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m-learning9 m-learning9 Presentation Transcript

  • 9 - MOBILE DEVICES IN THE CONTENT AREAS Mobile Learning @ NCSU
  • KOLB; CHAPTER 5Look back to chapter 5, which includes lesson plansfor specific subject areas as well as more generalservices you can repurpose for your content areaThe subjects for which there are specific servicesare: foreign langauges, english, social studies, science,mathematics, and business and economics
  • REPURPOSINGRepurposing is something we do a lot as teachers,maybe without realizing we’re doing itWe do this because many technologies are notnecessarily educational technologies
  • REPURPOSING; EXAMPLESUsing a blog service like Blogger or Wordpress forstudents to share essays or class projectsUsing phones to record scientific data, interviews orperformancesUsing Dropbox delivery services to collect studentwork
  • CONTENT AREASThink of the times you’ve heard a great idea from ateacher in a different content area, and repurposed itfor your classroom and studentsMany of the apps in this next section will be in areasother than your own - but feel free to repurpose anyof these ideas for yours
  • ENGLISH; VOCABThe 2008 article by Lu from The Author investigatedwhether students can learn vocabulary from SMS(text) messagesTeachers may recognize that if you ask students to textit, they’ll do anything for youTherefore, leveraging SMS for educational purposes isan interesting idea
  • VOCAB; LEARNINGLike much of the prior research, the authors discussthe affordances of mobile devices in educationAt the site of this research, in Taiwan, students areexposed to English only in English class - therefore,the ability for students to learn outside of school atanytime is an applicable affordance of mobile devices
  • VOCAB; CONSIDERATIONSLearning from mobile devices faces challenges: smallscreen, and a line-by-line reading strategySo, researchers chose a simple approach to learningvocabulary with words and their paired definitions
  • VOCAB; PROCEDURESHigh school students who had not previously usedSMS to learn were given a pre-test questionairre anda vocabulary testStudents received messages twice per day, each timeconsidered a “lesson”, during commuting time - tooptimize the chances students would read the texts
  • VOCAB; PROCEDURES AND RESULTSEach lesson contained two words, among a total of 28students required for a college entrance examThe lesson included the Chinese translation, and thesyntactic category to which the vocabulary wordbelongedCompared to students who learned vocabularywithout SMS, those who learned with SMSdemonstrated greater achievement
  • VOCAB; WHAT DID STUDENTS THINK?The most common positive comment concernedbeing able to learn anywhere, followed by funThe most common negative comment was that themedium was not easy to use, followed by notenough supporting content
  • MATHThe 2008 article by Franklin and Peng from theJournal of Computing in Higher Education describesresearch into the iPod Touch for helping middleschool students learn algebra
  • MATHThe authors stress a common theme: mobile devicesprovide a constant connection to the digital worldMiddle school students created which they couldlater use to study algebra - the purpose of thisresearch was to investigate the effects and usefulnessof the process of creating videos, and the videosthemselves
  • MATH; RESULTSResearchers found that students needed a lot oftechnical support, for issues ranging from charging thedevices to unblocking websites prohibited by theschool firewallStudents recognized that creating math videos was asmuch about the math content as the technology theyused - but students also benefited from reviewing theconcepts
  • MATH; RESULTSStudents watched the videos outside of classTeachers reflected that the videos were useful, andthe iPods engaged studentsOther faculty in the school were encouraged by thevideos’ creationFaculty requested greater professional developmentin the use of mobile technology
  • MATH; WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?This study pertains to math teachers because mathcontent may seem to present a challenge to mobilelearningThe iPods and math videos provided the hook andengaged student’s interestsTherefore, teachers of other subject areas shouldnotice the repurposing at play - did the videospromote student learning?
  • SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICSThe app Acoustic Ruler uses sound to measuredistances, between the phone and an object orbetween two phonesCheckout the embedded videos on the AcousticRuler site - this could be useful for a variety ofscience and mathematics classes
  • SCIENCEAs we discussed in the former section, think of waysstudents can record scientific data with mobiledevices daily pictures of plant’s growing video recording of a chemical reaction and physics experiments audio or video from field studies
  • SCIENCEThe 2009 paper by Liu, Peng, Wu and Lin inEducational Technology & Society investigateddesigning mobile learning for the 5E learning cycleand determining their success, and exploring student’sperceptions toward the activities
  • SCIENCEThe significance of this research is its amalgamation ofdesigning for mobile learning, and the 5E learningcycle5E learning cycle: hands-on, inquiry-based scienceteaching method
  • SCIENCE; 5EThe five E’s in the 5E learning cycle are:1. Engagement - introduce a new topic2. Exploration - provide activities for students3. Explanation - give an opportunity to demonstrate understanding4. Elaboration - challenge and expand student’s ideas5. Evaluation - assess student progress
  • SCIENCE; MOBILE DESIGNPast research has shown that mobile learningsupports inquiry-based learning, like the typeencouraged by the 5E learning cycle pedagogy4th grade students in Taiwan were provided with amobile device (tabletPC) and a supporting website towhich students connected
  • SCIENCE; ACTIVITIES AND RESULTSStudents engaged in activities that corresponded to thedifferent parts of the 5E learning cycleBased on a knowledge test given before and after themobile learning activities - students were better able toidentify aquatic plantsThe researchers suggest that the hands-on experiencecoupled with support from the website accessed frommobile devices allowed students to correct theirmisconceptions
  • SCIENCE; WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN?Student’s scored higher on questions that askedabout aquatic plants students observed in-person andthrough their mobile devicesThe students liked using the mobile devices and weremotivated to learn - they were more hands-on andpersonalMobile devices might help students by supportingtheir learning and doing science in real-time
  • ENGLISH/SOCIAL STUDIESA blog is especially well-suited to English and socialstudies classesStudents like to have a digital place of their ownonline - you may find your students using your Englishblog to share coursework from other subjectsThe best site for student blogging does therepurposing for you - Edublogs
  • HISTORY; RED, WHITE AND BLACKThe app Red, White and Black from NC State grewfrom campus talks and walking tours and highlightsstudents, staff and faculty who created opportunitiesfor African AmericansThe app contains audio, video and important eventsfrom NC State history - it’s designed to augment atour across campus, but could also be used in yourclassroom
  • HISTORY; RED, WHITE AND BLACKThe app is available for iPhone and iPad
  • HISTORY; RED, WHITE AND BLACKThis app touches on a number of elements we’vediscussed: the power of location-based services augmenting the physical world with digital tools
  • HISTORYOne characteristic of project-based learning is thatstudents can do work they want to doThere is historical data available free and online forstudents to access with mobile devices
  • ARTThe Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New YorkCity produced excellent iOS and Android apps
  • ARTThe iOS/Android phone apps provides a calendar andguided tours for MoMA visitors, as well as an index ofall the content and artists at the MoMAThe iPad Art Lab app allows students to create worksof artCheckout art created with the iPad app: http://www.moma.org/explore/mobile/artlabapp#
  • ART; REFLECTINGThink back to something we’ve discussed earlier thatis related to the Art Lab app: augmenting the physical with digital can be powerful for students - but the digital doesn’t necessarily replace physical art