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Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education
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Generational Differences: Millennials, Social media, and Education

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This is my presentation from Learning Services at Valencia College on Generational Differences in both the classroom and workplace. It focuses mainly on the Millennial generation, the majority of …

This is my presentation from Learning Services at Valencia College on Generational Differences in both the classroom and workplace. It focuses mainly on the Millennial generation, the majority of students in our classrooms today. Dives into social media (Facebook & Twitter) and other key factors that could help engage students.

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  • Generational Differences: Millennials, Social Media, and EducationJosh Murdock@ProfessorJoshInstructional Designer & Professor
  • JoshThe Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • Good business requires good communication. Robert Tanner, author of Understanding and Managing the Four Generations in the Workplace (2001), recommends that employers view generations as another form of diversity. By understanding the strengths, limitations, and values that each generation brings to the workplace, managers can anticipate miscommunications, avoid lost productivity as a result of conflicts, and minimize employee turnover. Tanner offers these suggestions for working effectively with the different age groups in the workplace:
  • Good business requires good communication. Robert Tanner, author of Understanding and Managing the Four Generations in the Workplace (2001), recommends that employers view generations as another form of diversity. By understanding the strengths, limitations, and values that each generation brings to the workplace, managers can anticipate miscommunications, avoid lost productivity as a result of conflicts, and minimize employee turnover. Tanner offers these suggestions for working effectively with the different age groups in the workplace:
  • Good business requires good communication. Robert Tanner, author of Understanding and Managing the Four Generations in the Workplace (2001), recommends that employers view generations as another form of diversity. By understanding the strengths, limitations, and values that each generation brings to the workplace, managers can anticipate miscommunications, avoid lost productivity as a result of conflicts, and minimize employee turnover. Tanner offers these suggestions for working effectively with the different age groups in the workplace:
  • Good business requires good communication. Robert Tanner, author of Understanding and Managing the Four Generations in the Workplace (2001), recommends that employers view generations as another form of diversity. By understanding the strengths, limitations, and values that each generation brings to the workplace, managers can anticipate miscommunications, avoid lost productivity as a result of conflicts, and minimize employee turnover. Tanner offers these suggestions for working effectively with the different age groups in the workplace:
  • Josh
  • The Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • Relatively ShelteredGrew up among “kid safety rules”: school lockdowns, national youth safety movementsMore conventional than Gen-XersHigh level confidence / self importanceTeam OrientedClose with ParentsTechnology Savvy
  • Millennialsto using keyboards rather than pens or pencilsto reading information from computer screens or mobile devices rather than from printed textsto being connected with friends in digital environments learn better through discovery and experiential learning rather than by being toldhave the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choose not to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attentional deploymentbelieve multitasking is a way of life and are comfortable when engaged in multiple activities simultaneouslybelieve staying connected is essential and they want a fast response time (Howe & Strauss, 2000)
  • http://www.flowtown.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Millennials-7-16.png
  • Most have never known a life without computers and the InternetConsider computers a part of lifeConnect to information Communicate in real-timeHave social networkingHave been raised in the presence of video and computer gamesStudents in their 20s may have had more experience with games than with reading (Oblinger,2004).
  • Josh
  • Academic Excellence in 140 Characters http://youtu.be/SVOY2x81_bg1st 2 minutes only!
  • JoshHotseat, a social networking-powered mobile Web application, creates a collaborative classroom, allowing students to provide near real-time feedback during class and enabling professors to adjust the course content and improve the learning experience. Students can post messages to Hotseat using their Facebook or Twitter accounts, sending text messages, or logging in to the Hotseat Web site. http://www.itap.purdue.edu/tlt/hotseat/ http://mashable.com/2009/11/03/hotseat/
  • Joshhttp://www.edsocialmedia.com/2011/02/the-advantage-of-facebook-groups-in-education/ HW Forums:The real beauty of this forum however, is that this model for homework promotes collaboration. Instead of grading homework assignments that are all the same, I have the students build answers to questions by adding off each other and questioning each other. Not only does this prepare a perfect study guide come test time, but it promotes academic discussion outside of the classroom. Some students are stronger in discussion when that discussion unfolds behind a computer screen with more time to analyze and articulate their thoughts in writing.Links & VideosFurthermore, I can also post links, videos, articles, pictures and documents to use in my course. Some of the students were so taken by our discussion of the events in Egypt that they posted news articles, links, and one student even posted a link of a protestor getting shot! This sharing of educational links has changed the way my students look at the facebook.
  • Questions??
  • Josh & Lisa
  • Transcript

