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Exploring the potential of a place-based
Augmented Reality (AR) game to support
historical inquiry
James Mathews
Universit...
Augmented Reality Games - The Basics
Played on a PDA/handheld
computer or smart phone
that is equipped
with a GPS unit.
The “Game Space”
The games are played
in the physical
environment.
The GPS tracks your
location as you explore
the “game s...
Location Sensitive Content
What do AR games borrow from video games?
Role-playing / Differentiated Roles
Narrative Hook / Backstory
Problem Space / M...
Current Study: How might AR games be used
to build students’ capacity to
think empathetically?
Dow Day
October 18, 1967
A Place-based
AR Game
Game Context - “Contested Space”
Dow Chemical Company makes napalm
Dow Chemical plans to recruit students on the UW-Madiso...
The Mission
“Things are heating up on
Bascom Hill and we need a
story, and some photos by
3:00. Get up there and check
thi...
Game Play
As students play the games they
use the PDA to…
Explore the
physical environment
Meet and interview
virtual char...
Game-based Learning (Gee, 2003; Squire, 2007; Shaffer, 2006)
Historical Empathy / Perspective Taking
* Conceptualizing (Ba...
Intervention: 10-Day Game-based Curriculum
Phase Activities Sample:
1. Pre-game Generate initial inquiry
question(s)
Backg...
* 9 High School Students (2 Girls, 7 Boys)
* 7 failed at least one semester of U.S. History
* Reluctant readers in school-...
Data & Analysis
What did I look at?
* Artifacts that students created (journal, historical analysis sheets, news article)
...
1. Increased student motivation to complete pre- and post-game
reading, writing, and historical interpretation / analysis ...
5. Provided a space for “unpacking” the values at play
6. Newspaper article helped students move away from their own
posit...
Future Work?
1) Next iteration of Dow Day
2) Students (and teachers) designing AR games
3) AR games as assessment tools
Thanks
Contact Info
James Mathews
jmmathew@wisc.edu
Augmented Reality
Curriculum Overview
Played as part of a 10 day curriculum
Role play as a journalist
Investigate the event in “real time”
D...
Augmented Reality Gaming on Handhelds, 1st
year Report
November 29, 2006
Lake Wingra
(Madison)
Mad City Mystery
(Madison)
...
Summer:
Teacher
Workshops
Fall:
implementations
Curriculum
design
Winter:
Redesign
Spring:
Implementations
Project
Refinem...
A Sample Encounter
• Place-based historical
simulation
• Inquiry-based model
• Engages students in
“historical thinking”
(Wineburg,VanSledrig...
Sample Encounter
Description: You feel a buzzing in
your backpack. You take out your
Communicator, and tune in. It's
John ...
Presentations should represent on the average a 7-10
minute summary of the paper. Highlights may be
given covering such po...
Moving towards place specific games
xml
Game Editor
(xml generator)
Moving towards teacher and student designed games
Historical Inquiry Game AERA 2009
Historical Inquiry Game AERA 2009
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Historical Inquiry Game AERA 2009

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  • Covering TWO MAIN things
    Who am I?
    What are AR games?
    3) Dow Day --> designed to support hist inquiry and hist empathy
    4) Hard to fit it all it in…
  • Remediating the place
  • Not JUST A TOUR
    Key points related to game-based learning
  • Primarily create science / scientific thinking games / argumentation
  • Side project
  • KEY = embedded in a curricular unit
  • Not JUST A TOUR
    Key points related to game-based learning
  • Covering TWO MAIN things
    Who am I?
    What are AR games?
    2) Dow Day --> AR Game for historical inquiry and historical empathy
    3) Build games for scientific thinking
  • Transcript of "Historical Inquiry Game AERA 2009"

    1. 1. Exploring the potential of a place-based Augmented Reality (AR) game to support historical inquiry James Mathews University of Wisconsin Local Games Lab Games, Learning, and Society Research Group
    2. 2. Augmented Reality Games - The Basics Played on a PDA/handheld computer or smart phone that is equipped with a GPS unit.
    3. 3. The “Game Space” The games are played in the physical environment. The GPS tracks your location as you explore the “game space.”
    4. 4. Location Sensitive Content
    5. 5. What do AR games borrow from video games? Role-playing / Differentiated Roles Narrative Hook / Backstory Problem Space / Master Goal / Sub-Tasks Multi-modal Content Collaboration / Competition Contested Spaces (Squire, 2004; Gee, 2003; Shaffer, 2006; Dickey, 2005)
    6. 6. Current Study: How might AR games be used to build students’ capacity to think empathetically?
