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FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy
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FACC teaching the millennial generation - techno savvy

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Learn about the Millennial Generation and tips on connecting to students inside and outside the classroom with a variety of technology.

Learn about the Millennial Generation and tips on connecting to students inside and outside the classroom with a variety of technology.

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    • 1. Teaching the Millennial Generation: Techno Savvy<br />Josh Murdock (Millennial)<br />Valencia Community College<br />
    • 2. Our Millennial Future<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogVTkB_4aOs<br />2<br />
    • 3. The Millennial Generation<br />The Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).<br />The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).<br />Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.<br />Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.<br />This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).<br />3<br />
    • 4. Millennial Students Characteristics<br />What do you believe are the characteristics of a millennial? <br />Relatively Sheltered<br />Grew up among “kid safety rules”: school lockdowns, national youth safety movements<br />More conventional than Gen-Xers<br />High level confidence / self importance<br />Team Oriented<br />Close with Parents<br />Technology Savvy <br />4<br />
    • 5. How they “Tick”<br />Exposed to vast amounts of information at a very young age<br />Different patterns of communications and social intimacy<br />Ambitious, but with unrealistic expectations<br />Well aware of rules, but enjoy the challenge of circumventing the rules<br />5<br />
    • 6. Millennial Students<br />6<br /><ul><li>Have never known a life without</li></ul>computers and the Internet<br /><ul><li>Consider computers a part of life
    • 7. Connect to information
    • 8. Communicate in real-time
    • 9. Have social networking
    • 10. Have been raised in the presence of video and computer games
    • 11. Students in their 20s may have had more experience with games than with reading (Oblinger,2004).</li></ul>These experiences helped to form the way in which millennials seek, process, and report information. <br />
    • 12. 7<br />Individuals raised with computers deal with information differently compared to previous cohorts: “They develop hypertext minds, they leap around.” (Prensky, 2001)<br />
    • 13. 8<br />
    • 14. 9<br />These learning styles originated with<br />millennials growing up with technology<br /><ul><li>millennials were born around the time the PC was introduced
    • 15. 20 percent of the students began using computers between the ages of 5 and 8
    • 16. and almost all millennials were using computers by the time they were 16 to 18 years of age (Jones, 2002). </li></li></ul><li>Characteristics of the Millennials<br />Students of the Millennial Generation are accustomed<br />to using keyboards rather than pens or pencils to write notes and papers<br />to reading information from computer screens or Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) rather than from printed texts<br />to being connected with friends in social networking computer sites rather than in physical meeting places on college campuses, and are used to multitasking in digital environments <br />They are<br />interested in group activities<br />intuitive visual communicators <br />10<br />
    • 17. Characteristics of the Millennials…<br />Millennials<br />learn better through discovery and experiential learning rather than by being told<br />have the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choose not to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attentional deployment<br />believe multitasking is a way of life and are comfortable when engaged in multiple activities simultaneously<br />believe staying connected is essential and they want a fast response time<br />(Howe & Strauss, 2000)<br />11<br />
    • 18. Educational Issues<br />Diversity of needs, backgrounds, and experiences<br />High Drop-out and failure rates (average 3 out of 10)<br />Poor class participation<br />Typically under prepared<br />Difficulties relating to authority figures using traditional communication techniques <br />12<br />
    • 19. They are worth the trouble<br />Violent Crime is down 60-70%<br />Teen pregnancy is down<br />Engaged in community service<br />Tolerant – welcome everyone as part of the community<br />13<br />
    • 20. Techno Savvy<br />Technology is the key<br />Students are “digital natives”<br />Use of technology is inherent, no matter what their interests<br />For other generations, use of technology is foreign (in general)<br />To deny the applications of technology in reaching Millennials may be a mistake<br />14<br />
    • 21. ENGAGING THE MILLENNIALS<br />Millennials<br />learn at a fast pace that does not involve a “telling style”/ “text-oriented” style of teaching<br />like visual examples, less text, and less telling<br />want interactivity<br />Our challenge is to introduce new learning and teaching approaches to engage the millennial students. <br />15<br />
    • 22. A Vision of K-12 Students Today<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_A-ZVCjfWf8<br />16<br />
    • 23. Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.<br />
    • 24. ENGAGING THE MILLENNIALS<br />Now being introduced into the Blackboard/WebCT environment are programs such as Wimba and Elluminate<br />Permit the integration of different technologies such as synchronized chat, use of Whiteboard, online text messaging, and display of PowerPoints with voice accompaniment <br />Other innovative practices that are being implemented include<br />user-created content<br />social networking <br />virtual worlds and avatar creation <br />use of mobile phones for course content delivery<br />and multiplayer educational gaming.<br />18<br />
