Landscape Architecture Portfolio
                          Kansas State University




                                   ...
ABOUT
A look into my past will reveal the priceless experiences that have shaped my character, leadership
abilities, and d...
FIRST YEAR STUDIO WORK
Two words that effectively sum up my recipe
for success in the first year studios are focus
and con...
ENVD 201 + 202 | Prof. Kingery-Page + Chambers | Fall 2006 + Spring 2007




ANALYSIS OF EXISTING SPACE: represents volume...
HAND GRAPHICS
In addition to my hard work ethic and desire
to lead, being teachable is another trait that I
possess. Unlik...
LAR 310 | Design Graphics and Visual Thinking | Dean Law | Fall 2007




WATERCOLOR ON WATERCOLOR PAPER




              ...
TAOS SUMMER INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND CRAFTS
Location: Taos, New Mexico
Size: 8.5 acres
Media: SketchUP; Marker; Colored Penci...
LAR 220 | Site Design Studio I | Prof. Clement and Kingery-Page | Fall 2007
                                              ...
WASHINGTON MARLATT PARK
Location: Manhattan, Kansas
Size: 160 acres
Media: ArcGIS; SketchUP; Marker; Colored
Pencil
Each d...
LAR 420 + LAR 220 | Natural Systems and Site Analysis + Site Design Studio I | Prof. Keane + Clement + Kingery-Page | Fall...
KABUL UNIVERSITY GATEWAY
Location: Kabul, Afghanistan
Size: 4 acres
Media: SketchUP; Marker; Colored Pencil
Identity and s...
LAR 320 | Site Design Studio II | Prof. Kingery-Page + Klein | Spring 2008
                                               ...
SUMMER INTERNSHIP: FORUM STUDIO, INC.
Refusing to stop my learning experience at the
end of the 2008 spring semester, I wo...
Summer 2008




PLANTING SCHEDULE FOR PRESENTATION TO CLIENT   Industrial Design   13
“REFUGE”
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Size: 1.75 acres
                                                                  ...
LAR 410 | Planting Design Studio | Prof. Skabelund + Winslow | Fall 2008




                    Code          Botanical N...
CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
Client: Doane College
Location: Crete, Nebraska
Size: 5 acres
Media: AutoCAD; Microsoft Excel
As I ...
LAR 438 | Land Construction I | Prof. Winslow | Fall 2008




                                                            ...
CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS
Client: Doane College
Location: Crete Nebraska
Size: 5 acres
Media: AutoCAD
During Construction II,...
LAR 439 | Land Construction II | Prof. Hahn | Spring 2009




              Layout and Dimensioning                19
NINTH AND COLORADO REDEVELOPMENT - MASTERPLAN
Location: Denver, Colorado
Size: 32 acres
Media: SketchUP; AutoCad; Illustra...
LAR 442 | Site Planning and Design Studio | Prof. Belanger + Hunt | Spring 2009




                                      ...
NINTH AND COLORADO REDEVELOPMENT - DETAIL AREA
Location: Denver, Colorado
Size: 5 Acres
Media: SketchUP; AutoCad; Illustra...
LAR 442 | Site Planning and Design Studio | Prof. Belanger + Hunt | Spring 2009
Detail of Planter and Steps




          ...
MKS FUTURES: CHALLENGING BOURGEOIS TRANSIT
Location: Manhattan, Kansas
Size: Regional Scale
Media: ArcGIS; AutoCad; Illust...
