<ul><li>SURGE CAPACITY MANAGEMENT </li></ul><ul><li>The University of South Alabama </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Strategic...
What is Surge Capacity? <ul><li>The ability of a healthcare system to rapidly expand beyond normal services. </li></ul><ul...
Why plan for Surge? The U.S. healthcare system, overall, is woefully unprepared to effectively handle large numbers of cas...
Surge Drivers “ Lives hang in the balance – it’s not business as usual… ” <ul><li>Healthcare Facility Surge: 20% of staffe...
Surge Capacity vs. Capability <ul><li>Surge Capacity:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ability to evaluate and care for a marke...
Surge Assumptions <ul><li>Healthcare facilities will stand alone for 48 – 72 hours: </li></ul><ul><li>No forward movement ...
Our Goal <ul><li>To have an organized and coordinated response to mass casualty events to maximize the numbers of lived sa...
Our Challenge <ul><li>Surge capacity events will challenge the usual standards of care and produce difficult leadership de...
Overcoming Challenges and Meeting Our Goal <ul><li>What do planners need to know to develop plans for effective response <...
For Our Health “ system” <ul><li>Develop event specific and general guidance for allocating medical resources. </li></ul><...
And <ul><li>Evaluate local, state, and federal laws. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop practical tools for verifying credentials. ...
Finally Get everyone to the table including during exercises and disaster response.
 
Surge Capacity: Domains <ul><li>Pre-Hospital </li></ul><ul><li>CHCs and physician offices </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare Fac...
Alternate Facilities <ul><li>On Hospital Campus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Office Buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Volunteer Health Care Providers <ul><li>Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) </li></ul><ul><li>Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DM...
Community Surge Checklists <ul><li>Identify alternate care sites and care partners. </li></ul><ul><li>MOUs for use of site...
Sample NIMS  Resources Management Checklist: <ul><li>Does your jurisdiction have: </li></ul><ul><li>A developed method of ...
<ul><li>Compacts -  not   Contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Offers of Assistance for: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>staff,  </li...
<ul><li>Should be regional and beyond your back door - (find someone not in the same boat); </li></ul><ul><li>Include how ...
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Surge Capacity Management

