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The fourth commandment honor they father and mother-catholic nab and cathechism
 

The fourth commandment honor they father and mother-catholic nab and cathechism

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Teaching based on the teachings of Fr. Al Lauer of Presentation Ministries, Cinncinatti, Ohio

Teaching based on the teachings of Fr. Al Lauer of Presentation Ministries, Cinncinatti, Ohio

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  • The first question in life is Who is Jesus? The second is who am I? Jesus asks us “Who do you say I am?” When we recognize Jesus Christ as our Savior, we reverse the situation and ask Him, “Who do You (Jesus) say I am? We tell Jesus who He is, then He tells us who we are. Who am I as a child of God as well as a child of my parents? What am I called to do to? We are called to honor both Him and our parents. God has willed that after honoring him we should honor our parents because they brought us into life. After our relationship with the Lord, the most fundamental relationship is that of honoring our fathers and mothers. Our child-parent relationship needs to be a strong as possible. No matter what our age, we must honor and love our parents. We must ask our parents to forgive us and we should forgive them for even the greatest hurts. We should pray for them on a daily basis. No matter how old we are, we should seek their guidance, give them prime-time, and openly tell that that we love them. Even when if our parents are not completely open to us. Many families are in chaos today because we fail to honor our parents and society. If one or both of our parents are dead, we should talk to Jesus and ask Him to reconcile any difficulties between us and our deceased parents. In my case I had occasion when I had a verbal confrontation with my father in-law and we had argued about his view on my staying at home vs. working. We were not on the same page. I made my statement to him but never offered reconciliation. When he was called to heaven, it hit me like a ton of bricks that I did not honor him and needed to seek forgiveness. It was a sad time for me not to have had the chance to say I was truly sorry to him. You can’t go back and change the past. But you can learn from my witness and pray to God for forgivenessif this has happened to you and one of your parents or in-laws.
  • Some families are dysfunctional and perhaps one has been deprived of full parenting, One these kind of situations we need to ask the Lord to lead people in our lives to father or mother us (Romans 16:13) as in Romans 16:13 it says ‘ Greeting to Rufus, chosen in the Lord, and his mother, who has been a mother to me, too.” We must be parented if we art to be part of building Christ's kingdom. A good or reconciled relationship with our parents builds a foundation to enable us to reach out and love others. 16:13: Rufus is identified as a chosen servant of the Lord—a Church leader. He may be one of the sons of Simeon of Cyrene who became prominent in the Church (see Mk 15:21) or he may be Rufus Prudens, a Roman Senator who sheltered the Church in his palace (see 2 Tim 4:22). Paul is fond of his mother who became a spiritual mother to him.
  • According to Luke 2:51 He (Jesus) went down with them (His parents) then, and came to Nazareth, and was obedient to them. Our first relationship is with our parents. In this relationship we start to discover who we are. So, the child-parent relationships the foundation of siblings, marriage, family and community relationships. In Luke’s portrayal Jesus first sets forth in Himself an example, and afterwards, as far as words can go, draws there from rules of life, as He does here, showing forth by His work these three things above the rest, the love of God, honor to parents, but the preferring God also to our parents. His parents had probably come to the feast with lots of friends and relatives and so when Jesus wasn't around they didn't worry. They had small children to care for. They assumed Jesus was with family or friends. When the group headed home they still assumed that Jesus was with someone else. Perhaps they weren't very attentive parents. Perhaps they should have known better. But after the first day of travel they looked for him and couldn't find him. They headed back to Jerusalem probably in a panic. They looked frantically for three days. Finally they found him in the temple.Now look at what happened. His parents scolded Him (this often happens when we are afraid). Jesus was confused. He said, "didn't you know that I had to be in my Father's house?" But his parents did not understand.Now here's what I want you to see. His parents didn't understand, but he "went down to Nazareth with them and was obedient to them." Why? Because it is right and because it is pleases the Lord. So, now that you know what Jesus would do, will you follow his example?