Jonathan Ryan Landscape Architecture Portfolio
Jonathan Ryan Landscape Architecture Portfolio
Jonathan Ryan Landscape Architecture Portfolio
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Jonathan Ryan Landscape Architecture Portfolio

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Portfolio of Jonathan Ryan, a 4th year non-baccalaureate MLA Student at Kansas State University

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  1. 1. Landscape Architecture Portfolio Kansas State University CONTACT INFORMATION: Permanent Address: JONATHAN 352 Highway EE Winfield, Missouri 63389 Local Address: 231 Putnam Hall M. RYAN Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Home Number: 636-668-8149 Cell Number: 636-295-6892 Email: jmryan@ksu.edu
  2. 2. ABOUT A look into my past will reveal the priceless experiences that have shaped my character, leadership abilities, and direction in life. I consider my family to be one of the foremost reasons for the strong foundation in my life. Throughout my childhood, my parents guided my steps teaching me the value of serving others within our church and community. My adolescent years allowed me the opportunity to slowly begin cutting some of the strings that bound me to them as a completely dependent child. Transitioning towards eventual independence as an adult, I was given the responsibility of setting an example for my two younger sisters. Setting an example for them did not mean being perfect. In fact, it was quite the opposite. Rather than being pretentious, the best way that I could be a role model for them was to genuinely lead as someone who has both good and bad days. In this way, they could see the real me and observe how I responded to and learned from life circumstances. My leadership skills continued to develop through my involvement with the Boy Scouts of America. The Boy Scouts taught me to be trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent in all areas of my life. These characteristics came into full fruition on the day that I attained the rank of Eagle Scout, the highest rank earned within the Boy Scouts. Before receiving this rank, I needed to complete an Eagle Scout Project that demonstrated the culmination of my leadership skills. My project consisted of meeting with the local city council to determine a landscaping plan for their newly built city hall. After ironing out all of the logistics between the city hall and the local nursery, I proceeded to supervise the installation of about thirty plants and the preparation of the landscaping beds around them. Obtaining the rank of Eagle Scout revealed much to me about myself. Most importantly, it taught me that I was able to start something and finish it. GRAPHITE RENDERING OF HALE LIBRARY ON VELLUM PAPER While in scouting, I also challenged myself to cultivate a business in lawn service. I began with only a couple of residential accounts. Eventually, my business grew to fifteen accounts including two commercial accounts. While running this small business, I kept track of my income and expenditures and was dependable to keep my scheduled weekly service. Committed to doing my best, this experience further impacted my character and ability for leadership as I realized the value of quality over mere quantity. Currently, I am attending Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas. In addition to pursuing a non-baccalaureate Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture, I am a student member of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). My intended degree is a professional degree requiring many long hours of dedication and focus. Throughout my studio classes, my projects reflect the same quality and consideration that I have previously put into my Eagle Scout Project and lawn care business. My transcript is proof that I am extremely efficient at managing my time and balancing all of the project deadlines given to me from each of my current and past courses. The projects illustrated within this portfolio are specifically selected and chronologically organized to tell my unique story. The values and principles that have molded my individual character have become the foundation for excelling as a future leader within the profession of landscape architecture.