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Surge Capacity Management

  1. 1. <ul><li>SURGE CAPACITY MANAGEMENT </li></ul><ul><li>The University of South Alabama </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Strategic Health Innovation </li></ul>© University of South Alabama Center For Strategic Health Innovation. All Rights Reserved. These slides are a part of the ARRTC program and cannot be reproduced for commercial purposes.
  2. 2. What is Surge Capacity? <ul><li>The ability of a healthcare system to rapidly expand beyond normal services. </li></ul><ul><li>The need to meet sudden or sustained increased demand for medical care. </li></ul><ul><li>The demand to meet public health resource needs in response to a disaster or large-scale event. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why plan for Surge? The U.S. healthcare system, overall, is woefully unprepared to effectively handle large numbers of casualties caused by Weapons of Mass Destruction or natural disasters such as infectious disease outbreaks.
  4. 4. Surge Drivers “ Lives hang in the balance – it’s not business as usual… ” <ul><li>Healthcare Facility Surge: 20% of staffed beds – expedite D/C and cancel electives. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Surge: Alternate Care Facilities/CHCs. </li></ul><ul><li>Public Health Surge: Mass vaccination and medication distribution. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Requires capability, not just capacity” </li></ul>
  5. 5. Surge Capacity vs. Capability <ul><li>Surge Capacity: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ability to evaluate and care for a markedly increased volume of patients - one that challenges or exceeds normal operating capacity. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Surge Capability: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The ability to manage patients requiring unusual or very specialized medical evaluation and care, e.g., infectious disease or burn patients. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Surge Assumptions <ul><li>Healthcare facilities will stand alone for 48 – 72 hours: </li></ul><ul><li>No forward movement of patients in the initial 72 hours; only limited redistribution of patients to available medical resources likely – even less likely if a contagious event ! </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery of surge demand care will be needed in addition to delivery of basic services, e.g. labor/ delivery, dialysis, cardiac, etc… </li></ul>
  7. 7. Our Goal <ul><li>To have an organized and coordinated response to mass casualty events to maximize the numbers of lived saved. </li></ul><ul><li>To seek first local and regional response from the community provider networks </li></ul>
  8. 8. Our Challenge <ul><li>Surge capacity events will challenge the usual standards of care and produce difficult leadership decisions on allocating scarce resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Surge capacity will require an awareness of the entire health system’s ability to respond - “it’s not just the feds, it’s not just hospitals - It Is all of us”! </li></ul>
  9. 9. Overcoming Challenges and Meeting Our Goal <ul><li>What do planners need to know to develop plans for effective response </li></ul><ul><li>What key principles will guide our decisions </li></ul><ul><li>What important issues must be addressed </li></ul><ul><li>What information, tools and models are available as resources </li></ul>
  10. 10. For Our Health “ system” <ul><li>Develop event specific and general guidance for allocating medical resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop communication to address the non medical issues including malpractice and finance. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a risk communication plan for the public. </li></ul>
  11. 11. And <ul><li>Evaluate local, state, and federal laws. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop practical tools for verifying credentials. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop and use disaster management software and communication tools (AIMS)(HAN)(web). </li></ul><ul><li>Create strategies to gain buy-in with health and medical leadership. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Finally Get everyone to the table including during exercises and disaster response.
  13. 14. Surge Capacity: Domains <ul><li>Pre-Hospital </li></ul><ul><li>CHCs and physician offices </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare Facility </li></ul><ul><li>Public Health </li></ul><ul><li>Mental Health </li></ul><ul><li>Mass Fatality/Mortuary </li></ul>
  14. 15. Alternate Facilities <ul><li>On Hospital Campus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Office Buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parking decks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Off Hospital Campus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>HMOs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Office Buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adult Detention Facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Colleges and Schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abandoned Hospitals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Urgent Care Facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community Health Centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Transportable Facilities </li></ul>
  15. 16. Volunteer Health Care Providers <ul><li>Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) </li></ul><ul><li>Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT)/NDMS </li></ul><ul><li>Faith Based and EMAC based response </li></ul><ul><li>ESR-VHP through Public Health </li></ul>
  16. 17. Community Surge Checklists <ul><li>Identify alternate care sites and care partners. </li></ul><ul><li>MOUs for use of sites. </li></ul><ul><li>Medical supplies, equipment and pharmaceuticals. </li></ul><ul><li>Integration of information and data management. </li></ul><ul><li>Staffing with shared staff and credentialing process. </li></ul><ul><li>Patient transport. </li></ul><ul><li>Patient care protocols. </li></ul><ul><li>NIMS Checklists. </li></ul>
  17. 18. Sample NIMS Resources Management Checklist: <ul><li>Does your jurisdiction have: </li></ul><ul><li>A developed method of identifying, acquiring, allocating and tracking resources; </li></ul><ul><li>Developed mutual aid compacts to support event management; </li></ul><ul><li>All response personnel appropriately trained; </li></ul><ul><li>A list of included resources from private sector and NGOs; </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-planning before an event to manage and employ resources; </li></ul><ul><li>Developed standard processes to identify, order, mobilize, dispatch and track resources; </li></ul><ul><li>A method to categorize all event resources. </li></ul>
  18. 19. <ul><li>Compacts - not Contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Offers of Assistance for: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>staff, </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>supplies, </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>equipment </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>personnel </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Mutual Aid Compacts
  19. 20. <ul><li>Should be regional and beyond your back door - (find someone not in the same boat); </li></ul><ul><li>Include how to ask, how to receive, and how to communicate; </li></ul><ul><li>Resolve the details of how to operationalize the assistance - but realize some things will be left to good faith, good planning and good people. </li></ul>Mutual Aid Compacts
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