  • This commandment is expressed in positive terms of duties to be fulfilled. It introduces the subsequent commandments which are concerned with particular respect for life, marriage, earthly goods, and speech. It constitutes one of the foundations of the social doctrine of the Church. THE FOURTH COMMANDMENTHonor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land which the Lord your God gives you.4 He was obedient to them.5` The Lord Jesus himself recalled the force of this “commandment of God.”6 The Apostle teaches: “Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. ‘Honor your father and mother,’ (This is the first commandment with a promise.) ‘that it may be well with you and that you may live long on the earth.’”72197 The fourth commandment opens the second table of the Decalogue. It shows us the order of charity. God has willed that, after him, we should honor our parents to whom we owe life and who have handed on to us the knowledge of God. We are obliged to honor and respect all those whom God, for our good, has vested with his authority. (1897)This commandment is expressed in positive terms of duties to be fulfilled. It introduces the subsequent commandments which are concerned with particular respect for life, marriage, earthly goods, and speech. It constitutes one of the foundations of the social doctrine of the Church. (2419)The fourth commandment is addressed expressly to children in their relationship to their father and mother, because this relationship is the most universal. It likewise concerns the ties of kinship between members of the extended family. It requires honor, affection, and gratitude toward elders and ancestors. Finally, it extends to the duties of pupils to teachers, employees to employers, subordinates to leaders, citizens to their country, and to those who administer or govern it. This commandment includes and presupposes the duties of parents, instructors, teachers, leaders, magistrates, those who govern, all who exercise authority over others or over a community of persons.2200 Observing the fourth commandment brings its reward: “Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long in the land which the LORD your God gives you.”8 Respecting this commandment provides, along with spiritual fruits, temporal fruits of peace and prosperity. Conversely, failure to observe it brings great harm to communities and to individuals. (2304)
  • Most social workers, psychologist and psychiatrists have recognized the Biblical principle of the primacy of the child-parent relationships. By focusing on this, we are able to lay a foundation for all other relationships in our lives and to get to the root of problems.
  • The Lord revealed that the commandment to honor our parents “is the first commandment to carry a promise with it-That it may go well with you, and that you may have a long life on earth. (Eph 6:2-3) Honoring is not only a matter of obeying.
  • The importance of this commandment is signaled to us not so much by arresting statistics as by its position in the Decalogue, the Ten. We have seen that the Ten Commandments are organized into two Tables, the First dealing with our relationship to God, and the Second with our relationship with our fellow man. The commandment to honor our parents thus stands at the head of the Second Table--or perhaps we could better see it as a transitional commandment between the First and the Second. Why is this so? Because this is the first place the rubber of submission to God meets the road of relationships. Why? Because God's authority is delegated in a limited way to the parents in the home, to the elders in the Church, to the teacher in the school, and to the magistrate in the state. But the family is the place where the pattern of love, respect and submission to God, which is the basis of order in all these other areas, is first set.
  • Why the promise? I believe it I proof that God has placed great priority upon this commandment. It shows the importance He attaches to our obedience to our parents. We build a foundation for our children and build up the body of Christ in love. We grow in love primarily by building our family relation ships according to God’s order.