  3. 3. FIRST YEAR STUDIO WORK Two words that effectively sum up my recipe for success in the first year studios are focus and consistency. Having a focused direction means setting and knowing what my goals and priorities are followed by an appropriate plan of action for obtaining these goals. Next to having a focus, consistency means doing my best with what I am given time and time again no matter the circumstances. Both of these words/ ideologies guided my efforts throughout the first year studios and are evidenced in my initial project work. Throughout my first year, many of the projects incorporated a high degree of abstractness. Geometry, proportion, axis, symmetry, hierarchy, and repetition are some of the fundamental ordering principles that I addressed within my project submissions. Instrument-aided drawings (orthographics, axonometrics, and single point perspectives) and models were the primary deliverables for each project. In addition to primary the design, I was continually evaluated on the space readability of my line hierarchy and the quality secondary space and craft of my models (See pages 2 and 3). Guided by a strong focus and consistency, I always sought to push my work to a level above the expectations of my instructors. The culmination of the abstract projects tertiary spaces undertaken in the first semester was the design of a small garden located atop a cliff overlooking the west coast of the United States. The golden rectangle proportion was used as the underlying PLAN OBLIQUES OF ABSTRACT CUBE: the skin of the cube surrounds three intersecting geometry for the site layout. Planting was used planes defining primary, secondary, and tertiary spaces. to create varying degrees of enclosure from space to space while reflecting pools and sight lines to prominent sculptures established the circulation and spatial hierarchy of the site. Drawings
  4. 4. ENVD 201 + 202 | Prof. Kingery-Page + Chambers | Fall 2006 + Spring 2007 ANALYSIS OF EXISTING SPACE: represents volume of space. ABSTRACT: degrees of enclosure and spatial extension. ABSTRACT: detail of cube. GARDEN DESIGN: emphasis on use of the golden rectangle proportion. GARDEN DESIGN: detail of entry space within garden. Models 3
  5. 5. HAND GRAPHICS In addition to my hard work ethic and desire to lead, being teachable is another trait that I possess. Unlike many students entering this field, I brought little confidence or experience in hand graphics. However, rather than letting this slow me down, I acknowledged that natural drawing ability was not one of my strengths and decided to invest the extra time needed to improve my visual communication skills. The graphics shown here were produced in a design graphics and visual thinking course. A large majority of the course focused on pen and ink sketches within my sketchbook. Techniques were also introduced for marker, colored pencil, and watercolor renderings. Many of the drawing and rendering skills learned within this course were directly applicable to the studio projects that I was working on at the time. My studio INK PEN ON SKETCH BOOK PAPER instructors required all final drawings in the second year to be hand rendered with the appropriate application of line weights and hierarchies for readability. Taos Summer Institute of Arts and Crafts, Washington Marlatt Park, and Kabul University Gateway are three projects within this portfolio where hand graphic skills are showcased. Each and every person has different areas of strength and weakness based upon natural talent and individual experience. Hand graphics is one area that has allowed me the opportunity to prove to myself that I can do anything I put my mind to, even if it does not come easy at first. To this day, I continue to explore ways in which I can better not only the technological skills of visual communication but also the artistic appeal INK PEN ON SKETCH BOOK PAPER of hand graphics. Sketching INK PEN ON SKETCH BOOK PAPER
  6. 6. LAR 310 | Design Graphics and Visual Thinking | Dean Law | Fall 2007 WATERCOLOR ON WATERCOLOR PAPER PEN + MARKER + COLORED PENCIL ON MARKER PAPER Rendering 5 PEN + MARKER ON MARKER PAPER
  7. 7. TAOS SUMMER INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND CRAFTS Location: Taos, New Mexico Size: 8.5 acres Media: SketchUP; Marker; Colored Pencil The rich context of the site provides panoramic views of the San Juan mountain range to the west, a sacred view of the mountains for the Pueblo Indians to the northeast, an adjacent stream corridor meandering roughly northeast to southwest, an eighty-foot tall cottonwood specimen tree, and a vast expanse of open sky yielding spectacular celestial phenomena during the night. Programmatically, this project forced me to make many design decisions about INITIAL CONCEPT INITIAL CONCEPT CLAY EXPLORATION appropriate adjacencies between uses. Some of the required elements in the program include a congregation hall, central exterior gathering space, five artisan studios, library, dining hall, swimming pool, and sleeping units with accompanying hygiene buildings. In addition to determining adjacencies between the individual parts of the program, I had to strategically consider