    • 1. WHAT IS THIS PRESENTATION ALL ABOUT? 2 The Generations: Who are they? What are they like? What are they doing? How do we engage them?
    • 2. 3
    • 3. 4 Born: 1922–1945 (About 6% of the Workforce) Work, Ethics, and Values: • Hard work • Respect Values • Sacrifice • Duty before fun • Adhere to rules Interactive Style: Individual Communications: Formal memo Messages that motivate: Your experience is respected
    • 4. 5 Let them know that you value their experience and loyalty to the organization, spend adequate time in orientation and training activities (including the use of technology), and respect common norms of courteous behavior.
    • 5. 6 Born: 1946–1964 (About 41% of the Workforce) Work, Ethics, and Values: • Workaholics • Work efficiently • Crusading causes • Personal fulfillment • Question Authority Interactive Style: Team player, loves to have meetings Communications: In person Messages that motivate: Your are needed or valued
    • 6. 7 Millennials in the Workplace: A Helpful Guide (yes, this is a parody) http://youtu.be/Sz0o9clVQu8
    • 7. 8 Show them how they can be an organizational star, provide them with training and developmental opportunities, and involve them in operational matters.
    • 8. 9 Born: 1965–1980 (About 29% of the Workforce) Work, Ethics, and Values: • Eliminate the task • Self-reliance • Want structure and direction • Skeptical Interactive Style: Entrepreneur Communications: Direct and Immediate Messages that motivate: Do it your way and Forget the rules
    • 9. 10 Partner them with mentors (ideally Boomers) whom they can respect, do not expect them to give up their life for the job, promote work/life balance, and refrain from giving them too much extended hands-on supervision.
    • 10. 11 Born: 1981–2000 (About 24% of the Workforce) Work, Ethics, and Values: • What’s next • Multitasking • Tenacity • Entrepreneurial • Tolerant • Goal oriented Interactive Style: Participative Communications: Email, Voicemail Messages that motivate: You will work with other bright, creative people
    • 11. 12 Millennials Guide to Baby Boomers (yes, this is a parody) http://youtu.be/C1a6M3dBNwc
    • 12. 13 Capitalize on their technological skills, provide them with structure, allow them to work in a collaborative manner, be generous with training and orientation activities, and involve them in reverse mentoring programs with Boomers and Gen Xers.
    • 13. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_CgM2btWz M 15
    • 14. The Millennial Generation 16 The Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000). Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.
    • 15. Millennial Students Characteristics 17 What do you believe are the characteristics of a millennial?
    • 16. 18 “Individuals raised with computers deal with information differently compared to previous cohorts: They develop hypertext minds, they leap around.” - Marc Prensky
    • 17. Characteristics of the Millennials O Students of the Millennial Generation are accustomed O Learn better through discovery and experientiallearning rather than by being told O Have the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choose not to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attention deployment O Believe multitasking is a way of life and are comfortable when engaged in multiple activities simultaneously 19
    • 18. 20 Their learning styles originated with millennials growing up with technology  millennials were born around the time the PC was introduced  20% of the students began using computers between the ages of 5 and 8  and almost all millennials were using computers by the time they were 16 to 18 years of age (Jones, 2002).
    • 19. MILLENIALS TECHNOLOGY 21 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% No landline (cell phone… Texted while driving Texted in the past 24 hours Use a cell phone to text Use twitter Posted video of… Used wireless internet… Created social networking… 41% 64% 80% 88% 14% 20% 62% 75% AN D http://bit.ly/aUJvzp
    • 20. MILLENIALS Technology 22 AN D 7% 51% 71% 75% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Feb-05 Aug-06 Nov-08 Jan-10 Social networking sites: how use has changed http://bit.ly/aUJvzp
