides “he/she
said” to avoid repet...
 Make the dialogue purposeful
 Don’t feel the need to include every one of these
from a conversation, unless they serve ...
TIPS (CONT.)
Listen to people talk to help you write
dialogue that is true to speech
 “You must learn about people from
...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Dialogue

408

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
408
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Dialogue

  1. 1. WRITING DIALOGUE: Enhancing Your Narrative Through Conversation
  2. 2. WHAT IS DIALOGUE? A written conversation between two or more people or characters Stephen King says dialogue “brings characters to life through their speech” (163). King, Stephen. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. Scribner, 2000.
  3. 3. WHY USE DIALOGUE? Provides information • Reveals character traits and relationships • Subtly reveals background information • Creates a sense of time • Adds to conflict(s) Moves the story forward • Brings life to a story • Breaks up paragraphs • Adds white space
  4. 4. FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION Use double quotation marks (“ ”) to enclose spoken words Start a new paragraph when the speaker changes Remember to always indent each new paragraph (tab)
  5. 5. FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.) *passage taken from Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim by David Sedaris.
  6. 6. FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.) Use commas with dialogue tags. This comma should appear inside the quotation marks. Use the ellipsis (…) to show pauses in speech
  7. 7. FORMAT AND PUNCTUATION (CONT.)
  8. 8. TIPS Break up dialogue with actions Don’t over use dialogue tags Use other phrases besides “he/she said” to avoid repetition She whispered He grumbled He pleaded She stammered
  9. 9.  Make the dialogue purposeful  Don’t feel the need to include every one of these from a conversation, unless they serve a purpose: “umm…” “Yeah” “Uh huh” “No” “I don’t know”  Use slang sparingly and with purpose
  10. 10. TIPS (CONT.) Listen to people talk to help you write dialogue that is true to speech  “You must learn about people from people” (Lamott 69).  “If you are a writer, or want to be a writer, this is how you spend your days—listening, observing, storing things away” (66). Lamott, Anne. Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. Anchor, 1994.

×