what parts of the site context could enhance which building uses. Inspired by the genius loci surrounding the project’s site, I envision the proposed complex to act as an interactive, livable portal in which artisans can both relax and hone their creative skills while experiencing the invaluable views selectively framed by building mass. Initially, several concepts were sketched out and modeled quickly in clay. After selecting one of the schemes as the premise for an organizing geometry, more in depth studies of program adjacencies were undertaken. In all, this second year project introduced me to the notion of creating highly defined exterior INTERSECTING GRID CONCEPT GRAPHIC spaces as voids (ground) shaped by building mass (figure). Future projects have built upon this basic understanding of figure and ground. Process MIDCRIT CONCEPT
  8. 8. LAR 220 | Site Design Studio I | Prof. Clement and Kingery-Page | Fall 2007 gn SECTION B-B AERIAL PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF ENTRY Final Design 7 SITE PLAN SECTION A-A
  9. 9. WASHINGTON MARLATT PARK Location: Manhattan, Kansas Size: 160 acres Media: ArcGIS; SketchUP; Marker; Colored Pencil Each designer has a unique design process for how they arrive at a solution/proposal for a given problem. During the fall 2007 semester, I was introduced to the ecological design process developed by Ian McHarg in his book Design with Nature. For 3 ½ months, I inventoried and analyzed the park’s physiography, hydrology, geomorphology, soils, macroclimate, vegetation, wildlife, infrastructure, and zoning regulations. Additionally, I was introduced to ArcGIS, a powerful geospatial referencing computer program, that allowed me to run weighted suitability analyses for the location of park amenities. ASPECT ANALYSIS SLOPE ANALYSIS AMPHITHEATER SITE INVENTORY SUITABILITY Layering slope, aspect, soils, vegetation, and view shed analyses, I could make strategic design decisions about where the location of an amphitheater would be most appropriate. Using this design process, I was able to place the amphitheater in an area with existing slopes that were ideal for the intended use, with an aspect that oriented people away from looking directly into the sun, and that disturbed the least amount of native tallgrass prairie. In addition to McHarg’s design process, I learned the importance of working at multiple scales within a project. The design of the shelter incorporated strategies such as blocking harsh northern winds and allowing sunlight in during the winter while providing shade during the summer. These strategies were applicable for a INITIAL SKETCHES OF SHELTER small detail of the larger site, but I continually needed to move between scales to understand how the shelter design fit within the masterplan’s strategy of providing ADA access and visual Process points of interest throughout the park. CONCEPT FOR SHELTER AREA CONCEPT DIAGRAM
  10. 10. LAR 420 + LAR 220 | Natural Systems and Site Analysis + Site Design Studio I | Prof. Keane + Clement + Kingery-Page | Fall 2007 Studio u o rof. Kean ne Cl t K Kingery P Ki y Page AERIAL PERSPECTIVE OF SHELTER VIEW OF ENTRY SECTION A-A Final Design 9 MASTER PLAN DETAIL PLAN OF SHELTER LAYOUT
  11. 11. KABUL UNIVERSITY GATEWAY Location: Kabul, Afghanistan Size: 4 acres Media: SketchUP; Marker; Colored Pencil Identity and sense of place are two things that drove the design thinking for this project. In order to accurately capture both of these, I had to place myself within the Afghan culture and traditions through hours of research and personal inquiries of Afghan exchange students at Kansas State University. The process of understanding another culture other than my own was difficult, but rewarding. As a designer, I wanted to capture the university’s vision for its future within my proposal. The project’s program consisted of designing the primary entry experience into the university to include an iconic gateway and sequence of entry spaces. One of the major dilemmas pertained to resolving vehicular and pedestrian conflicts upon entering the site. Noting that most of the circulation into and throughout campus is pedestrian, my strategy was to widen the median between vehicular traffic lanes. Using small changes in elevation, I desired to create a series of pedestrian plazas terminating in the primary INITIAL CONCEPT MIDCRIT CONCEPT plaza. The series of plazas are organized along a visual axis anchored on either end by two large fountains. In the Afghan culture, water is highly celebrated As a result, these fountains activate movement along the sequence of entry spaces. Using the widened median for north to south pedestrian movement was appropriate; however, east to west connections presented a huge dilemma for the safety of pedestrians crossing the street. Strategies included using variable street widths to compress at crosswalks and release after the vehicle had passed. Also the REGIONAL SITE ANALYSIS continuous material and elevation of crosswalks across vehicular lanes provided drivers visual Process cues that the pedestrian had the right of way. SKETCH OF ENTRY FOR MIDCRIT CONCEPT