  • The Lord revealed that the commandment to honor our parents “is the first commandment to carry a promise with it- that it may go well with you, and that you may have -long life on earth” (Eph 6:2-3) According to Navvarre: St. Paul tells us in Ephesians to teach us how to deal with child-parent relationships. He recalls the fourth commandment ( the first of the commandments that deals with man.) to which a promise of a blessing is attached for those who keep it. Honoring one’s parents means loving and obeying them as in right, and caring for them spiritually and materially when their age or circumstance requires it. To those who keep this commandment, the Lord promises happiness and a long life. Ephesians says that to honor thy father and mother is a two fold reward. If we honor our parents things may go well with us and that you might have a long life. Honoring is not only a matter of obeying
  • There are two factions of American society that often end up in full-time-care facilities-our young and our old. (References 1 and 3) While we pick up our children from day care, love them, hug them and ask about their day, the elderly are often forgotten. Visits by family may be an afterthought while siblings argue over whose responsibility it is to care for the ones who so lovingly cared for them. It is responsibility and duty as children to help our parents out as the get older and need our help.Read more: Siblings Taking Responsibility for Their Elderly Parents | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8118434_siblings-taking-responsibility-elderly-parents.html#ixzz25VqsbVJx
  • These are listed in order. One leads to another. Without a good child-parent relationship, we don’t know what it is to receive love. ( 1 John 4:19) Without brother and sister relationships in the blood family and the church family, we don’t know how to give love. (see 1 John 4:29)Everyone is called to have these two relationships, and most people are called to have the two other relationships of being a spouse and a parent. These relationships are realities of fundamental importance. In our role as a child a good or reconciled relationship with our parentswill build us up to reach out and love others. Then we can be true brothers and sister, and begin being community, Church and the people of God. In our relationships with siblings, we receive and give respect, affection, encouragement and strength. We begin to grow deeply, using our spiritual gifts, and become disciples of Christ. We learn to love unconditionally, to love our enemies, and to give without counting the cost. We begin first in the role as a child, then we learn to be brothers and sisters, we become more mature and true servants of Jesus. We move from being self-centered into being other centered. We must have a brotherhood and sisterhood in our natural family and our church family.. If we do not have this foundation of who am I in Christ as a child and as a sibling , we wouldn’t know how to live or love, and we wouldn’t have the ability to discern or live out a calling to be single life in the Lord, marriage or parenting. We must let our elder Brother Jesus teach us how to be brothers and sisters in the Lord
  • The duties of children2214 The divine fatherhood is the source of human fatherhood;16 this is the foundation of the honor owed to parents. the respect of children, whether minors or adults, for their father and mother17 is nourished by the natural affection born of the bond uniting them. It is required by God's commandment.182215 Respect for parents (filial piety) derives from gratitude toward those who, by the gift of life, their love and their work, have brought their children into the world and enabled them to grow in stature, wisdom, and grace. "With all your heart honor your father, and do not forget the birth pangs of your mother. Remember that through your parents you were born; what can you give back to them that equals their gift to you?"192216 Filial respect is shown by true docility and obedience. "My son, keep your father's commandment, and forsake not your mother's teaching.... When you walk, they will lead you; when you lie down, they will watch over you; and when you awake, they will talk with you."20 "A wise son hears his father's instruction, but a scoffer does not listen to rebuke."212217 As long as a child lives at home with his parents, the child should obey his parents in all that they ask of him when it is for his good or that of the family. "Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord."22 Children should also obey the reasonable directions of their teachers and all to whom their parents have entrusted them. But if a child is convinced in conscience that it would be morally wrong to obey a particular order, he must not do so.As they grow up, children should continue to respect their parents. They should anticipate their wishes, willingly seek their advice, and accept their just admonitions. Obedience toward parents ceases with the emancipation of the children; not so respect, which is always owed to them. This respect has its roots in the fear of God, one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit.