    7. 7. Dow Day October 18, 1967 A Place-based AR Game
    8. 8. Game Context - “Contested Space” Dow Chemical Company makes napalm Dow Chemical plans to recruit students on the UW-Madison campus Some students plan protests aimed at blocking the interviews…
    9. 9. The Mission “Things are heating up on Bascom Hill and we need a story, and some photos by 3:00. Get up there and check things out.” “I set up an appointment with an administrator from the UW and a representative from Dow Chemical. They will meet you in front of Bascom Hall. Make sure that you meet them on time.” “Got all that? You better hurry…”” You are a reporter working for the Capital Times. Your editor just called and told you to meet him at the Memorial Union. He has an important story for you to cover. He has arranged for a photographer to help you cover the story. The Editor
    10. 10. Game Play As students play the games they use the PDA to… Explore the physical environment Meet and interview virtual characters View photos and video clips Gather and read primary documents Take on roles + collaborate with other players
    11. 11. Game-based Learning (Gee, 2003; Squire, 2007; Shaffer, 2006) Historical Empathy / Perspective Taking * Conceptualizing (Barton & Levstik, 2004; Davis, Yeager, & Foster, 2001) * Designing for (Portal, 1998; Foster, 2001; Foster & Yeager, 1998) * Assessing (Downey, 1995; Kohlmeier, 2006; Jensen, 2008) Design / Theoretical Framework(s) Historical Empathy Game-based Learning
    12. 12. Intervention: 10-Day Game-based Curriculum Phase Activities Sample: 1. Pre-game Generate initial inquiry question(s) Background / Context Start inquiry journal Introduce heuristics (corroboration, sourcing, contextualizing) 2. Game Enter roles “Situate” experience Introduce complexities “Simulate” event Investigate in “real time” Explore multiple perspective 3. Build on game experience React Revisit inquiry questions Review game text and documents Select and interpret new evidence Practice heuristics 4. Synthesize Reconstruction / Narrative Write newspaper article Choose photos to run with your story 5. Game design session Critique / “re-design” Analyze bias and propose additional perspectives, experiences, + resources
    13. 13. * 9 High School Students (2 Girls, 7 Boys) * 7 failed at least one semester of U.S. History * Reluctant readers in school-based context * Limited background using document-based learning * Limited contextual understanding Participants
    14. 14. Data & Analysis What did I look at? * Artifacts that students created (journal, historical analysis sheets, news article) * Pre- and post-historical inquiry tasks * Pre- and post-surveys * Interviews * Classroom observations What did I look for? * Recognize that the past is different from the present * Understand the context under which the historical events took place * Recognize that there are various perspectives from the past * Use historical evidence when making argument * Recognize their own positionality and how it shapes their interpretation (Downey, 1995; Kohlmeier, 2006; Jensen, 2008)
    15. 15. 1. Increased student motivation to complete pre- and post-game reading, writing, and historical interpretation / analysis activities 2. Students identified (with increasing complexity) the multiple perspectives surrounding the events. 3. Students “cared about” the events/actors, which increased engagement, but interfered with historical empathy 4. Playing a site-based simulation impacted the types of questions students asked --> The place became a source of evidence. 5. Students struggled to think of the past as different Results
    16. 16. 5. Provided a space for “unpacking” the values at play 6. Newspaper article helped students move away from their own positionality and focused them on the use of evidence 7. Students developed a more nuanced understanding of photographic evidence as a “construction of reality” 8. Growth in students’ ability to use heuristics to interpret historical documents Results
    17. 17. Future Work? 1) Next iteration of Dow Day 2) Students (and teachers) designing AR games 3) AR games as assessment tools
    18. 18. Thanks Contact Info James Mathews jmmathew@wisc.edu
    19. 19. Augmented Reality
    20. 20. Curriculum Overview Played as part of a 10 day curriculum Role play as a journalist Investigate the event in “real time” Develop basic news reporting skills Explore point of view and bias in news reporting
    21. 21. Augmented Reality Gaming on Handhelds, 1st year Report November 29, 2006 Lake Wingra (Madison) Mad City Mystery (Madison) South Shore Beach (Milwaukee) Greenbush (Madison) Hip Hop Tycoon Place specific Place agnostic Urban Ecology Center (Milwaukee) Dow Day Mystery Trip
    22. 22. Summer: Teacher Workshops Fall: implementations Curriculum design Winter: Redesign Spring: Implementations Project Refinement STAR Schools Grant • 3 years • 30 teachers in Madison, Milwaukee, Boston • Improving mathematics and literacy skills
    23. 23. A Sample Encounter
    24. 24. • Place-based historical simulation • Inquiry-based model • Engages students in “historical thinking” (Wineburg,VanSledright) Interpreting primary and secondary resources Identifying and analyzing multiple perspectives surrounding an historical event Gathering evidence and developing historical arguments Design Principles • Played as part of a larger curricular unit
    25. 25. Sample Encounter Description: You feel a buzzing in your backpack. You take out your Communicator, and tune in. It's John Martin. His face is scratched and bloody, battered and bruised. Interview: Whoa! I didn't think I'd get you! This Communicator is whacked pretty badly. Hello? Hello? Can you hear me? Well, it says it's transmitting, so if you can hear me, listen up. I'm not sure what's going on, but don't come back to camp! And stay low! After you left, camp was overrun by men in green tights. We tried to fend them off. There were five John From “Mitchville: Where the War Began”
    26. 26. Presentations should represent on the average a 7-10 minute summary of the paper. Highlights may be given covering such points as the purpose of the study, description of the sample, methodology, problems, and major findings, conclusions, or recommendations. The amount of time devoted to each highlight will vary according to the author’s evaluation of the importance of each area to the paper.
    27. 27. Moving towards place specific games xml Game Editor (xml generator)
    28. 28. Moving towards teacher and student designed games
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