  12. 12. LAR 320 | Site Design Studio II | Prof. Kingery-Page + Klein | Spring 2008 Prof Kingery Page n p g AERIAL PERSPECTIVE SITE PLAN PARTI DIAGRAM VIEW FROM STREETSCAPE Final Design 11 SECTION A-A
  13. 13. SUMMER INTERNSHIP: FORUM STUDIO, INC. Refusing to stop my learning experience at the end of the 2008 spring semester, I worked as an intern for Forum Studio, a subsidiary of the Clayco Corporation located in St. Louis, Missouri. Having finished only two years of my education in landscape architecture made it difficult to obtain an internship; however, through much hard work in preparing a portfolio and interviewing, I was able to receive an internship and apply what skills I had to real world projects. In return, I was able to gain invaluable experience in a professional setting. Working under the only landscape architect at the firm meant that I had the opportunity to work on a wide variety of tasks. Tasks that I was responsible for included site visits, design development, production of graphic renderings and construction documents, plant selection, project meetings, and final punch lists. Upon starting the internship, I had some experience in AutoCAD and no experience in rendering with Photoshop. I pushed myself to learn more about these programs asking questions of those around me. The skills acquired in these programs challenged me to “push the envelope” of my graphic output once returning to school for the fall semester. In all, I discovered that networking and communication is the key to running a successful operation. While at Forum, I daily worked with architects, engineers, and contractors on projects. Being able to have intelligent conversations with other disciplines was necessary for accomplishing the task at hand. In order to be an effective leader in my future endeavors, I must work hard and have excellent networking and communication skills with those around me. PHOTOSHOP RENDERING OF PROJECT MASTERPLAN Corporate Design
  14. 14. Summer 2008 PLANTING SCHEDULE FOR PRESENTATION TO CLIENT Industrial Design 13
  15. 15. “REFUGE” Location: St. Louis, Missouri Size: 1.75 acres A Media: AutoCAD; Land F/X; Marker; Colored Pencil While on my internship during the summer of 2008, the Mississippi River swelled out of its banks endangering many cities and small towns adjacent to its floodplain. Night and day people within my hometown of Winfield, Missouri, stacked sand bags to reinforce the already saturated earthen levees. Unfortunately, after several days, the levees gave way and the floodwaters inundated a portion of town. LINE AERIAL VIEW FACING NORTH Returning to school that fall, I used this tragedy as an inspiration for the planting design of an urban park. Specifically, I desired to capture the metaphor of the refuge that exists behind a levee when floodwaters or other dangers exist. Initially, I began with a simple, abstract drawing of the intended metaphor. Circular forms represented the levee while linear strokes represented the impeding floodwaters. Next in the process, I developed the abstract drawing into a three dimensional model exploring how the metaphor could be strengthened. After that, FORM LINEAR CIRCULATION SPACE I constructed another model and accompanying drawings that took the abstract model to a level of reality as I began to introduce the spatial and AESTHETIC SITE PLAN A functional aspects of human scale. At this stage, the abstract forms transitioned into a variety of planting strategies: barrier, baffle, screen, etc. Next, I considered the aesthetics of the design assigning colors and textures to the plant material. The final stage of this design process was the selection of plant species that exhibited the functional and aesthetic characteristics that I had already specified in earlier stages. SPACE/FUNCTION SECTION A-A Throughout this process, I enjoyed the use of a metaphor as a design concept transforming an Planting Design abstract line drawing into a realistic place.