  • 2218 The fourth commandment reminds grown children of their responsibilities toward their parents. As much as they can, they must give them material and moral support in old age and in times of illness, loneliness, or distress. Jesus recalls this duty of gratitude.23For the Lord honored the father above the children, and he confirmed the right of the mother over her sons. Whoever honors his father atones for sins, and whoever glorifies his mother is like one who lays up treasure. Whoever honors his father will be gladdened by his own children, and when he prays he will be heard. Whoever glorifies his father will have long life, and whoever obeys the Lord will refresh his mother.24O son, help your father in his old age, and do not grieve him as long as he lives; even if he is lacking in understanding, show forbearance; in all your strength do not despise him.... Whoever forsakes his father is like a blasphemer, and whoever angers his mother is cursed by the Lord.252219 Filial respect promotes harmony in all of family life; it also concerns relationships between brothers and sisters. Respect toward parents fills the home with light and warmth. "Grandchildren are the crown of the aged."26 "With all humility and meekness, with patience, [support] one another in charity."272220 For Christians a special gratitude is due to those from whom they have received the gift of faith, the grace of Baptism, and life in the Church. These may include parents, grandparents, other members of the family, pastors, catechists, and other teachers or friends. "I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you."28
  • While obedience is required, it is "in the Lord" (Eph. 6:1). This means that what we are obeying is God's authority delegated to our parents. If any human authority were to order us to disobey God, we are to obey God rather than men, as Peter explains in Acts. While it is very awkward and not very practicable for small children in such a situation, parents are not exempted from this principle. Remember, it is not a command you dislike, or even one that is unfair, but one that would require you to disobey a clear command of God that is at issue. There might come a time for an older child--or wife--or student--or citizen--to say, "I'm sorry, but I just can't do what you are asking." But if he does, he had better be able to say, "You know I always obey you in the Lord; you know this isn't just rebellion." With any human authority, the principle is that it is only submission to right authority that can give you the right to refuse to obey wrongfully wielded power. And so you must remember that God will judge you if it is only an excuse to get your own way.When you leave home and set up your own household, the requirement of obedience ceases. But the honoring and respect of your parents does not cease; it just takes on a new form. We are still to show them respect, reverence, and love. It does not matter whether they deserve it! We treat them as we should because we do it unto the Lord. It is Him that we honor by honoring them. Honor involves paying practical attention to them--not ignoring them, which is easy to do with the pressures of our own careers, kids, etc. It may involve supporting them in their old age. They supported us when we were helpless! The government may provide social security, but spiritually the buck stops with us.
  • Children be obedient to your parents in all things, for this is well, pleasing to the Lord. The passage before us is clear and to the point: "Children, obey your parents in everything, for this pleases the Lord." The first question we must ask is this: What does the word "children" mean. As I understand it, the word for children refers to anyone who is still under parental guidance. In other words, if you are living at home you are included in this command.But I contend that these words really have something for each of us. When we become adults we no longer are required to obey everything our parents say, there are still some responsibilities. That's why I call the message: "To the Children in All of Us".Thecommand is simple: "obey in everything for this pleases the Lord." Children are commanded to listen to and do what their parents tell them. But most children today would respond to such counsel with a defiant, "Why should I?" Some would say things like, "My parents don't know nuthin'" or "My parents are stupid!" I give you three reasons why we have an obligation under the Lord to obey. n the ten commandments God says, "Honor your father and your mother, so that you may live long in the land the LORD your God is giving you." This idea is so important it is one of the "Big Ten". Respect for authority is a key principle throughout the Bible. God tells us that respect for parents is the key to long and fruitful living. Once respect for authority is lost, a society crumbles. And this respect begins in the home. A child who is allowed to dishonor his/her parents will spend their lives rebelling against authority. The idea of right and wrong will become blurred.. Children are born like a blank slate. If they are nurtured appropriately, they will be wonderful and productive members of society. In other words, kids will all be great if parents and society will just keep from messing things up. Therefore, anything a child does that's wrong is not their fault but the fault of the home or society in which they were raised. We hear that these children were raised in homes where parents were overly strict (by whose definition of "overly"?), or where these children faced unfair rejection by society. The result of this popular mindset it the society we are now living in. n Psalm 51:5, David writes, "Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my mother conceived me." We have to teach a child to pray, to respect, to share, to love. But have you noticed that you don't have to teach a child to spit, or swear, say "mine", or throw temper tantrums. It all comes naturally. Have you ever heard a parent say they were not going to teach their children the things of God because they wanted their children to decide these things for themselves? They figured when their children got older they could more accurately choose. This is not what God commanded us to do. Our children are not facing neutrality in other areas of life. Everywhere they turn, the Devil's influence is seen. They see it on television, in the books they read, in the school yard, and yes . . . even in their own hearts. What about children with non-Christian parents? Children from non-Christian homes desperately need Christian friends, relatives, and teachers. They need to learn from someone that their life is not just a chance happening. Someone needs to tell these children that Jesus loves them.