    • 25. YouTube<br />19<br />http://www.youtube.com/<br />Hosted by Google and EASY to use<br />Allows uploading of videos of limited length by registered users (Free)<br />Vast resources of videos from legitimate news & archive resources<br />Searchable by topic, subject matter, and content<br />
    • 26. Facebook: Oh No…….<br />20<br />www.facebook.com<br />Social networking site<br />Games – educational games available<br />Another way to stay in touch and connect with students<br />Another way to remind students about upcoming events and activities <br />Variety of Privacy Settings<br />http://www.facebook.com/joshmurdock<br />
    • 27. Facebook: Educational Uses<br />Allows for easy communications among classmates, the way they like to communicate<br />Allows classmates to get to know one another on a social level outside of class<br />Can be used to broadcast messages to students about upcoming activities/assignments in a place where they are always looking <br />21<br />
    • 28. MySpace: Are you for real? <br />22<br />www.myspace.com <br />Social Networking Tools<br />Myspace.com<br />Blocked by public libraries (it’s the law) <br />Many colleges & schools block this website with a firewall – Why?<br />Student spend a lot of time there<br />Sexual predators & other negative characters <br />
    • 29. Wikipedia<br />23<br />www.wikipedia.org<br />Free encyclopedia that anyone can edit<br />Over 10 million articles in 250 languages<br />Over 2.5 million articles in English<br />Written by “consensus” and constantly being edited<br />
    • 30. Blogging Software <br />24<br />Allows creation of “closed” or “open” forum settings<br />Template driven & minimal tech knowledge needed<br />Allows monitoring of commentary before “posting”<br />Hosts web links and podcast links<br />www.blogger.com<br />
    • 31. Educational Uses of Blogs <br />25<br />Forum for students, faculty to display and share ideas and invite commentary by designated contributors or the public<br />Project sharing/showcasing space to seek and allow feedback by participants<br />Platform to disseminate content material<br />Personal / professional portfolios<br />
    • 32. twitter <br />26<br />Collaboration<br />Reach a larger audience<br />Share ideas<br />Inspire<br />Stay updated<br />Communicate<br />Network<br />http://twitter.com/professorjosh<br />http://twitter.com <br />
    • 33. Second Life – Virtual Education<br />27<br />Multi-user Virtual Environment<br />Avatar based – you create a character for yourself<br />Many educational locations<br />Warning - many seedy locations<br />Model Examples: Art, Theater, Museums<br />Delivery of web-based courses synchronous <br />http://www.valenciacc.edu/ltad/secondlife/<br />http://secondlife.com<br />http://teen.secondlife.com <br />
    • 34. ENGAGING THE MILLENNIALS<br />The textbook industry recognizes the millennial students’ ability <br />to be interactive <br />to work in group activities<br />to multi-task<br />and access information in an expedient manner from faculty as well as other group members—<br />and the publishers are providing <br />technological tools for teachers to <br />incorporate into their pedagogy <br />to engage the millennial learner. <br />28<br />
    • 35. WebQuest<br />WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web.<br />Is a way to make good use of the internet while engaging their students in the kinds of thinking that the 21st century requires. <br />Sample<br />29<br />
    • 36. TOOLS FOR ENGAGEMENT<br />Textbook publishers are offering textbook content <br />delivered via audio for downloading to students’ iPods <br />as well as providing e-texts for students to read on their computers, iPhones, or iPads<br />In teaching the faculty member becomes a guide who poses questions-- guides the students’ learning process. <br />Learning is shifting away from an entire class of faculty-centered lectures.<br />Educators are encouraged to include <br />group work activities<br />experiential learning<br />and interactive exercises or role playing<br /> exercises for students.<br />30<br />
    • 37. 31<br />
    • 38. TOOLS FOR ENGAGEMENT<br />Textbook publishers recognize the need for the in-class activities and are responding by providing additional <br />role playing exercises<br />case studies<br />as well as experiential exercises for in-class use<br />PowerPoints developed to use student response systems.<br />Learning environments can be created:<br /><ul><li>with students sharing information through bulletin boards or blogs.
    • 39. Field-based research projects have students engaged in learning real-time—and, working within a team fosters sharing of diverse ideas and synthesizing information. </li></ul>(“Training the Different Generations” 2004; Frand, 2000). <br />32<br />
    • 40. CONTACT INFORMATION<br />Twitter: @professorjosh<br />Facebook: joshmurdock<br />Email: jmurdock3@valenciacc.edu<br />
    • 41. WORKS CITED<br />Frand, J.L. (Sept./Oct., 2000). The information age mindset: Changes in students and implications for higher education. Educause Review. http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/erm00/articles005/erm0051.pdf<br />Howe, N. & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials Rising. New York: Vintage Books.<br />Jones, S. (Sept. 15, 2002). The internet goes to college: How students are living in the culture with today’s technology. Pew Internet & American Life Project, Washington, D.C. http://www.pewinternet.org/reports/toc.asp?Report=71<br />Prensky, M. (Dec. 2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants, part II: Do they really think differently? On the Horizon, 9 (6) 15-24, http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/<br />Training the different generations” (2004) Retrieved from http://media.wiley.com/product_data/excerpt/7X/07879697/078796977X.pdf<br />34<br />

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