  16. 16. LAR 410 | Planting Design Studio | Prof. Skabelund + Winslow | Fall 2008 Code Botanical Name Common Name Height Spread Quantity Deciduous Trees AG Acer griseum Paperback Maple 20-30’ 20-30 2 OB Aesculus glabra Ohio Buckeye 20-40’ 20-40’ 2 CC Cercis canadensis Eastern Redbud 20-30’ 25-35’ 8 BW Salix babylonica Babylon Weeping Willow 30-40’ 30-40’ 1 ZS Zelkova serrata Japanese Zelkova 50-80’ 50-80’ 7 Evergreen Trees JV Juniperous virginiana ‘Canaertii’ Canaert Eastern Redcedar 20-30’ 8-20’ 14 PP Pinus peuce Balkan Pine 30-60’ 20-30’ 7 Deciduous Shrubs CJ Callicarpa japonica Japanese Beautyberry 4-6’ 4-6’ 17 EA Euonymus alatus ‘Compactus’ Compactus Winged Euonymus 5-10’ 5-10’ 28 GL Genista lydia Hardy Dwarf Broom 6-12” 110 PF Potentilla fruticosa ‘Tangerine’ Tangerine Shrubby Cinquefoil 1-4’ 2-4’ 43 SB Spiraea x bumalda ‘Goldflame’ Goldflame Bumald Spirea 4-5’ 3-5’ 101 VO Viburnum opulus European Cranberrybush Viburnum 8-10’ 10-15’ 2 Evergreen Shrubs PA Picea abies ‘Nidiformis’ Bird’s Nest Spruce 3-6’ 3-6’ 6 PM Pinus mugo var. mughus Mugo Pine 5-8’ 10-16’ 8 Ground Covers PT Pachysandra terminalis Pachysandra, Japanese Spurge 6-10” 36” 2376 Turfs FA Festuca arundinacea var. Duster Duster Tall Fescue 3” Mowed 17,153 sf. PLANT SCHEDULE PLANTING PLAN 0’ 5’ 10’ 20’ 40’ Plant Selection 15 GRASS AMPHITHEATER OPEN PLAZA
  17. 17. CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS Client: Doane College Location: Crete, Nebraska Size: 5 acres Media: AutoCAD; Microsoft Excel As I have progressed in my education, time management has become increasingly vital to my success. With the start of the fall 2008 semester, I began the Land Construction sequence. Lasting three semesters, this sequence has prepared me with the technical knowledge needed to build the designs that I propose. Moreover, it has introduced me to the workflow of professional practice: schematic design, design development, construction documentation, bid administration, and construction administration. During Construction I, skills that I developed included: • Proposal contract writing • Surveying • Campus design • Grading • Average depth earthwork estimation • Contour area earthwork estimation • End area earthwork estimation The focus of Construction I revolved largely around technical grading. Achieving optimal percentages of slope for the various site components, proved to be a challenge. After calculating many spot elevations across the site, I was able to interpolate where the contours should go to make the design both feasible and ADA compliant. I learned how important the technical grading plan was as I estimated the total amounts of cut and fill in later earthwork estimation tasks. Ideally, I would want to have a balance between cut and fill so that expensive hauling costs would not be imposed on the client. Earthwork Diagram
  18. 18. LAR 438 | Land Construction I | Prof. Winslow | Fall 2008 6” TOPSOIL REPLACED 4” CONCRETE WALK BUILDING FOUNDATION FFE = 1437.50 4” CONCRETE WALK 4” CONCRETE WALK 4” ASPHALT 6” TOPSOIL REPLACED 2” SAND SUBBASE CALCULATIONS EXCLUDING BUILDING FOUNDATION* SECTION 4+09.42 SUBCUT AREA (sq. ft.) SUBFILL AREA (sq.ft.) AREA OF "K" (sq. ft.) C1 6,836.76 F1 143.73 K1 0.00 8” AB3 GRAVEL SUBBASE 2” SAND SUBBASE C2 4,006.92 F2 K2 C3 F3 K3 C4 F4 K4 2” SAND SUBBASE TOTAL SUBCUT 10,843.68 TOTAL SUBFILL 143.73 Total K Area 0.00 adjusted for TOTAL "K" 10,843.68 RAISED PLANTER WITH FOOTING Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 CORRECTED SUBCUT (sq. ft.) CORRECTED SUBFILL (sq.ft.) 1,084.37 14.37 2” SAND SUBBASE 4” ASPHALT =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. 8” AB3 GRAVEL SUBBASE *NOTED IN ABOVE SECTION WITH BLDG LINE SECTION 4+09.42 SUBCUT AREA (sq. ft.) SUBFILL AREA (sq.ft.) AREA OF "K" (sq. ft.) C1 7,378.71 F1 615.12 K1 0.00 C2 4,006.92 F2 K2 C3 F3 K3 C4 F4 K4 TOTAL SUBCUT 11,385.63 TOTAL SUBFILL 615.12 Total K Area 0.00 adjusted for TOTAL "K" 11,385.63 Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 CORRECTED SUBCUT (sq. ft.) CORRECTED SUBFILL (sq.ft.) 1,138.56 61.51 =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. SECTIONS CORRECTED AVERAGE SUBCUT AREA (sq. DISTANCE SUBCUT VOLUME (cu. SUBCUT VOLUME SUBCUT AREA ft.) BETWEEN ft.) (cu. yd.) (sq. ft.) = (Sta1+Sta2) / 2 SECTIONS =Avg Cut Area * Dist. =Cut Volume / 27 4+09.42 1,138.56 1,461.32 60.06 87,766.88 3,250.63 4+69.48 1,784.07 SECTIONS CORRECTED AVERAGE SUBFILL AREA (sq. DISTANCE SUBFILL VOLUME SUBFILL VOLUME SUBFILL AREA ft.) BETWEEN (cu. ft.) (cu. yd.) (sq. ft.) = (Sta1+Sta2) / 2 SECTIONS =Fill Volume / 27 4+09.42 61.51 30.76 60.06 1,847.45 68.42 4+69.48 0.00 4” ASPHALT DRIVE 4” CONCRETE WALK 4” ASPHALT DRIVE 6” TOPSOIL REPLACED 8” AB3 GRAVEL SUBBASE 8” AB3 GRAVEL SUBBASE 2” SAND SUBBASE SECTION 4+69.48 SUBCUT AREA (sq. ft.) SUBFILL AREA (sq.ft.) AREA OF "K" (sq. ft.) C1 17,840.71 F1 0.00 K1 0.00 C2 F2 K2 C3 F3 K3 C4 F4 K4 TOTAL SUBCUT 17,840.71 TOTAL SUBFILL 0.00 Total K Area 0.00 adjusted for TOTAL "K" 17,840.71 Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 Section Vertical Exaggeration 10.00 CORRECTED SUBCUT (sq. ft.) CORRECTED SUBFILL (sq.ft.) 1,784.07 0.00 =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. =Total Cut / Vert.Exag. SECTIONS CORRECTED AVERAGE SUBCUT AREA (sq. DISTANCE SUBCUT VOLUME (cu. SUBCUT VOLUME SUBCUT AREA ft.) BETWEEN ft.) (cu. yd.) (sq. ft.) = (Sta1+Sta2) / 2 SECTIONS =Avg Cut Area * Dist. =Cut Volume / 27 4+69.48 1,784.07 892.04 60.36 53,843.53 1,994.20 5+29.84 0.00 SECTIONS CORRECTED AVERAGE SUBFILL AREA (sq. DISTANCE SUBFILL VOLUME SUBFILL VOLUME SUBFILL AREA ft.) BETWEEN (cu. ft.) (cu. yd.) (sq. ft.) = (Sta1+Sta2) / 2 SECTIONS =Fill Volume / 27 4+69.48 0.00 0.00 60.36 0.00 0.00 5+29.84 0.00 End Area Earthwork Estimation 17