  • The Bible was so insistent on this principle listen to the counsel it gives: Exodus 21:15, 15 "Anyone who attacks his father or his mother must be put to death. Exodus 21:17 "Anyone who curses his father or mother must be put to death." In Leviticus 20:9 we read, "'If anyone curses his father or mother, he must be put to death. He has cursed his father or his mother, and his blood will be on his own head." Prov. 30:17 "The eye that mocks a father, that scorns obedience to a mother, will be pecked out by the ravens of the valley, will be eaten by the vultures."
  • When you honor your parent, you honor yourself. When honoring you parent, you place yourself and those you love on a path to a good life. If you were unfortunate enough to have parents that lacked parenting skills, do not spend your life blaming your problems on them. As a parent, you can change the world through your children. What kind of example would you be? You can make a positive change in your life, and those around you by accepting authority in your life. Practically, honoring our parents means, A child that is abusive or disrespectful needs to be shown the negative consequences of such behavior in no uncertain terms. It also refers to when you are talking about your parents to your friends. They are not your "old man" or "old lady" or any of the other things you might call them. They are your mother and father and deserve your respect. But please note that this respect does not end when we leave home. Solomon writes, Prov. 23:22 "Listen to your father, who gave you life, and do not despise your mother when she is old." Though we change our relationship with our parents when we leave home . . .we should still honor and respect them. Honoring our parents means being aware of and concerned for their feelings. Young people, everything you say and do reflects either positively or negatively on your parents. The Proverbs tell us: "A wise son brings joy to his father, but a foolish son grief to his mother." (Pr. 10:1) We honor our parents much like we honor our Lord - by living appropriately. Most children don't give much thought to the impact their behavior has on their parents (or anyone else). The child who is seeking to honor their parents remembers that their actions reflect on their parents. Honoring your parents means being grateful for the things you are given. We tend to take for granted the food, the provisions, the chauffeuring around, the care while you are sick, the encouragement received. Every once in a while, a person who is honoring their parents, makes it a point to say, "Thanks". A person who honors their parents notices their efforts and is grateful.Once we leave home we are responsible for making our own decisions. But we are still called to honor our parents. In 1 Timothy 5:4, Paul writes, "But if a widow has children or grandchildren, these should learn first of all to put their religion into practice by caring for their own family and so repaying their parents and grandparents, for this is pleasing to God."Perhaps your parent is in a Nursing home. It is hard to go see them because they are different. They don't understand why they can't go home. They sometimes get angry or weepy. Sometimes they may not even know who you are. But do you understand that you honor them when you go see them anyway? This kind of thing is hard, but it pleases the Lord.
  • As we look more closely at the meaning of the Fifth Commandment, one of the first things we should notice is that it is not just directed at little children. A little girl came home frustrated from Sunday School. "I don't get it," she complained. "It's always the children of Israel did this, and the children of Israel did that. Didn't the ADULTS ever do anything?" Well, yes they did. One of the things they did was get this commandment commanded to them.What happens when we think of this commandment is that we equate it with Eph. 6:1--"Children, obey your parents." But that is not merely a repetition of the commandment, but rather a specific application of it to childhood. Obedience is the form that honor takes when one is a child. There will come a time when one's parents no longer have to be obeyed. But the requirement of honoring them never ceases; it just takes a different form. When is that time? Is it the age of 18? of 21? The Bible knows nothing of any such criterion. The principle is laid down in Gen. 2:24. "For this cause shall a man leave his father and his mother and cleave unto his wife." Now, this does not mean you must obey your parents forever if you never get married. The point is that you are no longer under their authority when you leave home, start paying your own way, and set up you own household. If you move back in with them at the age of 30, 40, or 50, they are still the heads of that home and have the right to set the rules. (On the other hand, if they move in with you to be cared for in their old age, YOU are the one in authority. You must do so respectfully, of course, but it's your house so you set the rules. The question is, who is the head of this home?) It has nothing to do with how old you are. Authority is transferred in the leaving and cleaving process.