    • 21. MILLENIALS NEWS 23 AN D http://bit.ly/aUJvzp 50% of Americans said they got some news from a Mobile Device
    • 22. Educational Issues O Diversity of needs, backgrounds, and experiences O High Drop-out and failure rates (average 3 out of 10) O Poor class participation O Typically under prepared O Difficulties relating to authority figures using traditional communication techniques 24
    • 23. They are worth the trouble O Violent Crime is down 60-70% O Teen pregnancy is down O Engaged in community service O Welcomes everyone as part of the community - Tolerant 25
    • 24. How they “ Tick ” O Exposed to vast amounts of information at a very young age O Different patterns of communications and social intimacy O Ambitious, but with unrealistic expectations O Well aware of rules, but enjoy the challenge of circumventing the rules 26
    • 25. ENGAGING THE MILLENNIALS O Learn at a fast pace that does not involve a “telling style”/ “text- oriented” style of teaching O Like visual examples, less text, and less telling O Want interactivity 27
    • 26. 28 “Your goal should not be to discard social media, but to figure out how to make it a powerful tool, rather than a useless distraction.” -Ben Parr
    • 27. A Vision of K-12 Students Today 29 Social Media Revolution
    • 28. 30 “The qualities that make Twitter seem insane and half-baked are what makes it so powerful.” - Jonathan Zittrain –Harvard Law Professor & Internet Expert
    • 29. 31 Glossary of Twitter Terms Tweet. A message sent via Twitter (140 Charters). Hashtag. Hashtags allow the community to easily stream a particular subject by using a hash in front of the tag. Example: Putting #iPhone in a tweet about the iPhone. DM. A Direct Message sent via Twitter only the recipient can see. Twittastic. The Twitter version of fantastic. Dweet. A tweet sent while drunk. http://webtrends.about.com/od/twitter/a/twitter_glossary.htm
    • 30. 32 “Why do I want to write only 140 characters at a time?” -Josh Murdock Variety of Content – News Source – Information – Promotional Tool – Networking - PLN https://twitter.com/professorjosh #EdTech #Elearning #HigherEd #EdChat
    • 31. 33 “It use to be, you had to be famous to let everyone know what was on your mind. Not any more!” -Lisa Macon https://twitter.com/lisamacon
    • 32. 34 “Academic Excellence in 140 Characters.” Rey Junco Study showed the positive effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades. https://twitter.com/reyjunco http://youtu.be/SVOY2x81_bg
    • 33. 35 “Before long you begin to realize how much Twitter helps you inspire others.” - A m a n d a K e r n https://twitter.com/amandakern
    • 34. 36 “ The principle goal of education is to create men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” - Jean Piaget
    • 35. 38 Facebook Stats - www.facebook.com More than 500 million active users 50% of our active users log on daily Average 130 friends People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook Average user is connected to 80 community pages, groups, and events Average user creates 90 pieces of content each month
    • 36. 3939 “FACEBOOK IS MY SOCIAL AND WORK NETWORK.” – Josh Murdock Connect – Collaborate – Share – Network http://www.facebook.com/professorjosh My “Like” Pages
    • 37. 4040 “Not being on Facebook is like not having a TV or not owning a cell phone. You can avoid it, but you’ll really miss out. ” – Lisa Macon http://www.facebook.com/lisamacon
    • 38. 4141 Facebook Groups in Education The Advantage of Facebook Group in Education by Nate Green
    • 39. 4242 “Instead of asking students to stop using it, embrace Facebook as a learning & communication tool.” – A m a n d a K e r n http://www.facebook.com/amandakern
    • 40. 4343 “It’s not just about recipes, fashion, and DIY ideas. You can bookmark and share ideas visually across educational networks ” – Josh Murdock http://www.pinterest.com/professorjosh
    • 41. 44
    • 42. Twitter: @professorjosh Facebook: facebook.com/professorjosh Blog: http://professorjosh.com Email: jmurdock3@valenciacollege.edu

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