  19. 19. CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS Client: Doane College Location: Crete Nebraska Size: 5 acres Media: AutoCAD During Construction II, skills that I developed included: • Layout and dimensioning • Planting design • Irrigation • Lighting and electrical • Construction details and specifications Attention to detail is crucial when determining the success of the project. My design drawings can be beautiful, illustrative depictions of what a space could be like; however, without clearly communicating the appropriate materials and methods for its construction, the end product can be disappointing. For instance, the layout of the parking lot bays was extremely important in my design for the proposed indoor recreation and athletic facility at Doane College. If the contractor did not measure off of the established baselines and center the parking islands with each other, the intended visual experience upon moving through the site would be lost. The value of clearly communicating applies for the general site layout and dimensioning as well as the custom details that give the design its uniqueness. Construction Details
  20. 20. LAR 439 | Land Construction II | Prof. Hahn | Spring 2009 Layout and Dimensioning 19
  21. 21. NINTH AND COLORADO REDEVELOPMENT - MASTERPLAN Location: Denver, Colorado Size: 32 acres Media: SketchUP; AutoCad; Illustrator; Photoshop Urban design is a field in landscape architecture that both excites and challenges me. I find the many complex ecological, social, cultural, and economic systems to be the premier testing grounds for new creative assemblages. During the spring 2009 semester, I had the opportunity to take part in a sponsored urban design studio. As a part of this sponsorship, my studio traveled to Denver, Colorado, where we took part in an initial site visit and accompanying charette for our semester long project. This experience marked a major milestone in my education. Previous studio projects could be EXISTING FIGURE GROUND PROPOSED CIRCULATION largely characterized as greenfield development. Now I would have the chance to rethink how an abandoned 32 acre greyfield could be redeveloped into a new cultural and economic center. The driving concept for the proposed masterplan is the idea of activating a sequence of corridors and adjacent spaces throughout the site. Using strategic building massing and land use, this design invites the surrounding communities to take part in an urban center contrasting the current “super block” organization pattern. Along the intended route throughout the development, building setbacks are greater allowing for restaurants and retail stores to take advantage of a highly comfortable streetscape. In addition, the heights of buildings are lowest near the corridor increasing in density and MODEL PARTI height towards the northwest and southeast of the site. Land use reinforces primary circulation along the intended route by placing retail and entertainment activities along the adjacent Process streetscapes.
  22. 22. LAR 442 | Site Planning and Design Studio | Prof. Belanger + Hunt | Spring 2009 PROPOSED CIRCULATION PROPOSED LAND USE VEHICULAR CIRCULATION PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION SITE KEY: Hale Parkway A. Central Open Space B. Corporate Center C. University of Colorado Bridge D. Bioresearch Building J. E. Nurse’s Dormitory G. Clermont Street F. Existing Honey Locust Allee Bellaire Street Birch Street G. Open Plaza H. Residential Courtyard Ash Street I. Civic Building J. Historical Walk Albion Street E East 11th Avenue H. BUILDING HEIGHTS Low: 1-3 stories Medium: 4-6 stories High: 6+ stories East 10th Avenue J. B. A. H. C. East 9th Avenue D. E. Civic Drive Colorado Boulevard J. H. LAND USE G. Residential Retail/Shopping and Dining Corporate Office F. East 8th Avenue Civic Mixed Use Rose Medical Center Parking Structure JONATHAN RYAN Final Design 21 MASTER PLAN SCALE: 1” = 100’ MASTERPLAN 0’ 50’ 100’ 200’ 400’ SPRING 2009 LAR 442 / BELANGER and HUNT