  • While obedience is required, it is "in the Lord" (Eph. 6:1). This means that what we are obeying is God's authority delegated to our parents. If any human authority were to order us to disobey God, we are to obey God rather than men, as Peter explains in Acts. While it is very awkward and not very practicable for small children in such a situation, parents are not exempted from this principle. Remember, it is not a command you dislike, or even one that is unfair, but one that would require you to disobey a clear command of God that is at issue. There might come a time for an older child--or wife--or student--or citizen--to say, "I'm sorry, but I just can't do what you are asking." But if he does, he had better be able to say, "You know I always obey you in the Lord; you know this isn't just rebellion." With any human authority, the principle is that it is only submission to right authority that can give you the right to refuse to obey wrongfully wielded power. And so you must remember that God will judge you if it is only an excuse to get your own way.When you leave home and set up your own household, the requirement of obedience ceases. But the necessity to honor your parents does not cease; it just takes on a new form. We are still to show them respect, reverence, and love. It does not matter whether they deserve it! We treat them as we should because we do it unto the Lord. It is Him that we honor by honoring them. Honor involves paying practical attention to them--not ignoring them, which is easy to do with the pressures of our own careers, kids, etc. It may involve supporting them in their old age. They supported us when we were helpless! The government may provide social security, but spiritually the buck stops with us. In today’s society there are many adult children who return home due to circumstances and when they return to their parent’s home they must honor and respect the rules of their parent’s home.
  • 0ur parents are the first of these authorities we have to learn to honor in time, the first we encounter chronologically. But it is more than that. They are also the ones who are most like God. Like God, they brought us into existence without our advice, consent, or aid. They sustained us, through nursing, diapers, etc., when we were totally helpless; in this they are a picture of Grace. They are the first and primary source, by their instruction, their discipline, and their example, of our ideas of right and wrong; in this they are a type of God as judge. Even poor and imperfect parents--all but the most evil--function in these ways and portray for us this symbolism, however imperfectly. And therefore it is no accident that the most basic and important title for God in the Christian faith is Father. Therefore it is absolutely crucial that we respond to our parents properly. If we do not honor our father and our mother whom we can see, how shall we honor God whom we cannot see? Or anyone else to whom honor and submission is due? Show me a person who does not honor his parents and I will show you a person who does not relate properly to God and live for his glory, either. And most likely he will be a person who got into trouble in school, looks at the Church (if at all) as a religious cafeteria that exists solely to meet his own needs, and keeps the law of the land only when it seems expedient. I am not saying that without good parents you are doomed. I am saying that if you do not honor God in your parents as his representatives, the concept is not suddenly going to dawn on you down the road without (a) a miracle and (b) a great deal of unnecessary grief. So, parents, while this commandment may seem to be directed at our children, it is important for us too. We must by God's grace and enabling (and it can only happen thus) be people to whom our children can naturally learn to give honor. Therefore, you cannot be a good parent without being a godly parent: immersed in Scripture, faithful in the Church, leading by example. If you are immersed in Scripture, faithful in the Church, and leading by example, you may then receive honor from your children and direct it on to God. Being a parent is an opportunity to lead your children to faith in Christ and begin discipling them that is unparalleled in life.

The fourth commandment honor they father and mother-catholic nab and cathechism The fourth commandment honor they father and mother-catholic nab and cathechism Presentation Transcript