  23. 23. NINTH AND COLORADO REDEVELOPMENT - DETAIL AREA Location: Denver, Colorado Size: 5 Acres Media: SketchUP; AutoCad; Illustrator; Photoshop The final seven weeks of the spring 2009 semester consisted of selecting a specific area within the proposed masterplan to develop in detail. I selected the proposed community center where two primary routes of pedestrian movement converge. Additionally, this area encompasses the community’s civic building, CONTEXTUAL BUILDING HEIGHTS central plaza, and open greenspace that together, successfully activate the proposed development as the new social, cultural and economic center for the surrounding areas. Three key ideas that are important to the proposed design are form, connection/approach, and a spatial/programmatic dichotomy. First, the form of the proposed design was inspired by Denver’s historical cycle of expansion and recession. Considering the cross section of a ELEVATION CHANGE EXPLORATION CONCEPTUAL PHOTO MONTAGE tree, I sought to draw a parallel from the annual rings of growth and Denver’s historical booms and busts. Second, connection/approach was considered through the placement of the tower off axis with pedestrian routes, the extension of pedestrian materials across vehicular routes, and the varying rhythm of vertical movement as one enters the plaza from different directions. Finally, a spatial/programmatic dichotomy is proposed between the open greenspace and central plaza. The dichotomy is clearly ACCESSIBILITY EXPLORATION emphasized through the material selection of ground plane (hardscape vs. softscape) and the activities programmed for each. INITIAL CONCEPTUAL SKETCH Process
  24. 24. LAR 442 | Site Planning and Design Studio | Prof. Belanger + Hunt | Spring 2009 Detail of Planter and Steps Planters direct circulation Views out while allowing views over to effectively Red Granite increase spatial Pavers continuity across the site. 3’ 0” 18” 0 0’ .5’ 1’ 2’ 4’ Red Brick 7’ 0” Travertine Stone DETAIL OF PLANTER AND STEPS APPROACHING FROM THE WEST G. D East Tenth Avenue B. F. Birch Street Ash Street H. K. ELEVATION B-B C1 Site Key: I. A. Central Plaza B. Primary Open Green Space C. C. Linear Promenade A L. A. A1 D. Retail / Entertainment Connection E. Iconic Tower J. F. F. Community Civic Building I. G. Existing Parking Garage I. H. Retail Fronted Colonade I. Outdoor Dining Terrace I. D1 J. Sculpture Plaza K. ADA Accessible Walkway L. Area of Detail Material Selection: Red Granite Pavers 1 B B Historic Brick Pavers Taken from Previous Buildings Located On-site C1 Travertine Stone East Ninth Avenue Slate Pavers Colored Concrete Final Design Wood Planks 0’ 7.5’ 60’ D. Turf 23 SITE PLAN
  25. 25. MKS FUTURES: CHALLENGING BOURGEOIS TRANSIT Location: Manhattan, Kansas Size: Regional Scale Media: ArcGIS; AutoCad; Illustrator; Photoshop Following my third year in the LA program, I was required to take an eight week long summer studio and associated seminar for graduate LEGEND: credit. The focus of the collaborative studio Areas Excluded from Dev. revolved around community planning issues facing Manhattan, KS, due to the increase in Grasslands population expected to result from the incoming Future City Limit National Bio-Agro Defense Facility (NBAF) Current City Limit and Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) expanding Fort Riley. The statement below City Limits describes the key issues/dilemmas that my team KSU Property sought to address. Major Arterial Divisions “With a population exceeding 50,000 people, Freeway Manhattan, Kansas has quickly approached an important transportation threshold that will Major Arterial POTENTIAL SPRAWL A CITY DIVIDED forever impact the city’s identity. Previously Arterial planned for the automobile as the dominant Collector mode of transit, the city lacks community Local connections across its two major arterial corridors. Additionally, few streets provide bike Existing Bike Routes lanes or consistent sidewalks. As we approach Sidewalk Gaps this threshold, new ideas that rethink the multifunctional potential of streets and their adjacent land uses must challenge the bourgeois use of streets by traffic engineers.” Bourgeois is a rather evocative term meaning the conventional practices put forth by traffic engineers for classifying corridors based solely the vehicle. We wanted to make a bold statement with our title that woke people up to the flaws of “business as usual.” Strategies for routing where different forms of transit followed specific corridors included BOURGEOIS STREET CLASSIFICATION INADEQUATE ALTERNATIVES TO THE AUTOMOBILE existing population densities, existing and proposed centers, existing right of ways, Dilemmas walkability, and common linkages.

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